How correct is this WW1 T scale model ? No seat or backrest at all ?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: How correct is this WW1 T scale model ? No seat or backrest at all ?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Friday, May 13, 2016 - 08:07 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, May 13, 2016 - 08:21 am:

Might be their isn't a correct pattern for many of the T's used in WW1. All were chassis shipped over at first, then later ambulance bodies were built to a rather standard pattern.

Cars for field work would have varied, and cars for carrying goods or personnel were sometimes just std. runabouts and touring cars.





From FordOwner, May, 1917 article.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, May 13, 2016 - 08:36 am:

And this earlier post has some rather nice photos too. Machine gun runabout, one later with black radiator, and one replica with brass radiator.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/89588.html?1240661219


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Friday, May 13, 2016 - 09:28 am:

What little research i have done so far, I am in the process of restocreating a WWI Light Patrol Vehicle, is that their are very few alike.
Henry Ford was an isolationist who did not want to sell Model T's to be used for the war effort. He did sell about 2500 after the US entered the war under the provision that they be used for ambulances only.
Several Commonwealth nations already had Model T's or conscripted them for military use. Some were used as machine gun carriers, known as the Vickers Carrier such as your model, and some were stripped down to the bare body necessary and used as long range desert patrol vehicles.
If you Google WWI Model T, you will see various era photos and some modern reproductions, but IMO, the modern vehicles are representative of the species rather than following a set of military plans that never existed.

My own project will be a 1915 chassis, hood, dash and front fenders, running boards and rar fenders. I have the plans for the open light express wooden body, but I will decide on the final design as I go along. I'm leaning towards something like this with a Browning M1917 .30 cal water cooled machine gun in the bed of the rear, rather than mounted in the passenger compartment.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Friday, May 13, 2016 - 10:33 am:

Dan, Thanks for the great pics and info.

Robert, have you considered restocreating one of these Royal Navy babies (for great info open the pdf file on this page):

http://www.royal-naval-association.co.uk/news/brave-report-issue-17/

Also see:

http://www.landships.info/landships/car_articles.html?load=car_articles/armoured_tford.html

By the way, I'm looking for a NOS set of these white wall tyres (see below) :-).




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine on Friday, May 13, 2016 - 10:38 am:

Type:...................Light Armoured Car
Place of origin:........United Kingdom

Service history
In service:.............Car chassis, armoured bodywork, open superstructure, 11 built (1916)

Production history
Designer:..............Petty Officer L. Gutteridge
Designed:..............1916
Manufacturer:.........W. G. Allen & Sons

Specifications
Weight:................1.1 metric tons
Length:.................3.4 m
Width:..................?m
Height:.................?m
Crew:...................3 (commander/mg gunner, mg loader, driver)
Armour:................5 mm (9mm gun shield)
1st armament:.........303 Vickers machine gun
2nd armament:.......None
Engine:................Ford 2.9L liquid cooled petrol I4, 20 hp
Suspension:...........4x2 wheel, leaf spring
Range:.................?km
Speed:.................35 km/h,

Early in 1916 the 1 Sqn, Royal Naval Armoured Car Division, asked its base in the United Kingdom to provide a light armoured car to complement the Lanchester and Seabrook establishment. The new vehicle was based Ford Model T as it had already demonstrated its sturdy cross country abilities in other theatres of war and was, moreover, simple and robust. It could be considered to be a direct descendent of the earlier Admiralty Talbot, 6 of which had been built in 1914. As it was calculated that the conversion would double the Model Tís weight the chassis was reinforced with stronger suspension springs and tie rods on the back axle. The Model Ts quaint appearance had generated much mirth on their arrival in the Dobruja area of Russia but, as the autumn rains had set in and several of the heavier cars bogged down and were lost, they continued wallowing along through the mud without undue difficulty.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Friday, May 13, 2016 - 10:39 am:

I have an original,wood ammo box from WW1.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Friday, May 13, 2016 - 11:08 am:

Robert

You posted Henry Ford was an isolationist who did not want to sell Model T's to be used for the war effort. He did sell about 2500 after the US entered the war under the provision that they be used for ambulances only.

Perhaps more to the story, Henry was very helpful to the War effort, these contemporary articles are from the year 1917.

Henry was busy selling Model T's to the public, and worried the War Department, under the president would cut off mfg. raw mat'l supplies and restrict auto sales during the war period.

That didn't happen, but Ford did bring out the TT truck and the Fordson at that same time, that helped with the war efforts. But the War Dept. make specs for large trucks for the military, larger than the TT, so Ford didn't get in on that market. But, Henry made a lot of airplane engines, and armor for aircraft too, along with lots of tractors for helping civilians survive war torn areas.








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