1911/1912 Blue paint code

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: 1911/1912 Blue paint code
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Mays on Monday, June 06, 2016 - 02:15 pm:

Here is a picture of the label showing the paint code for the dark blue used on Frank. Hope this comes out so you can read it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Gitts - Ferndale, WA on Monday, June 06, 2016 - 07:55 pm:

For those who would like to use this blue in base/clear, I have the following formula:

PPG -Deltron 2000 base/clear application:

Code # 12879 - Dunkelblau (midnight blue)-[prime]

Mixing formula (units to make one quart)

Base toner Color Part Cumulative
---------- ------ ------ -----------
DMD646 weak white 58.8 58.8
DMD1675 Blue 427.6 486.4
DMD1683 Black 180.4 666.8
DMD614 Blue 47.4 714.2
DBX1689 Clear conv. 282.8 1007.0

Okay- writing this up, I had the columns separated out for ease of reading, but preview and posting eliminated the spacing. The first parts measurement is the actual amount of toner, the second number is the cumulative number. You'll have to put your own space in there. The final amount is 1007.0 units, which is one quart. I'm glad to e-mail the actual formula to who ever needs it. Just PM me.

If using Detron base/clear, I recommend Deltron 4000 clear. High solids, easy sand/buff and great UV protection.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, June 06, 2016 - 08:25 pm:

Les,
Was easy enough in Word to convert to a table (copied your posting to Word, tabbed between each bit of your chart, then "convert text to table at tabs & voila! Very readable.
What if we don't want to do a base/clear job, but just solid color? (I know, OLD school) That last item, of which there's quite a bit, is "clear conv."???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Trent Boggess on Monday, June 06, 2016 - 10:03 pm:

I used this blue on my 1911 torpedo. It is a very nice blue, but it is important to use a dark primer, preferably a black. Let me explain.

I used grey Fill and Sand as my primer base, and shot the blue over that. Indoors, it looks great, and appears to be all but black under fluorescent lights. But, when you look at the car outside in bright sunlight, it looks like a very light blue. Same paint, different lighting conditions.

The working hypothesis is that outdoors in bright sunlight, the sun's rays pass through the blue and are reflected off the grey primer, making the blue appear much lighter in color. It has been suggested that if a dark colored primer were used, or if a first coat of black was applied under coats of the blue, the reflection off the grey primer would not occur, and the color will appear as much darker blue in the daylight.

If I had it to do all over again, I would make sure that I used either a dark primer, or a first coat of black under the blue top coats.

Whatever you do, experiment a bit before committing yourself to the final finish.

Respectfully submitted,

Trent Boggess


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, June 06, 2016 - 11:06 pm:

Hmm, as I pointed out there is a LOT of "Clear Conv." so maybe there isn't a lot of dense opaque solids in the paint?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Tuesday, June 07, 2016 - 01:29 am:

Dark Blue colors are known to have poor opacity,
They always require black as a ground coat as do maroon colors or red oxide color primer also works OK.

If you don't then you will get what Trent has described. Use either a black primer or use the same type of paint as the blue in black first.

Same will apply if you use a solid blue as mentioned by David Dewey.

If you apply more coats to bury the see through look you will probably apply too much and the paint finish may fail.

The idea today is the base color has pigments which cover better and in doing so have poor gloss so the gloss is applied over the color.

The original paint applied by Ford was completely different but also had a base blue followed by a clear.

Surprising that the paint seller did not mention this fact to the buyer at the time of purchase. Though as is usually the case these days such people have little or no background knowledge of what they sell.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter B. Ratledge on Tuesday, June 07, 2016 - 11:18 am:

I agree with Trent and Peter. When I had my 1911 painted 25 years ago we did not put a dark primer on. The paint is a real dark blue. When the sun shines at a certain angle, it has a purplish look to it. the paint is SIKKENS AUTOCRYL ENAMEL.
The paint has lasted very well.


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