Tire Tube Patch - How to patch a tire tube?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Tire Tube Patch - How to patch a tire tube?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Daniel M. Chapasko on Saturday, May 07, 2016 - 10:07 am:

Why can't I find a tire tube patch that will hold. How do you patch a tube today? Where do you find bonding glue that works. Have you had trouble finding a patch and glue that works? I used to patch my own tubes years ago and could rely on the patch to hold. What works best to repair a tube?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, May 07, 2016 - 10:19 am:

Hot Camel patches are best.










Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Saturday, May 07, 2016 - 11:08 am:

You can still find cans of Camel patches like that on ebay. I have several unopened NOS cans for display. Have never patched a tire with them but I'm sure they work. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Saturday, May 07, 2016 - 11:33 am:

The new tire patches you get from a good bike shop are very good. You can fix a tube on the side of the road in a few seconds and be on your way. I have used the Camel ones with good and bad luck. I think you have to make sure you get a good burn and the clamp is on tight. Of course both patch type like nice clean scuffed rubber.

Try the bike ones you'll like them


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Saylor, Citrus Heights, Ca on Saturday, May 07, 2016 - 12:12 pm:

I have heard that the newer tubes are made with a silicone rubber which will not accept the hot vulcanizing Patch. Has anyone tried it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, May 07, 2016 - 09:06 pm:

John it is true. The hot Camel patches do not stick to silicone rubber.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Saturday, May 07, 2016 - 09:23 pm:

Silicone rubber is expensive. I doubt that tubes are made with it. Tubes these days seem to have a mold release or finish that makes it difficult to patch. It could be a silicone spray is used for a mold release and that could explain the difficulty.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Sunday, May 08, 2016 - 02:42 pm:

Back in the balloon-tire Schwinn days of my youth, my friends and I rode our bikes hard and abused the living daylights out of 'em. _And we'd get flats and go through sets of tires with surprising frequency.

At times, we'd blow out a tire far from home and there just wasn't much choice about having to fix the stupid thing right then and there. _After having done it so many darned time, we learned that the task of patching an inner-tube was best performed under controlled conditions at home, where we could use things like a table-vise and a bucket of water to check for air bubbles.

Therefore, when it became necessary to deal with a flat on the road, rather than attempt to mend a punctured inner-tube, it was easier to yank it out of the tire entirely and stuff in a good spare tube. _If a gas station was in sightógreatówe'd pump it up there; if not, we'd work up a good summer sweat on the skinny, portable air-pump we carried. _Once home, we'd tackle the job of fixing the puncture at our leisure. _I don't suppose it'd be much different with a Flivver Clincher.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, May 09, 2016 - 02:13 am:

Bob's posting reminded me of my High School Days, before license & before I got my Model A running. I would ride my bicycle to Mount Shasta City, only 8 miles but 1,000 feet higher in elevation. I had to take back roads, as there was no real frontage road and I-5 was a bit hairy to bicycle ride along (although for one mile, it was the only option); so I took many back roads--dirt & gravel. I carried Camel Patches, the clamp and matches--and a pump. Out in the "middle of nowhere" you had to be prepared!


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