OK, how about THIS Roadster for sale on Model T Haven?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: OK, how about THIS Roadster for sale on Model T Haven?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 11:12 pm:

Looks liek Mark has a new one up since my last post. I really like the looks of this 1922. Everything from my beginners eyes seems tight: right straight windshield, low cowl and low radiator. I THINK the right body. thoughts on this one? He's asking 4200 but I'll see if I can get it for less if you guys think this looks alright. As always your experience and help is appreciated.
http://www.modelthaven.com/cars-pre/1922-model-t-roadster/category/101


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 11:17 pm:

That car actually has a 1923 body - high bead on the seat back with the revised trunk.

Since you are willing to purchase a Model T so far away from home, I suggest doing a national search on Craigslist instead.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, June 03, 2016 - 11:42 pm:

Frankly, I liked the other one better. I think this one would be better called a '23 and put the slanted windshield and steel firewall in it. Notice, this body does have the holes in the sides for the top supports.
It also is a doable project. But?????


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 02:02 am:

Matthew,
Didn't someone here mention his relatives '15 roadster project, up near you? Check that one out!
And look around near you too, craig's list, etc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 02:20 am:

When it's done, it could look like mine. We started with one in similar condition, except was complete enough to actually run. My father and I spent several years and about ten grand doing a complete and thorough restoration in memory of my grandfather.

During the restoration, we each bought a roadworthy Model T to help keep our interest in the hobby and our local club. Over the years, I've seen so many people come and go from the hobby because they try to tackle too big of a project and never get to experience the joy of driving a decent Model T before they lose interest.

Once again, the Model T Haven car is clearly a collection of parts thrown together to make a sale. Look at the paint work on the crude plywood firewall. It really gives that "patina" look.

The body, is the same as mine. It's kind of a transitional style that was made in the spring and summer of '23, before the '24 body style came out. It has the "one man" top, slant windshield and a low hood. The included turtle deck is correct for this body. A '22 would have a different, shorter one with two latches on the lid. As you can see on my car, '17-'22 style front fenders are correct for this body, hood and radiator.

It will cost about the same to restore this car or the '15. The '15 will have a more comfortable seating position if you have long legs and it will be worth more when completed. My '23 is my favorite only because of the time that I spent tinkering on it with my grandfather as a child and restoring with my father as an adult. He seating position is kind of cramped for my 6'4" frame. I prefer the seating position of any Model T made prior to the oval gas tank and the resulting lower seat.

I don't believe that you'll be able to throw a few hundred bucks and a bunch of elbow grease at either car and end up with something that you can drive on tours. Each are several thousand dollars away from being roadworthy. Hope this helps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 03:20 am:

Well said, and well done Eric H!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 04:19 am:

Can you weld, repair sheet metal, do glass work, upholstery work? Are you a pattern maker and 1st class woodworker? How about electrician and a machinist and mechanic? Sandblast, and Painter? To say nothing of the endless buying of every small piece for the car. From the pics every piece of the car would need a compete rebuilding and then an extensive cosmetic refurbishing and refinish. For the money shop the market awhile, you will find a driver that a cosmetic freshening will spruce up. Your retirement saving will rest easy and thank you for it....Best of luck!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 04:44 am:

LoL what? "Can you weld and do 'X' work?" No i can't but i don't let it stop me doing it anyway. And neither should other people.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 08:49 am:

Both are assembled cars. Perhaps not by Mark but still neither are what their presented as. I'm not sure of your abilities but they'd better be numerous + deep pockets are required. There's nothing in your area? I'd sure look around more before I shot for either of these cars. I don't want to pay the shipping never mind years of work. Read Eric's posting a few times your getting into his boat and he's been there done that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 08:56 am:

There's a really nice non starter 19 touring in north adams ma that may still be available. It only needs a look over the driveline. Cosmetics are nice but older.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 09:02 am:

Once again, thanks for all of the responses guys. It's true that I am mainly looking for a nearly everything original to the car project that won't take too much work to get running on the road at least around town. I like my mismatch chassis but really want a more complete correct car. I did send Spencer a message in regards to the 15 he has available. My grandfather keeps changing his mind on whether or not he is ready to let his 24 go yet. I can't blame him; it's the last of the T's he did.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 09:15 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 09:18 am:

If you are willing to do the research, I'd really think that one over. Everything Eric mentioned above is true. Mark has thrown together a pile of parts, and some may not be correct for what you think this car might be.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 09:19 am:

Be patient and shop around.

