Your Favorite Model-Year Model T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Your Favorite Model-Year Model T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 12:16 pm:

When Ford Motor Company enacted the T-100 program which produced six spanking-new Model T Fords in 2001, they had to do a little head-scratching to come up with which model-year would best represent the entire 18 1/2-year run of Flivvers—and we all know they decided on 1914. _Not a bad choice considering that was the year the moving assembly line made the most significant advances, the five-dollar day was established, Mr. Ford {reputedly} said, "... any color so long as it's black"—and the '14 was a pretty brass car with acetylene lamps and a wooden dash, in the neighborhood of the middle of the Model T run. _Not that anyone needs my approval, I thought it was a wise choice.

But if I had my 'druthers, my personal choice for my personal use would be a little different, though not so radical as to be impractical for bopping around the neighborhood and some solid touring. _And that begs a question that I don't believe has been asked, at least now during the time I've been a member of this forum.

So, this question is a poll: For your own personal use, what would be your favorite model-year of Model T and why?

And as long as we're at it, what's your favorite body style and why?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 12:42 pm:

Touring hands down. Like the 23/25's best. Had 2 23's and a '27 Tudor. The Tudor was a tight fit height wise and seemed kind of heavy compared to the Tourings. Least favorite? Probably the early Coupes with the turtle deck. Passed one up at a decent price a few years ago right in the neighborhood. Just couldn't swallow that deck. Looked like an after thought. Now the 26/27's are another story. Amazing what a little bent metal will do for looks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Watson -Florence,Colorado on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 01:04 pm:

1909 Coupe

-Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay Area) on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 01:21 pm:

Had hoped to find a '22 coupe with the suicide doors before I acquired 'Cranky'... Now I don't have any more room!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 01:28 pm:

1927 Touring.

Henry's Improved Car. Edsel's body and paint treatments for modern day look and style, and the Ole Man's limited 'improvements' to the chassis, gleaned from sales and service reports on troublesome nit-pick issues.

The best of the T in Henry's opinion, the final issue.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 02:11 pm:

For looks, the roadster, from about '15 to end. My favorite in that period is '25 (probably because I have one!)
For taking someone on a drive: the touring!
While I really like brass era, the black era is really nice and what most folks remember.
Improved Ford--a wanna-be Model A!
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 02:40 pm:

My favorite Model T is the TT running chassis, 1917-27. With only a few subtle changes over the years of production there's not much noticeable difference from beginning to end. The sheet metal (front fenders) were never changed (although the radiator and hood went to the "high" design).

Part of my appreciation of these trucks is the broad range of bodies that were applied to them. There was everything from some very fancy coach work to make something like a hearse to simple flat beds (no cab at all) made of common construction lumber.

They truly illustrate, for me anyway, the early 20th century transition from muscle power to the mechanized world we live in today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 02:52 pm:

1911 Touring and 1914 Touring! Got one and someday hope to have both!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 03:20 pm:

I have a 26 rpu. And a 27 roadster but would really like a really nice 27 sedan. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 03:20 pm:

I have pretty much always liked the 1911 torpedo most of all. Followed closely by the '11 open roadster with the gasoline tank on the rear deck. It is a proper factory offering with the good look of a speedster. For practical reasons, carrying friends and the like, I would prefer to have an '11 touring. I guess, when I think about it, I would have to say that 1911 would be my favorite year. 1915 is a fine year, iconic for the model T in general, still brass and the convenience of electric lights.
Except for the impractical aspects of not enough passenger room, I guess I am doing okay for myself putting together a spring '15 runabout. And, if I live long enough to restore it, the late '12 MIL roadster project pile I jumped on a few years ago is probably as close to an '11 as I will ever get.
I like all years and factory styles of model T Fords. I prefer the look of earlier coupes, but love my '24 coupe, and enjoy seeing pictures of all the coupes. I wish I had a sedan or a touring so I could carry friends better and more.
I wouldn't know what to say about my least favorite model T. I mostly like them all. I like trucks, and speedsters, open cars and enclosed. But I do tend to favor earlier over later all the way down the line.
Whatever your favorite model T?
Do drive carefully, and enjoy it! W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ryan Fenrich on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 03:26 pm:

