Generator field coils

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Generator field coils
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Monday, May 23, 2016 - 09:24 am:

Hi all,

A few weeks ago Anthonie Boer from the Netherlands showed us how to rebuild the armature of the Model T generator. I tried it and it went well.
The generator I am trying to rebuild has also a toasted field coil and need a new field coil assembly.
I know they are available but I like to rebuild it myself.
There for I am looking for some information about the number of winding each coil have.
Is the polarity of the field N-S-N-S? Does it mater where the N and S are located in the generator body?
Does the coil winding go left, the next coil winding go right, the next left and the fourth go right?

Thanks
Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Adkisson on Monday, May 23, 2016 - 05:12 pm:

One has to disassemble the original counting turns and direction of the winding's...match wire size and type etc...A motor winding shop may be able to turn the coils for you and suggest the proper insulating shims etc...they will even dip it when you are done.
Pictures during disassemble...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Monday, May 23, 2016 - 06:58 pm:



The location of N/S in the case is relevant to the location of pigtails so yes, I guess it does matter.

The coils are all wound in the same direction. The interconnection between the coils alternate.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, May 23, 2016 - 08:39 pm:

I bet by time you buy the wire and every thing else you will have more into the job then just buying new ones. You should not reuse the old wire as the varnish will have gotten brittle and probley is coming off at this point. Varnished magnet wire is not cheap.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 07:03 am:

Thanks for your advice,

Mark I know this but I like to try.
A coil with 55m of new varnished magnet wire 1.2mm diameter is 23,- ( about $25.00)
New field coil assy. is $49.95 + shipping and taxes will make it about $75.00 .

Ken do you mean outside wire on outside wire than inside on inside and last outside on outside for the alternated interconnection between the coils.
Do you know how many winding has each coil??

Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 07:40 am:

I'm done here. After being chastised for trying to help someone else, I give up trying to supply details. Contact Ron "The Coilman". He should have all the specifics you need.

Good day and good bye.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 12:42 pm:

Ken,

????


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andre Valkenaers on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 01:14 pm:

Don't care Jerry,
I will find it out my self. As soon as I have an other bad field coil I will take it apart, the one I am willing to replace is destroyed due to a broken bearing on the back of the armature that make the armature run in the field.

During the total rebuild I will make a few photos and will post the result on the forum.

It will take some time so be patient.

Andre
Belgium


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 02:51 pm:

Andre
I don't understand Ken's being upset either. He did post a nice photo of some very good-looking coils, but can't tell from the picture if one set is wound clockwise and the next counter-clockwise--or are they all wound the same direction.
Those of us living in the States don't understand how much more difficult it is for folks overseas to get parts and the costs of importation fees and VAT too.
Andre, this is a project you can do, although not a picnic. You'll need to make a form to wind the coil around and you'll need to do it very neatly; like a machine would do! This can be done, but one does have to be in a good relaxed mood. There are two ways to determine the amount of wire to use; by number of winds or by length of wire. I would go for the length of wire, as you may not wind the coil as tightly as a machine would. But, you need to be pretty close for the coil to fit in the case! Size of wire is important, but also important is the insulation type. "Enameled" wire (Invented, BTW, by A C Gilbert company, who brought you Erector sets and American Flyer Trains) comes with different types of insulation--I used quotes around enameled as often nowadays the coating is something else, like epoxy. There are different properties for the insulation, one is temperature to melt it; there's a type known as "easy solder" that melts at a low temperature to make soldering it very easy--I would not recommend it for this use. I sometimes rewind motors for those American Flyer Trains and I use a wire engineered for space satellites that I picked up at a surplus store cheap (I am using wire in the #25 and smaller sizes)--it has to be scraped off to solder, as it won't even melt at soldering temperatures. The train motors can get pretty warm, and I need all the "help" I can get when rewinding!
I would imagine there is enough manufacturing over there that you can find a local supply. If you have surplus stores, you might try there. I was in Silicone Valley when I accidentally found the wire I'm using. Since then I have found internet suppliers too.
After you wind the coils, you wrap them with bias-ply tape, found in fabric stores and then coat them with glypnal. Good luck, let us know how it goes!
BTW, My Grandfather Emigrated from Belgium, so I'm 1//4 Flemish. Family name was Cabus, but I think the name has died--no boys born! There is still family there, but I don't know their names.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 05:13 pm:

Andre: I do not know if you have electric motor repair shops there, but they can turn you on to what you need. Most are helpful and will give you some pointers. Look one up. They will have the wire and tape you need, may drip and bake the coils for you too. Dan
P.S. Not talking about automotive motors, industrial motor repair.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Adkisson on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 05:18 pm:

P.S. Ken has erased his profile in the forum...Not good for the forum...for the average JOE..."kiss" Keep It Simple Stupid...if someone has a layman's terms for something that everyone can understand...more power to him...look at all the old timers that kept the T's running on hay wire and nails...I don't need a timing wheel to set the timer when I can see the piston position and hear my coil buss...yes, I use a white paint pencil for timing marks! laziness is the Mother of Invention more times then not


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Adkisson on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 05:20 pm:

Right on DAN


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