Model T Kiddie Car

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Model T Kiddie Car
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Perkins on Saturday, April 23, 2016 - 05:31 pm:

Looking for a kit or plans to build a model T kiddie car. Any year would be fine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, April 23, 2016 - 06:19 pm:

I wonder whether it's possible to find any retired amusement park "antique cars" and restore/rebuild them. _When I was a kid, such kiddie-cars were usually a very generic compilation of recognizable features from the Brass-Era, so they had spoked wheels, gas-headlamps, cowl-lamps, flat radiators and, for easy ingress and egress, doorless tourabout bodies. _And that was good enough.





But over the years, consumers have become maybe a bit more sophisticated and the "antique car" rides have now come a long way. _In the above photos, you can see that these cars are actually recognizable as to brand and the Cadillacs even have semi-eliptical springs and a dropped, I-beam front axle! Pretty darned good, huh?

From what I've seen, they all operate on the same principle. _The cars run on little gasoline engines that make a surprising volume of noise. _Step on the single pedal and it acts like a throttle. _Take your foot off the single pedal and the engine idles as the brakes apply and bring the car to a gentle stop. _The cars have some serious bumpers because they rear-end each other often. _Top speed is governed at something like 3 mph. _The steering wheel does control the car, but the center rail embedded in the pavement will engage a hanging "finger" on each end of the steering mechanism such that the cars can neither pass each other, nor be steered off the road (They'd steer normally if not for the center rail). _These cars are made to be driven by kids of just about any age, though the smallest shavers do need to be accompanied by an adult. _The first one I drove was at "Freedomland," in the Bronx, New York, when I was about eight years old.

Here's a nice video of some little kids driving the amusement park antique cars.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xh3xOKDvifY

Today, the Gould Manufacturing company of Canada makes a version of the antique car ride (Arrow Dynamics used to make a much nice looking version, but they went out of business). _See link:

http://www.gouldmanufacturing.com/antiqueautoride.html

Gould Manufacturing also makes a "Parade Car" version with separate accelerator and brake pedals and reverse. _It's also available in a silent, electric version. _The cars cost as much as $14,500 each, so they're not exactly cheap.

http://www.gouldmanufacturing.com/paradevehicles.html

Retired ride cars, if you can find 'em, might be a heck of a lot of fun to restore and drive on private roads and in gated communities (with a proper muffler installed); it'd sure beat the living daylights out of driving a golf kart!

See the videos here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vp1MuvcM5JM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wM2VwhvPdSs


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration