Grease Caps

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Grease Caps
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Calabrese on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 04:28 pm:

Hi all, still learning everyday about this T. Have a few questions if you all can help. The grease caps...I filled the large one on top of the ball cap but I don't see grease oozing out anywhere?? I even removed it and forced in a fair amount of grease so much so that it must be entering the gear box?? Could it just be that dry? Also, Is see two more on the rear axle near the wheels, where would you see the grease come out on those? Did I miss any? I saw the one on the steering column as well.
Thank you, Dave
Ball CapBall Cap


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 04:43 pm:

Dave, if it were my car I would remove the big grease cup and install a zerk fitting then pump in grease until it is full and slightly leaks out. Then re-install your grease cup. If you have a lot of play in the ball joint a shim will help a lot to prevent grease leaks. The grease cups for the rear axle roller bearings should be filled 2 or 3 times and screwed back on unless the bearings are dry then they need to be removed and packed. There is a felt seal inside the brake drums for the rear roller bearings. Be careful not to overfill the grease cups or the grease may leak out and get all over your brake shoes. Also, there is a small grease cup on the drive shaft right behind the large grease cup. This needs to be filled often as well. Make sure that your front hubs, bearings, and hubcaps are packed with grease. If your fan still has the stock bushings the fan hub should be filled with a heavy oil so that it's about 1/3 full. If the fan has a zerk fitting give the fan about a pump of grease every few hundred miles. The two bolts on the bottom of the torque tube that screw into the crankcase should also be wired together.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve in Tennessee on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 04:55 pm:

you can also install the zerk inside the grease cup itself. When you put the cap on you never see it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 04:56 pm:

The large one at the U-joint is large for a reason - it takes a lot of grease to fill that cavity :-)
If totally empty, 'd say it takes a whole grease tube to fill it - and that takes a lot of cups. I filled five cups there today and it still wouldn't ooze out, usually it does when you start driving, though.

The risk for grease to enter the transmission is very slim, it has to enter in the play between the transmission shaft and the bushing in the clutch plate.
The reason I knew it was time to fill today was that I saw a couple of oil drops on the garage floor under the u-joint. When it leaks oil, it's a sign it haven't got enough grease - and it hasn't been driven all that many miles since I put some in there last time.
Some guys makes a change by putting a grease zerk inside the cup, and it might be tempting :-)

The cups by the outer bearings in the rear axle doesn't need much grease, though a little every 200 miles according to the lubrication chart.
If it's a new car to you with unknown whereabouts, it may likely need a rear axle overhaul and a checkup if it has bronze thrust washers instead of the crack prone babbitt originals. At that overhaul it's advisable to put neoprene seals on the inside of the outer bearings to reduce the risk for leaking of oil mixed grease onto the emergency brake shoes..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 05:02 pm:

Dave, If my copy and paste worked this chart should help....
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/227018.html?1312566955


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 05:34 pm:

Correction of my above post - should be "it has to enter in the play between the transmission output shaft and the fourth main"

When looking at the second picture again, it looks like somebody has installed an extra unnecessary gasket between the fourth main and the u-joint ball cap. This extra gasket causes extra play for the u-joint ball and thus more grease leaks. It should be easy to loosen the four screws and remove the gasket.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Calabrese on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 05:55 pm:

Great info here, thank you...To be clear, should I see grease ooze out from the Ball Cap area?
Stephen, Can you be more specific about oiling the fan hub? I do believe mine is original and the motor always sounds a bit rattley up front. Thanks again, Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 06:07 pm:

You should see grease ooze out there after a drive when it's filled up. It's hard to fill it so full that it oozes out already when the grease is cold and nothing moves, but might be possible?

Check if you actually have an extra gasket where it shouldn't be any - that'll cause a loose ball and more grease leaks than necessary.

Different years had different lubrication methods for the fan. Early T's had a grease cup and later T's had a system where you unscrew a screw and fill with thick oil into the fan hub. Check the roots of the fan blades carefully for cracks - they do tend to crack at times. And usually they cover the inside of the hood with oil and grease. I avoid parades and drive happily without any fan :-)

(Message edited by Roger K on April 24, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Calabrese on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 06:12 pm:

Roger,
You see an extra gasket? Did someone double it up? Sounds like I should remove one


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 06:17 pm:

There should only be one gasket between the fourth main and the pan/hogshead. Nothing between the fouth main and the ball cap.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 06:17 pm:

Here is a picture with an arrow pointing to the gasket you should remove. :-)

pic


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 06:21 pm:

And the two lower screws are the wrong type - they should have drilled holes for safety wire and be wired together. The two top screws should also be secured, with cotter pins.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Calabrese on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 06:48 pm:

Okay, out it goes...will that leave me with metal to metal? Sorry to sound ignorant here, just trying to make sure I understand. Also, do those bolts have a tendency to loosen and hence the need for the wire? Thanks again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 06:56 pm:

Yes, it should be metal to metal there. All bolts on a model t has a tendency to loosen - the engine isn't balanced as good as more modern cars and it vibrates considerably. It's a good plan to check all bolts without safety wire with a wrench from time to time.

The knowledge that lock washers sometimes is enough was learned during the production time, so late T's doesn't have cotter pins in the oil pan bolts.

Another important safety issue is the studs that holds the front wishbone cap - they should also be wired together.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 06:58 pm:

Yes, metal to metal with lots of grease in between. Removing the gasket will close up the excess clearance you currently have between the ball cap and the rear axle ball.

Here is an older thread talking about the safety wire:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/425871.html?1393081993

:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Frost on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 07:13 pm:

New guy dumb question. What type of grease do you use on a T for general use in the cups, lithium, wheel bearing, newer red, or something else? Thanks, Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Calabrese on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 07:19 pm:

Great advice, thank you. I'll try and find the correct bolts on Langs. I did check most of the nuts and bolts and I was surprised at how many were loose...The six bolts that attach the driveshaft to the rear end were the worse.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Sunday, April 24, 2016 - 09:47 pm:

The rear radius rod nuts should have lock washers. They have a tendency to loosen up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, April 25, 2016 - 09:53 am:

Dave Frost, any wheel bearing grease will probably work just fine for all the grease cups on the car. If it's a mainly unrestored car you may want to clean out, inspect and repack the front wheel bearings - the grease used in the old days tends to harden with age.

(Message edited by Roger K on April 25, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Monday, April 25, 2016 - 12:15 pm:

I'm not sure about the large one but the smaller cups can easily be converted to zerk fittings by running a 1/8 NPT tap down it, (no drilling required), and screwing in a short 1/8" zerk. The cover goes back on perfectly so it's a no-show.


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