Seeping freeze plug

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Seeping freeze plug
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Christopher McCulley on Monday, May 16, 2016 - 10:06 pm:

Here lately, I've noticed a slight coolant leak. And I've also noticed after driving the T for awhile, the leak stops. Today I noticed the leak was seeping from a freeze plug and suspect that as the engine warms and the block thermally expands, the plug seals. I discovered the plug wasn't seated uniformly. At the 3 o'clock position it was protruded.

My question is; what is the best fix? I used a 3/8" extension and a 3 lb. hammer and gently reseated it to where it is uniformly seated. As of this writing, I don't know if the leak is fixed or not. It got late and tomorrow is another day.

Thanks in advance....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Boe on Monday, May 16, 2016 - 10:27 pm:

Christopher,

I have never had one leak. The old timers use Permatex as a precautionary thing when installing them. You could remove the plug and install a new one or just clean well and smear some sealer all around the current plug. If you want to remove it, I have always found that a flat blade screwdriver driven into the center of the plug gives you great leverage to wiggle it out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell, Huntsville, AL on Monday, May 16, 2016 - 10:34 pm:

A person that rebuild my engine uses sealant on the plug. It helped it to fall out while going down the road. Just get a new plug, drill a hole in the center of the leaking one to aid removal, clean the area where it needs to seat and install the new one correctly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, May 16, 2016 - 10:44 pm:

Have smeared a thin coat of J-B Weld over weeping frost plug. Still going strong now for 5 years, no seeps :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 01:49 am:

If it's brass just try setting it better with a punch at the leak. If it's fairly new and steel don't think just putting a screwdriver through it will work real well.

John;
Sounds like they didn't seat them and just glued them in. Hope you checked the rest of them. Putting a smear of something like Permatex will not help them fall out unless not seated correctly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell, Huntsville, AL on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 08:29 am:

Mark, Replaced all of them. No sealant applied, and no leaking.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Strickling on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 08:46 am:

I was told by a rebuilder to use some 2 part epoxy around the edge of the plug.

Be sure to clean the seat area very good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Syverson on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 09:02 am:

I would think that there might be a lot of rusty crud laying in the block behind the plugs. If there was , this would be the time to clean it out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 11:02 am:

I agree


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 12:16 pm:

The hole in the block must be clean (no rust) and dry. Plugs installed with JB Weld never leak.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Castelldefels (Spain) on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 12:34 pm:

Is JB Weld enough to hold the plug or does it also need to be concave as well?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 02:03 pm:

You need to make it concave before installation if you are using a nickel. Then you hit the center of the concave part to tighten it into the hole.

Commercial plugs are concave when you buy them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ray Syverson on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 03:29 pm:

As I recall, when you buy a new freeze plug, they have a concave shape. They fit in the hole nicely, with the bulged surface on the outside. Then you hit it with a ballpeen hammer to set it, and it spreads out a little and seats itself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 03:45 pm:

U are correct.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil, Fullerton, CA, USA on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 04:48 pm:

Sometimes you do everything right and they still leak. I installed a new brass one as part of an overhaul. Everything was clean and the concave surface was tapped.

Once in a while after a long run it will seep. No amount of further tapping or covering with goop will stop the seep. Perhaps Permatex or JB weld might do it but I'd rather install a new one so I ould coat the surface with goop as its installed.

For now, the seep is too minor to cause concern. Every 6 months I might have to add a bit of coolant.

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Sole - Castelldefels (Spain) on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 06:59 pm:

OK, I'll use JB Weld and give them a little hammer whack as well. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Christopher McCulley on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 07:40 pm:

Thanks for the information. If t still leaks, I'll yank it out and replace it with a new one. Even though I'm a bit partial to using a buffalo nickel. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 - 08:49 pm:

I will never purchase a soft plug again and pay shipping for something that rusts out or thin brass. What I have done for years is use a nickel (at the coin store if you want to match the car and again less expensive and quicker). Put it on a 5/8 socket for a perfect fit or an 11/16 socket and place a pall peen hammer on the center of the coin supported on your vice or something else strong and stable. Take another hammer and give it a few whacks to dish it in. You can take a file and make a edge cut easy to help seat it and with a little sealer dive it in with your socket extension to expand it in place. The socket extension is convex on the tip and will seat it well. That job is done and unless the block rusts away it is forever.


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