Model t coils

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Model t coils
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rfbuff on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 08:12 pm:

Help. Have 1914 touring car, runs good on mag for about 10 miles. After that it starts to miss fire like a coil isn't working. Can a coil get hot and brake down? Thinking about going with distriboutor, can I still run off of mag? Thanks for the help.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 08:21 pm:

You may have a bad capacitor in one coil. Have they been checked and or professionally rebuilt?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steven Thum on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 08:22 pm:

Yes a coil that is not set correctly can get hot and stop working. A set of rebuilt coils can cost less than a distributor. You can not run off your mag with a distributor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 08:27 pm:

A failing and/or incorrect value capacitor can very much do that. The best available and proper value capacitors MUST be used here. Cut NO corners. Besides. The best available are so cheap that even I can afford them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Spainhower - Portland, Oregon on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 08:52 pm:

Clean the timer. There are a lot of links in the ignition chain. This one seems to be a temperature issue (10 minutes to warm up). Under normal operation, a coil doesn't get hot (not counting '26-'27 coils under the hood). A timer does, though. Ditto the other low-voltage connections under the hood. Make sure all the connections are clean and tight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 - 08:56 pm:

You can run a distributor with a T coil and magneto. Murray F. book "The MOdel T Ford Owner" page 288 tell how using and Atwater-Kent and Pg 293 for the Bosch 600.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David L Corman on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 06:58 am:

Royce is correct, get your set of coils checked. I would suggest new points and capacitors for all of them. The last set I had done was with an EECT which turned out great. If that is not available, use a HCTT. When done right, they will last for years. Also check condition of timer and you will be good to go.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 07:16 am:

Wait....Yes, the image is getting clearer.....Yes, Yes......I see it now.......There is an info-mercial in our future.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 08:42 am:

Buff
Your problem could very well be a coil, but it could also be caused by another problem.
As Bruce pointed out the Model T ignition system is comprised of sub-systems and each must be working correctly for the system to function as intended.
The sub-systems are magneto, coilbox, switch, coils, wiring and timer.
Because the coils are easily removed that is a logical place to start. In fact, you usually get more bang for your repair buck when working on a poor running Model T by getting the coils in top condition.
Coils do sometimes get hot and fail and the main culprits are incorrect capacitor type having been installed in the coils or frayed timer wiring with shorts to ground causing the coil to exceed its intended duty cycle. There is a simple test for this problem, if you give me a call I will walk you through the procedure.
The best trouble shooting technique is to step by step get each subsystem in good working order and go on to the next.
Ron Patterson
859-881-1677


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Kossor - Kenilworth, NJ on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 09:55 am:

Wow Hal, your post seems to have caused the ubiquitous moniker to be dropped.

What's next, discouraging the sharing of all positive experiences with goods and services that could be construed as endorsements?

(Message edited by mkossor on May 11, 2016)

(Message edited by mkossor on May 11, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David L Corman on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 07:54 pm:

Buff, Next time you are out in your car have the coil box lid off. Drive till it begins to misfire, then lightly put your index finger on each set of points one at a time, which will open the circuit. If no change in engine power, that is the coil that is laying down. Most of us carry a spare coil along. I have done 12 Florida Winter Tours, a Savannah GA.tour, and Natchez Trace tour and I never had them out of the coil box all that time. They were set up by Ron Patterson on a HCCT as used in the Ford garages back in the day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David L Corman on Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 07:07 am:

After the Winter tour this year, I took the coils to a Tin Lizzie club member who refreshed them with new points and capacitors using an ECCT. Either type of tester will make a huge difference in how your car starts and runs. It is all in how the points are set, how cushion spring is adjusted, and having a correct capacitor. I feel that it is money well spent.


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