1926 TT

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: 1926 TT
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David White on Sunday, May 01, 2016 - 05:14 pm:

Although I was weaned on Model Ts at age 14, this is my first TT. I am starting to restore a 1926 with a very rough wood cab in pieces though I can use the parts and hardware as patterns. My first question is what are the correct front fenders. Online all photos I have seen show that they are clearly not the traditional 26 passenger car front fenders. I am sure that I will have more questions, but if anyone can help me with what I should be looking for that is NOT the traditional 26 passenger cars details, I would greatly appreciate it. Thank you in advance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Sunday, May 01, 2016 - 06:17 pm:

Your '26 TT should use the 1925 style front fenders. For whatever reason TT's never made the transition to the 1926-27 improved car style front fenders.

There is also, as a part of this discussion, the question of a TT using passenger car style fenders (with the splash apron bead) or commercial style fenders (no splash apron bead). I've seen them both ways, so I'll leave it to others to weigh in on this aspect of it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, May 01, 2016 - 08:42 pm:

TT design stopped with the 25, as it was all decline from there and the heavy trucks were "above that". :-)

It seems unusual that you'd have a wood cab so late.

Got pix of this beast ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David White on Monday, May 02, 2016 - 07:23 am:

Frankly, from the information you guys have provided, and although I was told it was a 26' I am now wondering if that is true. How can I determine the likely year?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David White on Monday, May 02, 2016 - 07:33 am:

If ford produced the TT with the Ford steel body only in 26-27 (beginning perhaps at the end or 25), did he still sell just running gears?
This photo is of the the frame when I bought it, but the wood body is in pieces now strewn across the shop floor for patterns. I will attempt to post reasonable photos of it. Thanks again


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David White on Monday, May 02, 2016 - 07:35 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David White on Monday, May 02, 2016 - 07:36 am:

Oops! downsizing is an art


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, May 02, 2016 - 08:00 am:

After some 600,000 1926 model year Fords (both truck and passenger) were built, Ford started to stamp the engine # on the top of the frame in about the hand brake cross shaft position. If yours is a '26 made during the spring - summer of '26, it should have a # somewhere there, most likely on the RH frame member. But it may just as well be a '26 made during the autumn/winter of '25 without any # :-)

From this page in the online encyclopedia you can see that Ford made more TT chassis than bodies during '26 model year, so many were still sold without bodies for the buyer to choose a body maker or build something by himself: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/1926.htm

Only one rivet in each end of the hand brake quadrant points to a 1925 or later date on your chassis. Nice project :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, May 02, 2016 - 12:54 pm:

Methinks you have a Bitsa TT ... I see a wood fellow wheel (early) and a 26-27 "boot cleaner" running
board.

This brings me to my perpetual argument that these were industrial machines, like locomotives, and
that getting the steel delivered or the potatoes in from the field was far more of a concern for their operators
than keeping the vehicle "original". They just didn't care. That's a nuevo-concept, dreamed up LONG
after the original operators were dead and gone by collectors and restorers.

While it's good to know the general period of production of your parts, to understand the many running
changes that were made and how they do/do not apply to YOUR rig, also understand that they were little-
loved workhorses and patched together with everything but the kitchen sink just to keep them working, so
as part of the period character of those times, one of those character bits is, in itself, the patched-together
nature of the vehicles, ESPECIALLY the trucks !

If your original engine is still with the truck, it would pinpoint production pretty tightly. What does the
ignition switch surround look like ? That is telling. Either way, you have a pretty rough starting point and
you won't be destroying anything to build it any way you please.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, May 02, 2016 - 01:04 pm:

What Burger said is so true. I'll carry his theme to its next level.

Once you decide what engine you're going to use, look up the year model of that engine then as far as the world is concerned that's what year the truck is. Period. You do not want to play a game of "What year is it really?" with the DMV later.

The above assumes there's no title, which looks pretty unlikely. If you do have title for it, then stick to whatever it says.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Monday, May 02, 2016 - 01:12 pm:

Interestingly I have a chassis just like that...in fact two. The one shown is the latest version frame given the body mounts...it even looks like it may have had a vaporizer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Monday, May 02, 2016 - 01:15 pm:

Hi David,

Your large picture allows for close inspection.

I see '26-7 front motor mount, the "boot scraper" running boards used in '26-7 as Burger stated, the frame to body brackets (between the firewall and running board strap) are the '26-7 style and the handbrake quadrant is riveted to the frame with only two rivets and that started in 1925, before then they used four rivets.

I'd call it a 1926 until there is over powering evidence to the contrary. It may have been purchased as a bare chassis and the cab and body provided by an aftermarket firm or, perhaps, the buyer built it.

Good luck with your project. Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Palmisano on Monday, May 02, 2016 - 02:13 pm:

Here is an example of a 1926 with a wood body made by The Mifflinburg Body Co.

Mifflinburg

David, is there a engine number stamped on the top of the passenger side frame rail?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, May 02, 2016 - 02:27 pm:

I loved pre-1930 cars since I was a really little kid in the 60's. Not sure why. I liked anything old like
that, old buildings, old fences, old barns, piles of rusty things ... it was all cool.

Never acted on the T thing until I spent 3 years in AFG and had an epiphany about how many years
I has left and what I did and did not want spend those years on. So I bought a couple TT's and the
"adventure" was on.

Now, I see all this through an atypical prism .... I have spent decades restoring 50's cars, and as a
comparable, T's are ultra cheap, super easy to find parts and knowledgeable resources for, and to my
weird perspective, should reflect a much less refined, or "organic" period of automotive and cultural
development than what cars were by the 50's. Further on this, I am really turned off by current-day
asshats who see old cars only through a prism of car shows, over-restoration, and competitive trophy
chasing. Rather, I like to see old cars going about their business as if there is nothing out of the ordinary
going on, ... in the case of my TT, it's just another day on the farm and we have another load of wood
to bring in. Any "car show" is what people get when they see a neat old truck still out doing what old
trucks were meant to do. No posing around on the green or a sweltering parking lot with a bunch of
other old fat guys and their over-polished bling machines.

As a result of this, I love the TT. It hauls just about anything you can fit on it. When it gets bent or
scratched, that's OK. A hammer and some rattle can black paint and we're good to go. "Farmer
Brown perfect" !

This makes things really super easy and low stress. No $10,000 paint jobs, no $15,000 chrome
bills. You just bang it together with a bunch of advice from those who know how they went together,
and you just enjoy driving it and putting smiles on everyones' faces that see it going down the road.

It is hard to beat a vehicle like this for maximum fun and smiles for the money you will put into it.
That is, IF you have the right attitude. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Perry Goble on Monday, May 02, 2016 - 03:41 pm:

It looks like you have 20" rear wheels , that is correct for 26/27 . The early ones had 23"wheels . Your rear pumpkin is the later one,correct for 26/27 . The early one had a ring were the axle housing meets the pumpkin .


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Perry Goble on Monday, May 02, 2016 - 04:17 pm:

If your steering column housing were it bolts up to the firewall is square . That would be 26/27 only.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David White on Tuesday, May 03, 2016 - 03:29 am:

Thank you guys for your help. I found the stamped number on the frame rail. It appears to read 14,672,559 which makes it feb 1927 the best I can determine. This is a project to attempt to replicate a TT that was owned by our local city mission that has been so dynamic to our community. Volunteers are waiting to help. Although I do not have the original engine, and I can build the wood body with no problem, with your help I clearly can get the Ford running gear correct. I will followup with more photos as we progress. I am sure I will have more questions for you all.


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