Under porch archeology

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Under porch archeology
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 04:35 pm:

I did some digging under the front porch of the house my dad grew up in anyone know what the head gaskets fit?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 04:54 pm:

Cool stash :-)
The gasket to the right looks like Chevrolet up to 1928.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 05:17 pm:

The pair 2nd from the right might be Cadillac V-8. 1926-27 per Olson's web site.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Watson -Florence,Colorado on Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 05:36 pm:

Absolutely love the Roller Skates! Brings back so many memories

-Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 09:02 pm:

There is an ice saw there. Used to cut blocks of ice from lakes for the ice house to use during the summer. The blocks where put in the ice house and packed with sawdust.

Nothing good about that industry and if you don't like your job consider those guys...out in the winter cutting holes in a lake and sawing blocks of ice then prying them out to sled them to shore to the ice house and don't fall in or you will die. In the summer the ice man has to load the blocks on his truck or wagon with tongs and carry them into a house each day.

Tim Moore


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 09:21 pm:

Not so very long ago. The Union Ice truck made deliveries to our neighbors across the street, who still had an icebox. They had a bunch of kids, and kept a cow for milk.

One of the first American millionaires sold ice. It was cut from New England lakes and ponds in the winter, stored in ice houses, and shipped all over the world in insulated ships.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Christopher McCulley on Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 09:27 pm:

From the looks of it, keep digging. You might find Jimmy Hoffa under there! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andy Loso St Joseph, MN on Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 09:30 pm:

Tim,

That is a hay knife for cutting loose hay out in small chunks where it was packed into the mow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stanley L Brown Drury, MA on Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 08:24 pm:

Right call on the hay knife Andy, we had one just like it I used to use to cut the tight packed hay out of the mow. Gave it to a museum.
Stan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 09:14 pm:

Thanks for the info found more today I will take more pics I won't post pics of what the racoons left!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, May 20, 2016 - 09:48 pm:

Ice saws look much more like a logger's crosscut saw in shape, with a single handle end and
finer teeth that cut on the push stroke.

Before mechanical refrigeration, a huge ice business was run out of Platte River Canġn, SW
of Denver. Ice ponds were dug out in wide areas along the river and allowed to freeze over.
The flash freezing in that area and low amount of snow created crystal clear ice. The ice was
harvested with large conveyors and hauled into Denver on the narrow gauge Colorado & Southern's
South Park line, where it was stored in enormous ice houses with thick walls filled with sawdust
providing insulation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 05:36 am:

The real question is "Who knows what is in the 5 gal bucket?" Hint, no real model T man would be without it.:-) Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Strickling on Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 07:53 am:

5 gallons of ICE CREAM


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 10:56 am:

This thread reminds me of a time a few years ago when my son and a friend of ours stopped at a neighbor ladies house. She was digging around her front porch. She had just bought the old farm house and was trying to straighten up the front porch because it was sagging. I suggested that we dig a hole and start stacking rocks while one of us pried up the porch floor with a long board as a pry bar. Well wouldn't you know it I dug up a Model T radiator cap right in that hole. When I told everyone what it was the response was "Keep digging maybe the rest of the car is down there".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 11:01 am:

It's that Depression Era mentality. Throw NOTHING away. I saw both my Grandfathers doing exactly the same thing. It affected everyone that went through it. Guess they were right to a certain degree because some of that "junk" is definitely "treasure" now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 12:56 pm:

Dan, it wouldn't have something to do with roofing tar would it??? :-)
Heh heh heh--hey, someone had to bring it up!!
"Oh, a wise guy, eh?" <poke--poke>


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 01:16 pm:

Looking that the interior photo up top, has anyone pulled the housekeeper aside to "have a little talk" ???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 01:33 pm:

Dan the 5 gal paper pail says golelitz confectionery company west Chicago Il 30 lbs net and its stamped candy corn it looks like a picture of a rooster


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 01:51 pm:

Burger I won't show the bad stuff a lot of racoons lived and died under their! It was nailed up a long time ago. the house keeper I would like to talk to is the last tenant no rent for a year ruined the sink and tub and let the boiler freeze no money for gas cleanup under porch was easy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 02:35 pm:

I live for this stuff. Old forgotten places filled with peoples' left-behinds and "trash". My shop is filled with it.
No better time is had than going out on adventures looking for it. My T is a big part of that scene. A real icebreaker
with strangers when you want to root through their neglected spaces and haul away their junk. The people I meet
and the stories they share. It is a great connection with old days and old ways ...

... like the time we asked to poke around and try to find/dig the outhouse at a big Victorian home in a small town
south of here. We knew many had approached the owner, only to be turned away. The T was the magic key. The
owner told us a story of Grandpa dropping his false teeth down the hole. A family legend that he always wondered
if it was true. He walked us right to where he remembered the outhouse standing. We got to digging and found
enormous boulders rolled down the hole. Giant side chambers had to be dug to roll the boulders of to the side.
We kept going. We found lots of junk. Old bottles, metal objects, and sure enough, Grandpa's teeth !

The story was that Grandpa stayed back east, while the rest of the family came west, waiting for his teeth to be
finished. Once handed over, Grandpa hopped on a train and joined the family, the house was built, a barn, and in
a back corner of the barn, an outhouse.

It was a bitter cold winter night when the teeth somehow leaped from Grandpa's mouth and down the hole they
went. He told the family he wasn't about to go down that hole, let alone put those teeth back in his mouth. He
lived without teeth for the rest of his life. It was family legend. The old man didn't want Grandpa's teeth. We offered.
He just wanted to know if the story was true. Widdo Bwudder still has those teeth in one of the fruit jars we dug up
that day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 03:19 pm:

Ah! The lost treasure room of King Toot-His-Old-Toy-Horn!


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