King pin replacement

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: King pin replacement
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 12:40 pm:

First - I am cheap and don't like to spend money!

Taking that into account, I am thinking about replacing the king pins in the front end.
There is a bit of slop in the King pins when I move the wheel with my hands at the top and bottom.

I ordered the set from Langs expecting the new king pins to fit the bushings and having to adjust the thickness.
The bushing ID is about .005 too small so I need to fix the problem.

I know that I can purchase a reamer to resize the holes for about $100 but am wondering if there is a less expensive alternative.

I asked Autozone if they had a loaner and the guy looked at me like I had lost my mind so I guess that the answer is no.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 01:23 pm:

This is normal--the bushings have to be reamed to the pin AFTER installing in the axle. Some automotive machine shops have a Sunnnen hone with a long enough hone to do both at once (this is critical as they have to be in alignment with each other) and will probably do the job for you cheaper than buying the tool. Also, some other T folks around you might have the tool and lend it to you. Two options!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 01:24 pm:

Fred: First check the axle itself to see that it is OK. Second, after you install the new bushings in the spindles take them to a local auto machine shop. They should have a Sunnen hone and they can hone the bushings to the right size. Better than a ream job. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 01:30 pm:

Fred, i have a reamer you can borrow if you want.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 03:12 pm:

If you have an auto machine shop hone individually then they will not be aligned with each other. The special Stevens or KR Wilson reamers align both bushings and ream them at the same time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 06:04 pm:

Royce, If you notice in my posting about using a Sunnen hone I state that it has to be long enough to do both at once. And the honing will give you a more accurate finish, IMHO. However, the long hones are hard to find nowadays, so you may need to borrow John's reamer. An Auto Parts shop with a machine shop is becoming hard to find too!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 07:08 pm:

John

Thanks for the offer to borrow your reamer.

A couple things like a trip to Huston this week and a desire to participate in the Memorial Day Services next weekend make it more expedient to purchase one so I can do the work when I get home.

Fred


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Sunday, May 22, 2016 - 07:09 pm:

With a reamer you should never turn it backwards. If you do you will have an undersize reamer.

I use a 1/2 inch reamer to ream the bushings and a double cut file to fit the bushing flange to the axle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, May 23, 2016 - 06:32 am:

I use an expanding reamer, with a pilot so that it is long enough to engage with the other bush. Once one is reamed to size, the reamer is inserted from the other end to ream the second bush. A good machine shop is more likely to have this sort of reamer.

Hope this helps.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, May 23, 2016 - 07:54 am:

No where is the year of the car mentioned! There are several styles of kingpins!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Monday, May 23, 2016 - 09:01 am:

The car is listed in Fred's profile. It is a 1919.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, May 23, 2016 - 09:10 am:

I just ordered a reamer from Langs.
It will be here days before I return from the trip so I will be
able to finish the job before the Memorial Day Services.

Thanks for the offers and information about not turning it backwards.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, May 23, 2016 - 09:13 am:

Please notice that I called it Services because in my opinion it is not a celebration

It is remembering those that gave their lives and time for our freedom
.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Adkisson on Monday, May 23, 2016 - 05:21 pm:

something to consider...I replaced my King Pins on my 15 Roadster. If one takes a good look at the oiler on the top of the pin and the chance of oil ever getting to the bottom bushing...you will wonder how much oil it takes to the bottom bushing. While apart I drilled and threaded the dimple in the middle for a grease zerk or oil hole. Then made a threaded plug to screw in so it looks normal. Now the top bushing uses the original oil cup and the bottom gets oiled from the center of the pin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 10:43 am:

If the spindle bolt is made correctly, as Ford made them, there is a 1 inch slot from the hole, which allows the oil to run down to the bottom bushing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Adkisson on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 05:25 pm:

Didn't see a slot on my "15" anywhere to allow oil to flow to the lower bushing...mmmm, maybe I should have looked closer and cleaned better, it makes sense


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 05:51 pm:

Actually, the early pins (from '09 into '15) didn't have the oil slot; it was added later. When I made my first run of early kingpins from the print, I stuck to the print, but I added the slot and my second run has them.

Larry, that was your suggestion; remember?


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