I've always thought the early black roadsters captured the 'spunky' look of the era better than anything else. A 1917 roadster with a two man top, rear spare tire, un-tapered turtle deck, and black wooden wheels describes not only Model T's, but cars of that era as well. A close second is a red touring or tourabout from 1909-1911.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Manuel, Lafayette, La. on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 03:29 pm:

I like the ones that make a buzzing noise and run on mag.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 03:46 pm:

I love all Model T's, and of course the brass ones for sure. However, my favorite "TO OWN", for me, practicality and expense-wise and all considered, would be for sure a touring, and I like the idea of a '16, as it has a bit of brass, enough to be pretty but not so much to maintain, and with brass electric headlights.

I like the "new-improved" '26 - '27" touring, and the '26 the best because it has the simpler NH Holley carburetor instead of the '27's more complicated vaporizer carburetor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 03:52 pm:

As an "aside" in this thread, David Dewey hit on an interesting point:

As David said, what most people remember are the "black era" Model T's. Conjecture on my part, but I think that one big reason for this is that most of the Model T's used in the early "silent films" were "black era" T's,....think Laurel & Hardy and Charlie Chaplin!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 04:58 pm:

I like any pre 26 T. 4 me the 26 and 27 look too much like the A.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 05:30 pm:

If I were to have another T it would be ether a 1914 to 1922 touring or 1919 to 1923 coupe. My 1921 started life as a coupe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 05:30 pm:

Wouldn't mind an 11 torpedo or touring but they're scarce as hens teeth and too expensive. Next in line would be the '12 touring but it'd have to be dark blue. Roo many of em are red which is nice but...and I already have a red '12 roadster p/u anyway. But, I'm plenty happy with the 3 caballeros in my profile. The '20s fun too. I just love 'em all :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 05:40 pm:

I think my favorite what I would like to have is a roadster with a pick up bed. I could use one! every time I go for a ride I always pick up something. I cant pass a good garage sale or garbage pile!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 06:01 pm:

1909-10 roadster, 1911 open runabout


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 06:11 pm:

Harold,
I hadn't thought about that, but I think you're right! And I'm a bit of a fan of silent movies!
Oh, and my least favorite Model T?? MINE, when it breaks down!!
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 06:57 pm:

I like 1909 model year best. Wish I could afford a two lever two pedal runabout, a water pump three pedal touring, and an above 2500 serialized town car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Mc Willie on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 07:25 pm:

I like them all. There is something quite charming and attractive about each year and each individual body style. At times I prefer my 1910 touring-it's antique looking and there is room for passengers and touring supplies. I really like the carriage look of the body and top assembly. Sometimes, I like the privacy of my 1911 torpedo. My 1925 Rajo racecar is certainly lots of fun, sounds great, and will leave most early cars in the dust. I like touring in the 1913 touring as it has the added protection of front doors but still looks antique. I have a 1914 runabout that should be running soon. I like the minimal brass trim against the all black. My assembled 1912 pie wagon is fun to drive around town and makes a good little hauler, but a little too boxy for long distance touring. The general public seems to like that one the best. My father built one very similar to mine back in the 1950s, so I have a soft spot for it.

Lately, I have become infatuated with 26-27 roadsters and coupes. I think an "improved" coupe would make a real comfortable driving car but a wire-wheel roadster is certainly sporty looking car. There is also something special about an all black 1923-25 touring car. Although its one of the most common, I have never owned one and I am really attracted to them because I think they represent the essence Model T design. Fortunately, T-Polygamy is legal!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warwick Landy Traralgon Australia on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 07:31 pm:

My favourite is the 1915 Couplet. Comfort of a nice closed car on nasty days and lovely top down motoring on nice days. Also the additional protection of those tall doors and window glass. This is the car that is also most likely to ensure my wife will travel with me on all tours. I would like a range of the whole 1915/16 Model year. Town Car, Touring , Roadster Couplet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 08:12 pm:

I like my 11 open runabout.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 08:14 pm:

Without a doubt 1914 touring. It's probably the one style and year I can nearly afford. And they're the best looking when restored.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 08:41 pm:

To adapt a Will Rogers’ saying, “I never met a T, I didn’t like.”

Question: So, this question is a poll: For your own personal use, what would be your favorite model-year of Model T and why?
And as long as we're at it, what's your favorite body style and why?

Answer for me: 1915 cut off – but only the 1 named Blackie

Why?:

It is special to have a car that your Father, Grandfather, Mother, Grandmother, or other relative previously owned. And some of you are blessed to have one like that. My 1915 cut off – Blackie was my Dad’s first antique car he purchased after he returned from serving in WWII and married my Mom. Interestingly – Dad circled the block several times in his 1940’s modern car so he could look at Blackie. The T was parked on a street in down town Shreveport, Louisiana. My Mom said why don’t you park and ask him if it is for sale. Dad said, “No it isn’t for sale.” And Mom replied something along the lines of, “You will never know if you don’t ask.” So, Dad stopped to look and ask. It was for sale. But the owner wanted a $150 for it and Dad only had $50 left from his military pay (they paid in cash back then). So Mom suggested that Dad talk to his Father-in-law about a one or two week loan until he got paid again. And my Granddaddy loaned him the money to close the deal.



It is special to have the car you first learned to drive in. And Blackie was that car for me.



Initially it was more like I learned to drive straight down the drive way, slowly in first gear with Dad walking beside the car ready to push the gas lever up if I goofed up and forgot how to stop or got going too fast. And over time I was allowed to drive around the yard and finally on the back streets of our neighborhood. Back then people didn’t sue each other as often. And where I grew up many of the kids including me learned to drive a car, truck, tractor etc. long before we were old enough to get a license. And we were often seen on the road by our parents and the police and it was ok. I wouldn’t recommend that today – except on private property with permission.

It is special to have a car that brings back lots of good memories. And Blackie is that car for me. Like some kids who grew up with a faithful dog, I never remember a time in my life when Blackie wasn’t around or at least safe in Dad’s garage after I left home and joined the military. I have posted the story below back in 2006, but I’ll post it again as it is represents one of the special times that Blackie impacted my life.

When I was growing up all our old cars were pre-starters. I can remember as a little kid when I first became strong enough to turn the engine over if it had been previously running and was all warmed up. Dad would work the spark, gas, and ignition switch while I would slowly pull up on the crank. If the car had been driven recently, it would start right up even with my really slow pull. But if it hadn't been started for the day, it was a real challenge for me back then. I knew if I heard the pitch of the coil singing change, I had made it to the next cylinder, but that if it returned to the original pitch, I had only rocked the engine but not turned it over yet. And Dad would let me keep trying until it either started or I needed to give him a break because he was getting “tired out” from being ready to pull the spark down when it started. We would switch places and of course the car would vibrate to life with his normal pull on the crank.

He never yelled at me for forgetting to retard the throttle or when I killed the engine by accidentally stopping in the "off" position when I tried to switch from battery to mag. And then as I got a little older I gained the strength -- and maybe even the height that I needed to be able to start it even when it was the first start for the day. And years later, I remember when Dad could no longer start the car, how he now only worked the throttle, gas, and switch. And in the back ground you could hear the coils singing the slightly different notes as we turned the engine over to start. We would still sometimes forget to turn the gas on and who in their right mind would want to drive an open T when it was that cold at Christmas or in the summer when it was that hot outside? And he in his 80s and I in my 40s still shared some of the happiest times of our lives.

The forum can be therapeutic for some of us. It wasn’t until I started to make the original posting back in 2006 that my “clue light came on.” I realized for the first time and wrote: While reflecting back over all this I think I see some things that I believe God put into place to bring me to where I am today. I was probably five to seven years old when I was having trouble hand cranking that T. Compared to most of the kids my age, I was always the littlest boy in my class and sometimes there wasn't even a shorter girl in my class. What a bummer it would have been if Dad had expected me to always be better, quicker, or stronger than the other boys my age. Yet he was always so understanding and supportive to what I was trying to do. I knew he helped me develop a very positive self image. He always shared that I or for that matter anyone could accomplish just about anything if they were willing to work at it long enough and hard enough. But it wasn't until just now [Feb 2006] that I realized his "letting me try until I needed to spell him from the easier task" was one of those many ways he kept encouraging me to grow and learn. He knew I couldn't start that Model T when the engine was cold. But he didn't say, "No, your too little, or not strong enough, etc." Instead he allowed me to try and gave me a "win-win" opportunity. If it started, "I was a hero." If I didn't get it started I could help Dad by giving him a break from running the gas and spark levers. And we had the fun time of going for a drive either way. And he always helped me "win" because he would have me crank it up after the drive, while it was still warmed up, so he could put it back into the garage. What about me and what about you -- are we taking the time to help someone out there become a "hero?"

And where would I get such a Dad who was so understanding? Well, I believe God in His providence worked a series of events for good for both my Dad as well as for me. It was 1918 and many people in the rural areas of Arkansas kept the riffle or shotgun up above the door. The kids couldn't get to it and it was ready if you needed it to shoot a raccoon or varmint that might be bothering the chickens. Gun safes were still far in the future and they were well outside of the budget even if they had been available. Dad was about two years old and somehow the shotgun fell and discharged. Getting hit by a shotgun blast isn't good at any age but at two there is a lot less of you than if you are eighteen. Fortunately the pellets were the small squirrel shot (the last one finally worked its way out in 1990 or so) and they impacted his hip area rather than his chest or head. The doctors were able to stabilize him and he grew up in Arkansas. He was now destined to be the weakest boy his age, as they didn't really do physical therapy etc. back in rural Arkansas. As a teenager he worked hard but his hip would hurt long before the 12 hour shift at the saw mill was over. So he knew first hand what it was like to start with a slight disadvantage. Yet I believe it was that hardship that helped him to be so understanding and encouraging to me.

So what are the lessons in life that God has brought each of us through and are we using them to encourage others? Many of us have a great conversation starter -- our T. A simple, “Would you like to go for a ride?” Just might change someone’s life for the better. Tim McGraw’s country song, “Humble and Kind” captures a lot of my thoughts about Dad, Mom, family, kids, and Blackie. If you enjoy country music it is at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awzNHuGqoMc
And that and a 1000 other good memories are why a 1915 cut off named Blackie is my favorite year and model.

God Bless,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 08:50 pm:

This is like asking which kid you like best

Who really cares?

They are all great!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 09:23 pm:

What and why .....

While many T people are brand-loyal, diehard Ford nuts, I am not. I can count the Fords I like on
my fingers, mostly because they were cheap cars and reflect that, when compared to other makes
of any given period.

But the T is something more. It was a revolutionary machine and a revolutionary time. During its
span of production it saw automobiles go from silly little spindly horseless carts, to fairly refined and
stylishly sculpted cars that ushered in the modern era. What's key in this is something beyond the
cars themselves, but what happened to America through this period and perhaps the part the T played
in moving us along through that process. It was a time when cheap was not only perfectly fine, it was
very much in line with the common American paradigm and mores that would change before the last
T's were made.

