Best size open trailer for 26 Touring (or a polaris Ranger...)

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Best size open trailer for 26 Touring (or a polaris Ranger...)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Warren- Huntington, VT on Friday, May 20, 2016 - 09:41 pm:

I have a 26 Model T Touring that I am thinking of buying an open trailer in the event that I need to trailer it short distances. I'd also like the trailer to be capable of hauling my Polaris Ranger side by side. Anyone have any thoughts or suggestions on the best size and type of open trailer. I don't want to break the bank so will hopefully find a nice clean used one. I'd love to see pictures of what others are using.

Thanks
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 07:41 am:

Mike I have bought a 6 x 12 wire floor, single axle trailer that I use for short distance hauls. I paid $750 new for it and have adapted it for my needs. This trailer is ten years old, I hope this gives you food for thought.








Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 10:31 am:

I have 6 trailers for business and personal use from 10 to 24 feet long and after 44 years of hauling tractors mostly and having more than a few misses on the road always recommend a double axle and brakes. Your mileage may vary......:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 10:43 am:

Big Tex trailers are a pretty good bargain. A 16 ft landscape trailer will fit a model T very nicely, and is not as heavy as an actual flat bed car trailer. thanks Steve!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black SC/FL on Saturday, May 21, 2016 - 09:35 pm:

When my wife wanted a small trailer to haul her 4-wheeler, I got a 6 x 12 with a single 3500 lb axle, so I could also haul a T on it if necessary, or haul a golf cart. I later used it to haul my 15 project 500 miles from FL to SC. IMPORTANT: Hauling a car on a single axle trailer needs a decent tow vehicle--I used a Dodge dually. Also, that 6 ft wide mesh tailgate/ramp is ok around town, but needs to be removed for a long trip -- worse than hoisting a sail! Be safe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R. S. Cruickshank on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 09:43 am:

Wes Nelson--I used an open trailer for awhile for my 1912 depot hack. I stopped using it when I noticed the wind getting through the roof slats and tending to billow the roof material. Not a good thing. I went to an enclosed trailer but had to have it eight feet inside to ensure the hack roof cleared and would not hit during movement. Just my .02. Dick C.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Willie K Cordes on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 10:01 am:

An open trailer can be a little hard on hauling an open car. I prefer my closed trailer which is 18 foot by 8 foot. The extra width makes it easy to walk around the car when it is in the trailer.
It is also tall enough to load any of model T's with room to spare.
It also has slant V front which does help cut the wind when one is doing 70 plus down the highway.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 10:34 am:

"best" depends on a lot of things. Once you own a trailer, you may find that you use if for more than you ever thought, or you may find that it sits unused all but once or twice a year.

If you're going long-distance and plan to drive 65+, I would get 2 axles.

Ideal size depends on how much space you have to store it, and if you want to limit yourself to just Model Ts. 12' will haul a T just fine, but 16-18' will haul a more modern car too if you ever need to. (My 18' open trailer has a 46 Hudson Pickup on it right now)

I went through the same thing trying to decide what I wanted for an enclosed trailer. A 14' would handle a T with room to spare, but I would need 20' to be able to tie down a modern car. Just 4 more feet would squeeze in a 2nd Model T, but if I'm going that big, another 2 feet would provide room between them... so the trailer idea grew 12 feet and got a whole lot more expensive when I ordered a brand new 26'. Now I hope my truck is up to the task. :-) (should be fine, well within its weight rating, factory brake controller, and 403hp with all the HD factory coolers... 6mpg will have me wanting a diesel though)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 11:03 am:

Your tow vehicle should have a GCWR.

Deduct the actual weight of what you are planning to haul.

Deduct the actual curb weight of your tow vehicle.

What is left is the empty weight of the trailer you can pull.


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 12:55 pm:

I haul the Model T and a WWII Army jeep with a mchine gun trailer, the latter two at the same time, so I needed a 156ft long trailer. We looked at the stock wooden bed trailers that fit our budjet and my wife just didn't feel comfortable with the 8ft std width filing the entire lane behind our vehicle.
So we found a trailer manufacterer near by and had a 16ft 6ft wide wooden bed trailer with slide out ramps, spare tire, tandem axle and brakes for about $1800 out the door.

We put a little Harbor Freight 2500 lb winch mounted on the front rail and it loads and unloads anything we want to carry without having to drive it on and off. The wireless remote allows me to set at the wheel and winch myself on or off. Was less than $100 and is rated for 2500 lbs which is fine for my needs.

The tandem axle prevents swaying and is a nice feature with the brakes, but is a PITA for me to try to roll around my driveway unloaded with no vehicle. I figured out a way to do it, though with 4 wheel dollys. I can push the unloaded trailer behind my garage and out of sight on my paved pad.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Warren- Huntington, VT on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 08:24 pm:

Thank you for all your suggestions. I already have other trailers (snowmobile and motorcycle) so this trailer would only be used for the "T" or the Ranger. I have access to bigger, heavy duty trailers if I need one for long distances, or for something larger. I only anticipate using this trailer a few times a year for my Ranger to haul it Less than 30 miles from my house on secondary roads at speeds not to exceed 50mph. I will probably only haul the car on it once or twice a year up to maybe 40 miles at the most on secondary roads again. I think that a single axle trailer is what I'll be looking for. I wasn't sure if it would work or not but after seeing other guys using single axle trailers 12' in length, I think this will work just fine.

If I need an actual car hauler trailer, I have one that I can borrow from a close friend. Thanks again for the input.

Thanks Again!
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 10:20 pm:

Most people will insist you use a tandem axle trailer. I've been very happy with a 8' X 14' single axle trailer with a plank bed. I've owned it four years and keep up with the maintenance on it. Tire pressure, hitch, lights and wheel bearing maintenance are important. I never haul anything heavier than my '26 Tudor Sedan. I visually inspect it every time I use it.

I watch boats of all shapes and sizes that are 19' fiberglass with extremely heavy outboards go up and down the highways in Minnesota nearly every day. They've got smaller tires than I use hauling heavier loads. I seldom see tire problems but see a few bearing problems. Therefore I stress the need for maintenance.

But you need to make your own decision. Consider your load, distance to travel and worse case scenario and go for it.


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