OT Anyone Into Early Wooden Boats?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: OT Anyone Into Early Wooden Boats?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Monday, May 30, 2016 - 01:35 pm:

http://forums.aaca.org/topic/277591-early-marine-acetylene-brass-searchlight/



Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 11:03 am:

Received light this morning and found out it was the smaller 4 inch version, love it, just wished I could afford to fully restore it to it's former glory. What a little jewel it must have been.
Howard Dennis


http://forums.aaca.org/topic/277715-brass-lamp-restorer-sought/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 04:55 pm:

Howard
Yes I like wooden boats and old gas engines to power them


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 06:31 pm:

Better yer, Wooden boats and steam engines and boilers to power them!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Tillstrom 30 miles N of Memphis TN on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 09:38 pm:

Frank Harris who used to post regularly to this forum used to have a steam boat like the one above (that may be his). He posted once sharing his experience with it and I think he said a small bag of charcoal would give him enough heat to play for a good bit. It was a very cool boat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Christopher McCulley on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 09:53 pm:

Actually, my next project planned is a steam boat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 10:27 pm:

Steam is another passion of mine although I've only delved into it with scale models. Now that it has been brought up were there ever any full size steam powered speedboats in the early 20th century?

Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach, CA on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 10:41 pm:

We have an 1886 steamboat with a self generating carbide lamp from the Nile river area. The engine is a 1910 and the seats are genuine diamond tufted leather. The water tube boiler is brand new, 40 hours total time.


The reason the red and green port and starboard lights are canted is that nautical law states that a red light shall be displayed to the left (port) and a green light to the right. (starboard). These lights shall be visible from the front and to 15 degrees abaft the beam or in other words 15 degrees past the middle of the lamp. That is why the lamp lenses are canted in the brass lamp shown at the front of this posted string.


Our boat is a steam powered launch and runs on propane, wood, charcoal or fire logs.



Here is a picture of our self generating carbide navigation lamp on the bow and our carbide powered searchlight behind it. Note that a white light shines forward and that the red sidelight is rotated 15 degrees as is the green one on the other side. We have a flood light mounted up high.










lights


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach, CA on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 10:45 pm:

Here is our 21 foot long steamboat under full power at speed at Big Bear Lake.


Tink


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 01:38 am:

Gary,
That's Dick Vennerbeck's boat on the Sacramento Delta in 2008. It's been a while since I've been to a steamboat meet, but I think it's a Rose Hull, which was copied quite a bit, so it's likely Fank's is one too--it certainly looks like it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach, CA on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 04:48 pm:

Dick's boat is a 23 foot long Elliot Bay yacht tender. Our boat is a 20'6" Rose. Our engine is a rebuilt 1910 double acting steam engine with a brand new 50 square foot water tube boiler. We're selling our steamboat for health reasons and our famous #22 Speedster too :~(


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 05:59 pm:

Frank,
Thanks for setting that right. Sorry to hear that you're having to sell your boat, someone is going to get a really nice boat--and a nice speedster too. I looked all over my computer for a picture of our old boat, the Mikahala; wish I still had her. . . She was/is (I understand she's still around, somewhere back east)a 16' double ender, oak frames, cedar planking and mahogany rub rail top decks. Had a Blackstaff-Woods steeple compound engine and their water-tube boiler too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach, CA on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 07:59 pm:

Sounds nice Dave, did you run her on briquettes or cut wood?

I would like to sell Tinkerbelle on this site's classified section but they say things have to be T cars or parts :<(

It would cost $35,000 to build it today and I am asking $18,000 with the trailer and full cover, it's a steal !


tink






cover


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 08:55 pm:

My neighbor with incredible talent restored a 65 foot tug enough to move it from SD to Warrenton last year for a lady who bought it to live on in Portland.
It took 10K in diesel fuel. The tug was 1915 vintage with the only way to reverse was kill the engine make a few adjustments then start with air pressure. He did not have quite enough to start the engine in reverse but it slowed enough to not take out the dock in Warrenton.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach, CA on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 09:35 pm:

That's the way the old fishing boats worked in San Pedro when I was a boy. They had huge three cylinder Atlas engines with no reverse gearing. They had two cam shafts and a shifting mechanism that activated the forward cam for clockwise rotation for going forward and the backing up aft cam for counterclockwise rotation when slowing down and or backing up. It has four valves per cylinder and each cam runs two valves. It took about 30 seconds to shift from forward to reverse. Some had a small engine with a transmission for cranking the large engine either clockwise or counterclockwise. The forward running valves are closed shut when running the engine backwards and the other ones are locked for going forward. Some used compressed air for starting.



backwards


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 09:56 pm:

Frank,
Nope, vaporizing burner, like a Stanley! I much prefer wood with oil in a boat though!
Yes, that's a steal, but way beyond my budget! Did you ever bring her up to the fall meet at the B& W on the Sac. Delta?
Paul, I rammed a dock once when the compound didn't want to reverse--it happens! My boat was so small, it was a non-event!
I found one picture, taken with, I think, Scott Nichols (original owner & designer)at the helm. After I bought the boat I changed the stack to a maroon with black band at the top. Small boat, but could be & was sailed on SF Bay!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 10:46 am:

I was on a thousand foot cruse ship docking in Mexico early in the morning. While backing into there docking area it hit a concrete dock behind the ship destroying it. The ship threw docked boats backward on the concrete dock when power on the ship changed to forward. It punched a three foot hole in the back of the ship you knew nothing about until the next day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnCodman on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 08:17 pm:

Kinetic Energy equals half the mass times the velocity squared. A docking cruise ship doesn't have much velocity, but it has a hell of a lot of mass.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les VonNordheim on Sunday, June 12, 2016 - 01:35 am:

Paul Vitko, we were also on a cruse ship in Mexico and seen the damaged concrete dock. Heard they had to weld a patch on the back of the ship before it could leave.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Sunday, June 12, 2016 - 07:37 am:

Our cabin was near the back of the ship. Slept through every thing without knowing what happened. New ship every one and his brother had to OK the repair before leaving.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Sunday, June 12, 2016 - 03:11 pm:

Just listed the searchlight on eBay

http://www.ebay.com/itm/122013728211?ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m15 86.l2649

Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ned Protexter on Sunday, June 12, 2016 - 06:34 pm:

I just bought a 1963 Century Coronado. Ill get some pictures when I pick it up later this summer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Sunday, June 12, 2016 - 11:30 pm:

Tried installing a marine Model T engine but it didn't work out so well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael in northeast Indiana on Monday, June 13, 2016 - 08:59 am:

Looking at the photos, I don't consider my boats old enough. My wooden boat is a 1952 dual cockpit Dunphy runabout with a Mercury Mark 20. My other old boat is fiberglass, it's a 1973 Westerly Longbow sailboat up on Lake Erie.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, June 13, 2016 - 01:20 pm:

Michael,
My old boat was built in the 60s (maybe 1958, I forget)BUT it was built to the 1880s standards; oak frames with cedar planking copper riveted to the frames. It was a thing of beauty and I still regret having to let it go. (Nope, did not have the two best days in a boat owner's life--the day you buy it and then the day you sell it. )


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