The ultimate period-correct accessory

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: The ultimate period-correct accessory
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 09:31 am:

Does anybody know how to move it?

http://quincy.craigslist.org/for/5532747588.html

For once, price isn't the problem. It's just all the logistics of what to do with it once it's mine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 09:47 am:

Now I see...

Notice the hinges on the doors. THAT'S what makes it a Model T garage!

: ^ )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 10:45 am:

I could use some garage space. I'm tempted to go rent a big truck and bring it home in pieces, but I'll just be too busy for the next few weeks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Wetherbee - Downeast Maine on Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 12:12 pm:

Jack it and get some I-beams under it for support, get it onto a low tractor trailer, and get permits for the wide load and watch the height of the power lines that you cross.

House moving places do it all the time, but I don't think its as easy as they make it look...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 12:25 pm:

Piece of cake. Nail 2/12's across the the open span at a height that lets
your bottle jack get under it and up you go. Crib and keep raising until you
can drive a trailer under it, then jack it down onto said trailer and secure to
trailer by attaching hooks to inside wall studs and ratchet strapping to trailer.
Then it's off to wherever you want to place it.

Reverse process, but add in step of straightening, squaring building, suspending
it on beams 16" or so off the ground, so as to allow yourself room to pour a correct-
fitting slab and finish. Once concrete is cured, lower onto slab, secure J-bolt nuts
and washers through lower plate, and you are ready to rumble !

If there are rot issues, these are easily remedied while the structure is suspended
during the straightening/squaring stage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Friday, May 20, 2016 - 08:24 am:

I'm tempted to ask the poster if I can come look at his building and take pictures and such. Looks like it would make a neat place to store my T stuff, but I don't have anywhere to put it right now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Friday, May 20, 2016 - 09:55 am:

I'd get a group of High School kids and some tools over there and take it down, either stick by stick or in as large a section as possible. Taking photos and marking as you came down.
Transport via trailer or tuck to your location and put 'er back together.
Henry Ford did that with Greenfield Village.

You probably want a pad and some power anyway, so take it apart and rebuild it when you are ready.

JMO


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Friday, May 20, 2016 - 11:36 am:

What a cool building for a single car or T. Way to far from GA!!Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Friday, May 20, 2016 - 01:02 pm:

I've moved buildings a little larger then that garage but before you do any jacking or cutting you need to cross brace the inside in several directions. If it is not properly braced it will collapse on you. If you want to move it PM me and I will give you a run down on how to do it.

BEFORE YOU MAKE ANY OFFERS find out if the county has any moving permit requirements and be sure the route you take is wide enough to let the building pass through.

PERMITS MAY COST MORE THEN WHAT THE BUILDING IS WORTH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, May 20, 2016 - 11:14 pm:

With smaller garages (or with larger garages that you are moving short distances) you can back a trailer or flatbed truck into the garage first, then install your cross braces just above the flatbed and then jack up the garage under the braces. I've even seen this demonstrated on "This Old House" with a flatbed truck.

My own personal experience: ten years ago I had my two car garage moved just 25 feet into my backyard by a professional garage mover in Minneapolis so I could replace the concrete slab. It was much easier for the concrete guys to have the garage completely out of the way than just lifting the garage in place and cribbing the corners.

The garage mover is a true mechanical genius. He built his own custom trailer which is truly a work of art. It has outriggers that extend straight out from the sides of the trailer and extension arms that swing out from the outriggers. He has steel cleats that he attaches to the studs that rest on the extension arms of the trailer. The trailer has a number of hydraulic rams so he can raise and lower the garage in a very graceful manner. The trailer tongue can also extend and contract as well as pivot so he can wag the trailer like the tail of a dog. When not in use, everything on the trailer folds up for easy transport.

After unbolting the sill from the slab, lifting and moving the garage and setting it back down took 20 minutes - not a creak or crack during the whole process. (Before I hired him, I looked at other garages that he had moved including ones with stucco exteriors - absolutely no cracks or damage to the stucco.)

A month after the concrete was poured, he came back and set the garage on the new slab.

With the garage still in the air on the trailer and before setting it back down on the new slab, we replaced the rotten 2x4 sills on two sides of the garage with new, pressure treated 2x4s. I also performed additional restoration to the garage after it was set back down such as replacing some of the lower 1 x 12 sheathing and the bottom course of cedar shakes on two sides of the garage.

The mover used to buy and sell garages - he had a used garage lot on West Seventh Street in St. Paul. He said the best time to move garages around the Twin Cities was 4:00 in the morning when there was no traffic. He would actually haul garages right through downtown St. Paul early in the morning.

Trailer in all its compact glory:
2

Before:
1

Cleats and arms attached to studs:
15

Lift off:
3

4

Garage set down in backyard
5

Goodbye old driveway and slab:
6

Hello new driveway and slab:
7

8

Putting garage back where it belongs:
9

10

11

12

Note the hydraulic ram on the trailer tongue - this allows the trailer to pivot if needed, without having to move the tow vehicle. The trailer tongue can also extend and contract so the trailer can move forward or backward without moving the tow vehicle.
13

Finally at rest:
14

Finished product: new slab, new driveway, replaced rotten sheathing and cedar shakes where needed, new gutters all the way around, new roof, new garage door, new service door, fresh paint:
1

(Message edited by Erik_johnson on May 20, 2016)

(Message edited by Erik_johnson on May 20, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 09:55 am:

Erik, that's a pretty awesome rig he has there. I bet there's some pretty good money in doing that too, if you're good at it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 09:57 am:

I'm noticing a little bit of thread drift, maybe? I'll try to bring it back. Does anybody have any pictures of early garages? I mean like sheds specifically built for early automobiles, not just a stall in a barn that got cleaned out so they could park that new-fangled contraption in it. It would be kind of neat to see how people back then stored their cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 10:21 am:

Jared:

Look around in the town where you live and I'm sure you'll find some garages from the 1900s, 1910s and 1920s.

There are plenty of early residential garages all over Minneapolis and St. Paul where I live from modest "Model T" garages to large opulent garages of the upper middle class and wealthy. I also go to a lot of estate sales and there are still garages out there with wooden floors. I've been in many with fully finished interiors with plaster walls and radiator heat, etc.

If you want to see what the upper middle class and very wealthy car owners were building, see the books below:

"Garages: Country and Suburban" published by American Architect, 1911. You can download a PDF from Google Books:

http://books.google.com/books?id=Op8aAAAAYAAJ&dq=garages%20country%20suburban&pg =PP1#v=onepage&q&f=false

Here's another book on garages from 1911:

http://books.google.com/books?id=KpAFAAAAMAAJ&dq=garages%20country%20suburban&pg =PP1#v=onepage&q=garages%20country%20suburban&f=false


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