Decent driver-quality cars can be found in the $7-9k range.

I just bought this one for $7k. Nice car that needs quite a bit of mechanical work to be safe and reliable, but it doesn't need a full-resto.



I put a "wanted 26-27 Model T roadster" ad on Craigslist and the seller contacted me after hearing about my ad from a friend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 10:48 am:

I also found, over the course of a few years 3 cars in my area which is not especially known for T's. That's 3 I bought & sold over time. Probably looked at 6 or so over that time which I had no interest in. Keep looking if you want a runner. They are out there. And in the $ 6/7 area Derek mentions. Not knocking Model T Haven just saying a runner is probably a lot closer than you think.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 12:14 pm:

You keep mentioning your Grandfather's '24. If you get it, he really hasn't "lost" it, it is still in the family. You could even have an arrangement where he could drive it around now & then.
Not to knock Model T Haven, but most of what he has is "put together" to sell AND it's all a LONG ways away from you. I don't know why you keep looking there when something is likely quite close to you. Your search reminds me of my friends' search decades ago for a Model A. We drove all over, hours away, looking at some really neat and some really junker As (Neatest one was a coupe with twin sidemounts, original owner; they bought it when they lived in Hawaii--I still wonder what happened to that car that was "not for sale.")From a chance conversation in town, I found him a Model A that was just blocks from his house--in fact his backyard backed up to the property it was on! We got it running and drove it around the block to his house. So keep looking around you, something is likely hiding right under your nose!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 04:04 pm:

I was perusing eBad last night and thinking of your posts. I saw two model Ts in those price ranges that were better, more solid, and closer to running (probably). I think both of them had no reserve, but one never knows how high the bidding might go? And I think both were closer to you (you are still in New York?) than model T Haven is. I like Mark, and what he does with model Ts. He performs a good service that helps save cars, parts, and helps other people restore and maintain their Ts. But I think you can do better than either of these cars you have asked about.

One advantage to dealing with Mark. You know who he is. He is well known as a model T person. And he will likely help you out more in the future. That alone is worth a few more bucks buying his junk-pile over someone else's junk-pile.
If you buy from someone that you know nothing about through Craig's list or eBad? You really don't know what you may run into. But either of those, watched for awhile, could find you a better deal closer to home.
The North-Eastern states have a lot of antique cars for sale (Seems like every time I find a really good deal I want? That is where it is, $2000 away.) Local clubs could likely help you find one.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 05:50 am:

As kep so sweetly put it, you should try to do any sort of job on the car yourself. If you cannot, you can get into a real mess starting with a bolted together basket case. My post was not meant to discourage but to direct thought to the various types of work skills needed to rebuild an old car. IF you have the hands, then go for any vehicle you desire. Best of luck!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Cataldo, Rhode Island on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 09:06 pm:

You should first join a local club. The club members will help steer you to the car for you. The cars your posting are restorations for an advanced restorer and require a lot of money.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 11:08 pm:

My 24 touring came with a poorly executed Home Depot wood job, rear doors welded shut, rusted out holes in three of the four quarter panels, a set of top irons that were good on one side and pretty rusted out on the other side, and new seat springs. It did run and drive. One big benefit I got from it was it motivated me to join the Lone Star T's Model T club. I made all the wood using the Mel Miller plans, bought a Lincoln wire welder, a South Bend lathe, an air compressor and a set of air tools, new rear center panel, patch panels below the door on both sides, a set of top irons and a set of used Ruckstell parts at Chickasha. I already owned a table saw and drill press. I also rebuilt the Ruckstell axle and engine and replaced the transmission with one I had on hand. Clicks radiator, now out of business, recored the radiator. Redoing the body took me about a year. A club member re spoked the wheels for me. I bought a Model T coupe in 1957 and have been collecting parts since that time. I used many items from my inventory and bought quite a few new parts and some used parts. I got a lot of help from friends, in particular, Royce's dad.

I think this type adventure is what you are in for. If you are game for it, then have at it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Matthew Atchinson on Monday, June 06, 2016 - 02:54 pm:

Thanks guys. My grandfather and I talked the other day and he's decided he's just not ready to let his roadster go yet. I still enjoy it though: I do a lot of his maintenance and tuning for him since he's getting up there in years. I may look around for a driver car in the meantime. Definitely going to try and stay local.


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