Transmission shop-Non-Ford-Photo

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Transmission shop-Non-Ford-Photo
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Monday, May 09, 2016 - 11:15 pm:

Any ideas as to what these are for?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Monday, May 09, 2016 - 11:24 pm:

Herb,
Many early cars (through 1909) had sliding gear transmissions with a differential to chain system. This is an example of a Thomas a Flyer transmission (courtesy "The Old Motor"):


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 09:38 am:

Each one of the gear cases has a card on the bench that probably has some type of information about what they are. Just a guess of course. If the calendar was a little clearer on the upper right of the picture it probably has a date that would at least narrow down when the pic was taken.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 10:26 am:

It may be a dealership shop. All of the units in the photo look similar enough to me to be the same make, just different models or different production years. Pure guess, obviously.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 12:26 pm:

It's a great photo. Those are incredible units. I have enjoyed finding books with pictures at swap meets. Here are 2 similar ones.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Owens on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 01:17 pm:

Looks like Tractors to me, Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 01:56 pm:

Judging by the one guy without an apron and smoking a pipe he might be the instructor and the others are students :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 02:02 pm:

Wow, I sure wish I had the car that uses those! I think that's probably a factory photo from whatever car manufacturer that was.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 02:48 pm:

Find an old Pontiac Tempest. They had a transaxle in the rear. I think it was in the early to mid 60s. I remember helping my dad replace the brakes on one. I also remember that car having nothing but trouble with one thing or another.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 08:57 am:

The EMF and Flanders cars of the early teens had transaxles, though I'm not sure if they looked anything like that?

Floyd Clymer tried to make a publicity run from Denver to Spokane with a new 1910 Flanders "20" as a 14 year old together with his 9 year old brother, but the transmission with only two speeds kept on breaking down until they had to quit the run. This turned out to be a general problem with the Flanders cars - soon they were redesigned to three gears.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 09:53 am:

OT, but some of those old Pontiac Tempests also had a 4 cylinder engine that was half of a V8 with one side chopped off. Looked like a V8 from one side, but when you went to the other side, where did the rest of the engine go? :-)

https://stevemckelvie.wordpress.com/2012/07/20/the-1962-pontiac-tempest-a-car-wi th-half-of-an-engine/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 10:16 am:

Maybe the photo above (if it is a repair shop) helps explain Henry Ford's opinion of the sliding gear transmission as a "mechanical crime" in 1906:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 12:30 am:

In the last few years some guy has been trying to sell a newly manufactured transmission and chain drive diffy, as in these photos. Beautiful work and very nice. He has has it for sale at Chickasha, and Bakersfield. Think it was in the $2500 range.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 07:27 am:

The parts on the floor look like the top cover to the mechanisms on the benches.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nicholas Lingg - Tarboro, NC on Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 07:46 am:

Probably a picture from the Sweeney School
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweeney_School


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Saturday, May 14, 2016 - 01:38 am:

Nobody guessed (possibly) Overland yet?
Wait. They looked not like that, right? I dunno myself. Can't remember the buddies back yard right now. Smaller.
Jerry Van nails it for me. Factory pic. :-) ???

Sliding gear transmissions: In 1914 (IF I have my head on square) a priest/owner commented that shifting his '0something Panhard/Levassor was "Brutal".... Butterworth said.
I've too many questions for this world. :-)
Wait. Rob, How similar are the drive-trains between the B and the K? Ie, the trans and rear axle....
You commented about wishing for a B to tour with (on another thread)... I went back to study my old resources (1905 Ford catalog).
Foolishness stopped.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, May 15, 2016 - 01:15 am:

Sorry, those ain't no Overland's. 1st Overland had no inspection cover that size. The Overland transmission had a removable cover nearly square and it covered the entire top of the transmission. The transmission shown had what appears to be equally split cases . Overland transmission were cast in steel, and not split cases.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Sunday, May 15, 2016 - 11:18 pm:

overland had maney transmissions from 1903 to 20 but not those. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Beaumont on Monday, May 16, 2016 - 12:25 am:

Looks like it could be Simplex to me, the lightweight axle tubes designate a double chain drive rather than a trans-axle carrying the entire weight of the car. Best, Jeff


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Monday, May 16, 2016 - 11:41 am:

Jeff, Simplex is a good possibility. It brought to mind the 1/6th scale models Edgar Roy built in the 1970's. Here is a photo from a 1974 Bulb Horn article.



Also a discussion of the project from the AACA forum:
http://forums.aaca.org/topic/161797-1911-simplex-in-miniature/

It was a truly remarkable project. Engines ran and tires were inflatable.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dylan Thomas Wills on Monday, May 16, 2016 - 11:54 am:

What did the Studebaker transaxles look like? Any similarity to those?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Monday, May 16, 2016 - 01:25 pm:

not Studebaker or e.m.f. !! the new trans was built by Geo gagle from Joplin, mo i think it is still for sale. charley


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration