How fast are the T's expected to go on regular tours?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: How fast are the T's expected to go on regular tours?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Thursday, June 02, 2016 - 04:59 pm:

How fast are the T's expected to go on regular tours?

I am breaking in a new restoration. So far the comfortable speed, according to my phone app speedometer, is 30 mph. It goes 32-35 ok-ish, but something rattles in the front so I slow it down to stop the rattle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Thursday, June 02, 2016 - 05:14 pm:

On the small local tours here, we run with everybody all in a line at about 25-30mph.

On the large MTFCI tours with 200+ cars and everyone going at their own pace, 35-38mph is pretty typical.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Thursday, June 02, 2016 - 06:18 pm:

Robert

Your road speed will be fine, most tours don't do a parade in a line, travel is lone or one to three T's at a time.

Road condition sets the pace.

Dirt road




Now on smooth hardtop, ah, let the T run :-)



Note the max speed registered at the top of the screen, careful, that kind of travel is mixed with scary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike conrad on Thursday, June 02, 2016 - 06:39 pm:

I would think to fix the rattles, unless your driving a TT, rattles at 30 is not a good thing, your car is trying to tell you something.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, June 02, 2016 - 06:46 pm:

Good advice! The average T is not a hot rod. It does get tempting to speed things up and peg both levers. Not a good idea.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Thursday, June 02, 2016 - 07:05 pm:

Robert-
It doesn't make much difference how fast you go.

What is more important is how fast you can stop.

Don't drive faster than you can safely stop. I'm with Dan, 35-40 is comfortable on a good, uncongested road.

: ^ )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Thursday, June 02, 2016 - 07:13 pm:

My T loves me when we go about 35. We're both happy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Poane on Thursday, June 02, 2016 - 07:15 pm:

Thanks for your input and advice.

The rattle sounds like it is a loose side light or windshield. Something like that. It does not sound like it is from the drive train.

Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Thursday, June 02, 2016 - 07:34 pm:

LOL. My 19 hack loves 30 mph until we come to a corner. :-)

When it sees a turn it begins to get shy and when the corner shows up it panics and wants to lean a bit too much.
Since I listen to my T I slow down when a we get to a turn.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 01:25 am:

It all depends on the road, traffic and a lot more on how well your car is put together and what IT likes.

We're getting ready here for the Montana 500. Everything is checked twice and adjusted and balanced and if you aren't averaging close to 50 MPH for the 500 miles your at the bottom of the list.

Most organized tours drive around the 30 to 40 mark but many I've been on the guys pair up with slower cars and others with the faster cars both going their comfortable speed.

The thing that always bothers me is when a 30mpher backs up a lot of traffic then some modern cars try passing a few T's which can cause some scary times. The other is when you see a hill coming up and the car in front slows or doesn't open the throttle to gain some speed before the hill and causes the other cars to lug their engines behind them.

That's the fun of touring with other T's. I don't think any two cars are the same and each have their own sweet speed.

Just enjoy the drive and watch for traffic behind you whatever speed you drive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Peterson College Place, WA on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 11:14 am:

The trouble with the national tours is that many drive too fast. It's as if everyone has forgotten that it's the driving we are there for, not the destination. Or everyone's trying to impress the others on how fast their car can go. Not to criticize the national tours too much, though, some of my best memories are these big tours and all of the great people there. I am sad when they are too far away or my work schedule interferes with "driving Miss Daisy!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 11:28 am:

What I appreciate about the regional and national tours is that they provide maps or route instructions so that you can go at your own pace or team up with a few others who have the same comfort zone.

Whatever speed you and your T are comfortable with, watch your mirrors to avoid irritating the folks we want to share the road with. Some states have laws about pulling over if you are backing up traffic but good sense and common courtesy should be our guide. Drive like you want others to appreciate our cars and hobby.

Our group has a tour this weekend that will be faced with some 55 MPH roads - the event planners do their best to avoid these but choices are limited for our destination. We encourage folks to spread out and watch mirrors to minimize our impact on modern traffic. It's called being good neighbors.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Idaho Falls on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 11:33 am:

On the two National tours I attended most of the cars seemed to be doing 40 or 45. We would start early and travel at 30 to 35. Several folks said they were glad we were going slower and preferred to travel at our speed. Sometimes we feel obligated to keep up even though there is usually plenty of time to get there.
On other tours I noticed people racing to a destination and wondering why there wasn't more planned to do there. It took me several years to find comfort in driving slow. The cars have had far less problems since then. Modern traffic is another reason many of us feel a need to drive faster. I seek out quiet roads when I can.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 07:05 pm:

When I got my '15 Touring about 15 years ago, I did all the things I could to make it go faster -- head, cam, advanced timing gear, yada, yada. Now that I'm 15 years older, I still do most of those things to my cars' engines, but it's for better hill climbing power, not higher top speed. These days, I usually putt along at 35-40.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 10:18 pm:

On any Model T drive you need to keep one eye in your rear view mirror. Too many T's worldwide have been rear ended by a modern car or truck. This is especially important if you are driving by yourself or last in a line of Model T's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 02:38 am:

I like 30-38 mph. 30 mph is a really nice "enjoy the scenery" pace. 38 mph is a nice speed to feel like you're in a hurry, even though it won't get you to the ice cream stop noticeably quicker than 30 mph will.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 03:12 pm:

I couldn't have said it any better than Dale Peterson or Richard Eagle said it! Frankly, I try to avoid driving my Model T's faster than 35mph or my Model A any faster than 45mph. Of course, there are times, what with modern traffic and all, it becomes necessary to do whatever necessary to avoid becoming a traffic hazard. I just don't understand why there are those that only want to drive on a tour as fast as their Model T will go,....I just don't believe our "T's were designed to do that.

I firmly believe that our Model T's compare with our human bodies. Yes, we can run, and some of us can run pretty fast, however, even the best athletes can only run very fast for a comparatively short distance, or, some can run just "fairly fast" for a somewhat longer distance. BUT, no human body, not even the best athletes, can run very fast, for a very long distance! And I think Model T Fords are the same way,....and if you keep trying to drive them as fast as they will go for any great distance, well,....they'll only do that for just so long, and something's got to "give". (....think main, or rod bearing knock, or worse yet, a thrown rod or broken crank or both!) But then again, if you absolutely just love pulling your engine out, and rebuilding it again (or like me, having it rebuilt) then "have at it"! Pull both "ears" down and let that little engine just roar it's guts out 'till something breaks!

Yeah, tours are fun, but just let me know where the tour will end up, and I'll drive 30-35mph, maybe with ya', or maybe behind ya', but whatever the case, I'll see ya' when I get there!

As they say, "YMMV",......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 03:17 pm:

Okay, one more thing,.....I realize that careful balancing certainly helps, in fact, I think that's the biggest factor in building a good and successful Montana 500 Model T, however, really good balancing is pretty difficult to achieve (read EXPENSIVE) and out of the question for most of us!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Manuel, Lafayette, La. on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 03:22 pm:

I like slow. Usually putt along at 30 or so and enjoy all the thumbs up and smile for the cameras. If I'm in a hurry I don't drive the T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Bishop, San Diego on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 04:23 pm:

I'm one of those people who had to be stupid before I learned.
Had a nice running '17 touring that ran very smoothly at 30ish. First local tour I went on, everyone seemed to be going about 50 or faster, especially the leader. Since I was by myself, I couldn't read the directions so tried to keep up with everyone so I wouldn't get lost. Pretty much pinned both levers. First I lost the brakes, then a couple of loud noises in the engine with resulting power loss. Then the mag quit, and the car started overheating. Etc, etc, etc. Barely made it back home before all the oil gushed out the bottom of the engine!
Luckily we have a very generous, kind, and talented person in our club named Norm Kling who rebuilt the engine and made me put Rockies on the car. It now runs better than ever, but I've learned my lesson and enjoy the drive more. I'm also very selective of the tours I now go on. I've made some enemies in our local club because I "don't support the club by going on the local tours", but if some of them are going to be going 40-50+ mph, that's not enjoyable to me. But my car is still running great and I enjoy driving it at my speed. Several of our last few local tours have ended with as many as 3 out of 4 cars on the trouble truck. Like Harold said, excessive speed for a T? Don't know, but it seems to happen to people who know a lot more about the mechanics of their T's than I do. I'm sure mine would be one of them if I tried to keep up. Think I'll just enjoy the scenery and appreciate the drive rather than trying to keep up!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eubanks, Powell, TN on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 09:03 am:

Depends on where you are, hills, mountains or flatland. Where there are hills, you have to get a running start which means up to 45 or so to not have to go back to low gear. Flatland allows you to run a constant slower speed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R. S. Cruickshank on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 09:26 am:

What is wrong with a few rattles? On our tours with the local HCCA, we try to keep the speed at 30--35. It is very comfortable for most of us in the T but I know that several speedsters and larger cars like to get it on up to 50 plus. With my three T's, the rattles come at different speeds and since I know where they are, this rattle speedometer works every time. At 25 hardly any rattle, at 30 there is a symphony of rather pleasant sounds, at 35 I sense the end of comfort and beyond 35 I START TO RATTLE! No need for a speedometer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 10:24 am:

I have my own built-in rattle speedometer. I have a lens implant to replace a cataract. Above about 38 mph in the T, with the windshield down (it's ALWAYS down!) the lens starts to vibrate and my vision goes blurry. So I don't go that fast!

I hate touring in a long snake, or like circus elephants (nose to tail). Most of my touring is with HCCA, and the various brass-era cars are happy at various speeds. We all have instructions, and we go at our own pace. If a Pierce-Arrow catches up to me, I let it go by. If I catch up to a Curved-Dash Oldsmobile, it lets me go by. There's always plenty left for everybody at the ice cream stop.

Sometimes 4 or 5 of us will find ourselves together for a while, and that's fine. We'll soon get separated by a long hill or a stop sign. But a long snake pushes slow cars too hard and aggravates drivers whose cars are a bit faster, especially on hills. Snakes really infuriate modern drivers who have legitimate appointments and have allowed ample time to get where they're going at normal modern road speeds, only to find themselves stuck behind an impassable string of old crocks (and their even-older cars) cluttering up the road.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 10:43 am:

Nice and slow. Thirty, no more that 35 mph. On most tours we travel such beautiful and peaceful back roads, farm country, etc. it a shame to zip through it. Life is too fast as it is and I, for one, am in this hobby to enjoy a slower, seemingly more peaceful way of life. Most tours we've been on, folks go far too fast. On our first tour, we tried to keep up but then said the heck with it. I felt like I was beating up my T AND missing out on the nice drive. Now, we go at our own pace. We catch up eventually and enjoy the ride.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eyssen - Abilene TX on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 08:57 pm:

Fast enough not to miss coffee breaks or lunch stops:-)


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