Spindle shims

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Spindle shims
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 06:30 pm:

Does anyone know if there are shims available to take up the space between the axle and the spindle bushing. My axle is worn on the top, I installed the new bushings, filed the ridge off the axle but there is .030 clearance now. I have an array of 1/2" washers but their all too thick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stephen D Heatherly on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 08:15 pm:

I had this problem once. I made a shim and installed it between the lower spindle bushing and the spindle then faced off the thrust surfaces until it fit in the axle.

Stephen


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 08:18 pm:

Check your local hardware store, many carry thin washers called bushings or spacers.

Worked for this repair.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 09:04 pm:

yea thanks didn't get to the stores yet, I thought maybe some company manufactured them


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting, Clare, Iowa on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 09:28 pm:

We sometimes take the top bushing and run Babbitt around under the top flange, and then lathe it to the size, or thickness you need before you press it in.

It will look like factory, and not a washer under a flange.

Some times we also take a thrust bearing and fit it between the flange and the axle, so it never wears again.

Herm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 09:43 pm:

The shim washers are called "machinery bushings" here.
I have to ask though, why are you worrying about it? I know I wouldn't


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 - 11:37 pm:

One thing you do need to be careful about. IF (that big "IF" again) the wear is such that the spindle (pin itself) is loose in the top hole of the axle? It can lead to a potentially disastrous breaking of the king-pin. It all depends on what wore and how badly. If the king-pin seized into the spindle, and steering the car wore the top hole more than the bottom (where the pin threads into) is a BAD combination. The big problem being that the top hole wears off to the inside (due to the weight distribution) and becomes difficult to properly repair without the proper repair tools. I have read about both Stevens (?) (Stevenson?) and K R Wilson (?I think?) axle repair tools. Someone (I hate to say I am not sure who) has remade some of the tooling for these. Hopefully, one of several people much more familiar with this job will chime in with worthwhile information.
A very good close friend of mine many years ago broke a king-pin on his Rajo racing car at about 90 mph and had an exciting time pulling the car onto the shoulder of the freeway before getting a ride for his truck and trailer.
It was later determined the king-pin broke because the axle was loose in the top, and tight in the threads (just how it had managed to wear) and the stress on the new king-ping caused it to break at the top of the threads on the bottom end. It twisted the axle, and laid the wheel back somewhat causing it to steer very badly. If the king-pin had gone ahead and broken also at the top (instead of twisting the axle) the wheel probably would have dropped out and he likely would have been killed at that speed.
I often say a prayer of thanks that he was not hurt that time (or a few others), as he is one of the best friends I have ever had.
Do drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Keppler, Fredon NJ on Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 04:06 am:

Les I constantly here about the model T shimmy problem so I'm trying to get the front end as tight as possible. .030 is substantial, why not put a shim in???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 04:18 am:

Sure, I also got a 0.030 play between the axle and the spindle when I built the front axle on my primitive pickup. Fortunately I found a couple of fitting aluminum washers in my stash and put them on the underside where the axial forces aren't as high. Tightened the spindle bolts until there was just a little drag when turning the spindles.
When I first backed up with the pickup I thought it was much steadier than other T's, but now after some 1400 miles it has loosened up some and the steering is as squirrely in reverse as any T, though no shimmy when going forward, and that's most important ;)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 08:54 am:

I think Jack Putnam has some of those tools.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:27 am:

Doug,

It's not important to remove that clearance. It'll never be a problem. Especially only .030".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, May 12, 2016 - 10:35 am:

Doug,

I see your additional post above. Clamping down on the axle yokes to make drag on the spindle is a poor way to eliminate shimmy. Especially since any gap there is not the cause of shimmy in the first place. It's a band-aide fix. After just a little bit of wear, the drag will go away and your shimmy will return. The main cause of shimmy is play, or lost motion, in one or more of the components of your steering linkage.


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