Exhaust leak: an urgent fix?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Exhaust leak: an urgent fix?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 01:11 pm:

Apparently I didn't apply enough goo when I put things together on the roadster. Sounds like a leak around the exhaust manifold. There are other things I want to get done right away. I suspect it will be OK to drive this way until I can get a round tuit, but I'll ask the experienced mechanics just to be sure. What say you?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 01:17 pm:

I've been driving my 1971 Plymouth GTX with leaks on both exhaust manifolds for three years now with no ill effects (other than embarrassment from the noise).

Hey, some things can't be rushed! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 01:27 pm:

I would fix it ASAP before the manifold is ruined or a chunk of the block goes missing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 01:31 pm:

Well, that pretty much covers the whole spectrum of experiences!

I have to admit that the leaks on the GTX are minor and seal up once the manifolds get hot.

I defer to Royce's superior Model T knowledge. :-)

(Message edited by cudaman on May 24, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 02:10 pm:

I have the exact same problem Steve, and I kinda' suspect that one of the steel glands should have been trimmed down a bit, as I used brand new copper gaskets. It's just one cylinder that I can hear leaking, and interestingly enough, after I start the engine cold and let it run for just a minute or two, the sound of that one cylinder leaking is gone! As Royce says though, I have this nagging worry that because it's just one spot that leaks, I just know I've got to do something about it before damage is done. After all, that's fire leaking thru' that one little spot, right?

Also Steve, and this is just personal opinion here, but I really don't believe that any amount of "goo" as you mentioned is a factor at all. I think that a proper exhaust manifold gasket, properly installed and compressed is sufficient, and the "goo" just makes things more difficult the next time the manifold needs to be removed & replaced. FWIW,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 02:16 pm:

Perhaps the gland rings are too tall and are keeping the copper rings from compressing sufficiently?

Worth a look.... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 02:34 pm:

I would avoid goo if possible. The only reason goo would be indicated is if there was previous damage or severe rust pits around the gland / ring area.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 02:39 pm:

Right Mark. That's why I said I'm thinking that there's one of them that probably should have been "trimmed down a bit"! I actually held both manifolds up to the side of the block (together and separately) without gaskets to be sure the exhaust port glands were not too long, and they looked okay to me, but maybe I didn't look close enough!

Makes me think of a personal quote that I like that I saw in one of our forum "T" guys profiles where he quoted his dad as saying,..."If you don't have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over again?" Sure makes sense,......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 02:56 pm:

Thanks Royce! I guess my thoughts were that you never need "goo" to seal an exhaust manifold, especially considering the heat involved, but I forgot about things such as rust pits and such. My thought was that any "goo" would just burn up anyway, but in the case of rust pits, "high-temp goo" would no doubt work, because the gasket compressed flush against a "goo"-filled rust pit would prevent any direct contact of actual fire to the "goo" at all, right?

As an "aside", I believe it's Permatex that makes a very high temp sealant ("goo") that would be great for this. Very expensive,.....like about $12.00 for a tiny super-glue sized tube, but hey,....if it works, right?

Okay,....sorry,.....didn't mean to deviate so far from the "What did you do today" topic of which this thread is about,....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 02:57 pm:

Ooops! This "IS" the exhaust leak thread,....need more coffee!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 03:08 pm:

Harold, I like the saying "If it was worth doing once it is worth doing twice".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 03:59 pm:

Royce, you've hit upon the reason for the goo. Rust pits. That's why I used it before. I applied Permatex hi-temp RTV and it was fine. I doubt that the rings are too tall. I used the standard rings before with no trouble. I'll fix this before I do any more driving.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 04:42 pm:

Yup! You and Royce are way ahead of me Steve! That's the stuff I was talking about but I couldn't quite remember the whole name. Permatex hi-temp RTV. Pretty "spendy" though, huh Steve? All I could remember was that it was Permatex and came in a blister card because the tiny little tube was so very small.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 04:58 pm:

If the manifold and block are straight and smooth, and the rings are not too long, use the copper round gaskets. Torque to about 30 ft lbs. After you warm up the engine torque again. The copper should crush and seal all the way across.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 05:09 pm:

Use Permatex "The Right Stuff" on the rings. It will not leak.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 05:55 pm:

Fixed. All is well. The problem was that I didn't get all the rings properly lined up and into their holes. Now they're in.

Norm, the manifold and block are straight but they're not both smooth. The block has rust pits. Hence the sealer.

Harold, this is the Hi-temp stuff I used. Supposed to be good to 650. Cost me $4.84.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 06:01 pm:

Steve, that appears to be a permatex product.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 06:12 pm:

Glad to hear it's fixed, hope you are able to do lots of driving and touring with the roadster this year! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 07:46 pm:

Believe Steve!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Thursday, May 26, 2016 - 11:09 am:

I saw the photos you posted of a block a while back, and if this is the same block, I don't understand why you didn't get the manifold area surfaced!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Tuesday, May 31, 2016 - 06:18 am:

Steve already solved his exhaust leak and that is great. But, while looking for the thread size for an acetylene generator, I ran across the following and I thought it might help someone in the future if they did a Google search on exhaust leak and find this thread.

. The Restoration Supply Company ( www.RestorationStuff.com ) on page 61 of their catalog has the following item:



It sounds like it could be helpful in some cases. Specifically if the block or manifold had pits. If the engine is already out of the car -- taking the part(s) to a machine shop and having the area resurfaced would be best. But if the engine was running well and the tour season was just starting -- it would be worth a look.

There is a risk -- as Royce points out -- if it started leaking you can do a lot of damage in a short period of time. So if used, it would have to be monitored. Ok, if your hearing is normal - you would hear the leak. But for some with partial hearing loss -- they would need to monitor the condition of the repair and stop driving if it ever started leaking again.

Respectfully added,

Hap l9l5 cut off


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