I find the brass cars to be quaint, and by the time the Improved Cars came along, the aforementioned
intangible change had occurred, and to my eye, the Improved Car is not a Model T, but rather a separate
"transition" design to the Model A that does not capture the essence of America moving out of the horse
drawn age. As such, the black era, to me epitomizes that great revolution in America, and nothing captures
it more than the TT trucks that put the big teams of horses out to pasture for good. They were the
quintessential relic hiding in the barns around where I grew up, themselves put out to pasture when those
who kept them through the war finally decided to get something more modern. When the unwashed
masses think of a Model T or anything from that iconic age, the image is typically a black era car. And
for that, the black era is most iconic in the image of Americana.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, June 04, 2016 - 09:55 pm:

Wonderful piece Hap! I think I missed that back in 2006.
Also, Burger, Very well put!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 02:10 am:

Its not an accident that I own a '14 Touring. I will always own this '14 Touring. I chose this as my favorite about a decade ago, for many of the same reasons that Ford chose it for the T-100 project. Its the quintessential Model T. It's got that great little hood and a brass radiator. It seats five comfortably. I also like the fact that it's a true gas headlamp era car that's easy to find parts for. Most of all, I like it because my wife is so sentimentally attached to it that she won't ever let me sell it. She put her foot down on that idea a couple of years ago when I mentioned that maybe we should sell it in order to buy the '12 Touring from my father's estate. She simply said "No. We used that car in our wedding and our honeymoon. We're keeping it." I love the way she smiles at me when we're out for a drive in it on some rural back road with all our daily cares melting away beneath the rhythmic cadence of the coils.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Mikeska, Denver CO on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 02:44 am:

Anything 14!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 06:32 am:

I currently drive a '26 touring. It has its advantages, but driver comfort isn't one of them. Eventually I'd like to get a '14 or '15 Touring when time and finances permit. In the mean time, I am happy with what I have. It runs well, drives well, handles and rides well. Doesn't look as cool as any of the early cars though. Something needs to be said for the eye appeal of of brass cars. They are definitely in a class all their own.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim magill on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 07:42 am:

For Me it's a 1914 Touring, I second Eric that it is the quintessential Model T, but I agree with Burger that the black era is the most iconic


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 09:37 am:

To me, nothing captures the "Model T look" like the '17-'22 cars. I chose the '19 because it still represents the 1910s decade while being more practical to drive with starter/generator/battery and demountable rims. I also prefer the stylish looks of the Runabouts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 11:14 am:

1914. When I was looking for a T, it had to be a 1914 touring. To me, it is the stereotypical, quintessential T AND historically significant for reasons you already know. I mean, there is a reason FoMoCo chose the 1914 to reproduce.

Burger, nicely put. I never thought of those as "transitional" cars.

Hap, a terrific story. Really enjoyed it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 11:37 am:

I agree with what Burger said about the 26/27 cars. To me they are a step between the black era Model T and new Model A. A class all to them self and thought that they should have been know as Model S or something like that. (the S for style :-) )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 12:18 pm:

23-25 touring, I like the look the slant windshield
and prefer the typical black era cars. Of the brass I like my 14 over my 13 and earlier,I like the rounded doors and later look. I like the touring body over all others, also unique commercial trucks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 06:21 pm:

Hap,

What a wonderful story and great memories you must have. You need to get Blackie out and recreate that photo so you have a "then and now" picture. (I'm sure you'll have to use different laundry in the back ground. :-) )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 07:31 pm:

Please back the train up or run it by one more time! I fail to see how a 19 repersents 1910's decade?? No brass radiator no wood dash,no straight out the back rear fenders,no gas lite's No louvers in hood's?? Sorry,but i can't see it! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 08:55 pm:

Ummm.......last time I checked, 1919 was part of the 1910s decade as were three full years of black Model T production. Correct me if I'm wrong but, I thought the 1920s started in, well.......1920.

(Message edited by 404_not_found on June 05, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Perkins / Lakeland, Mn on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 09:41 pm:

I would guess my favorite is the 1914 Touring......over the past 30 years I have owned four different ones. As soon as I sold one I would have "seller's remorse" and search for another. This one I have now is the best and will not leave the stable under my watch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Sunday, June 05, 2016 - 10:08 pm:

I have a '24/'25 touring, but I'd rather have a brass touring anywhere between '11 and '15.


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