T Inspection Day

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: T Inspection Day
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 12:20 am:

One of my favorite times of the year is when i bring my T in for inspection, and pay the State my $35.00 for being such good stewards of our collective money that they spend so wisely. :-) Although i go to the same place every year, there is always someone new there that has no clue how to deal with a Model T. Today i handed the reg to the guy at the counter and he basically left it up to me as to how to proceed. When i drove it in shop, i could see that the 20+ year old guy was slightly frazzled, as he had never inspected a car this old. I told him all the things that were grandfathered in, and all the things that were required to pass inspection. Today was the first time that someone actually thanked me while inspecting my car, and this was the first time i actually enjoyed them doing it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 12:34 am:

No inspections required here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 12:38 am:

Steve, under a certain year i assume?..Whats the cut-off?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 06:21 am:

No inspections in PA either if you're putting on an antique plate. That would only be required if you're putting on a regular plate and intend to drive it everyday.

I bet that young guy had a blast.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 07:58 am:

John, my car is finally going back together. What in our lovely state is required, want to make sure I don't end up with issues. I do plan on antique plates. My car will be a speedster without windshield, top, or doors.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth in Alabama on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 08:10 am:

No inspection here at all. They wanted to see the "vin" number one time during initial registration.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 08:10 am:

No, John. No inspections. Period. Our governor and legislature are too busy wrecking the state's finances to bother with anything else.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 08:16 am:

No inspections in MO for cars with antique or year of manufacture (YOM) plates. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 08:24 am:

I love when they say they will remove a wheel to inspect the brakes. Then they ask me to turn on the tail and side lights. There is also a check list for two door, four door or van. My T has no doors. Finally they simply inspect the tire treads and hand me the sticker ... but there is no windshield. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 08:49 am:

My experience with my 30 Town Sedan has always been the same as John's - guy stares, asks me questions about how things work, looks at hi/low beam, brake lights, listens to the horn and then puts the sticker on while giggling.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jerry knouse on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 08:52 am:

David, go to a local vintage car show and you will notice many of the older, Mass. registered cars, will not have stickers. This would include mine. I was told by a Mass. State Trooper that a policeman would have to be a total p---k to ticket my car for no sticker.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 09:49 am:

John you didn't mention if you car has Antique or regular plates. That would make a difference if you have to have your T inspected.
Could be the guy at the inspection station doesn't know the differences using antique plates or regular plates.
There was a guy here locally that was inspecting trailers having a load limit under 4000 lbs. not knowing trailers don't have to be if they met that load limit.
Evidently the owners didn't know the differences either.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 09:57 am:

Except for smog/exhaust system check on car/trucks 1975 and newer, no inspection in Oregon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 09:57 am:

Illinois doesn't have inspections either. I'm surprised that we don't, given our financial crisis and all. But for now we're safe. We have restrictions on antique plates, but most of my driving is on back roads so what they don't know won't hurt them. I've yet to find a law in Illinois regarding year of manufacture plates, so I run them on my car and keep the antique tags it's registered with under the seat with the registration and insurance. Call me a rebel.

I would like to drive around town someday and get pulled over by some know-nothing young cop. I think it would be a hoot. I'm guessing it would go something like this:

COP: Sir, do you know how fast you were going?
ME: Nope. No speedometer.
COP: I see you're not wearing a seat belt.
ME: Don't have one of those either.
COP: Did you know you only have one tail light?
ME: That's all I started with. Glad it's still back there.
COP: I need to see your license and registration.
ME: Ok, sure. (Slides out of passenger door)
COP: Sir what are you doing?
ME: (Lifts seat cushion) Getting the registration.
COP: Don't you have a glove box for that?
ME: Glove box? What do you think this is, a Packard?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 10:09 am:

Surprisingly, except at initial registration, there is no inspection required here in sunny Califunny either. I guess I would be well advised to be careful what I bring up for discussion.........


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason Given - St. Paul, MN on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 10:13 am:

You would think they would put on an exception for vehicles older than X years.

We had vehicle inspections for a couple years. The program died quickly, it was only around I would guess two or three years. Now there are no inspections at all. Sometimes I do wish we still had them as there are some true wrecks on the road.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnCodman on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 10:27 am:

I have found that what Jerry Knouse said is true. My T has a 1993 sticker on it. I'm not spending $35 for a new sticker when the so-called inspector can't even drive my T into the inspection bay.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ronald Bolser - Danville, IL on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 10:28 am:

Jared,
Illinois does have a law allowing year of manufacture plates to be displayed as long as you carry your registered Antique vehicle plates in the vehicle with you.
I have antique military vehicles and 2 T's.
Only was stopped once after being followed for two miles in my M38 jeep. He was a car guy and only wanted to see it.
The State police here just wave at me or give a thumbs-up.
Might be a different case though if they spotted it at your work place 5 days a week though - using it as a daily driver.
I had a State cop also suggest I have an orange triangle displayed on them (which I do) even though the law says for farm vehicles only.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 11:29 am:

No inspection in Florida for any year plus the Horseless Carriage registration is a one time fee for life. All my cars are registered in Florida for that reason.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 01:05 pm:

In ca. You can get a ticket for things like bald tires, loud exhaust, cracked windshield, bulbs burned out, lenses broken, etc.
I just wish. They'd start shooting people with head lights out of adjustment.
I have never heard of anyone being stopped for that in Ca.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron in Central Massachusetts on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 01:54 pm:

MSP are not the issue - neither are big city cops like Boston it Worcester. It's the small town ones who'll cite you. Ironically. Traffic "violations" are their bread and butter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 05:06 pm:

Ronald, I've never seen anything like that and I spent hours searching the Secretary of State's office website. Since I'm registered with antique plates the only reason I was looking was so I could print a copy of the law and keep it in the car. Since I couldn't find anything about it, I figured I'd just let it ride until the cops got involved.

I'm still surprised we don't have any inspections. Sounds like places with inspections let T's slide due to incompetence of the inspectors.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 05:35 pm:

Jared, I once had a conversation with a local cop that was a little like your hypothetical one. I was pulled over when I was driving my '41 Dodge. The misunderstanding was actually telegraphed in our first exchange:

Cop: "Your brake lights aren't working."
Me: "It isn't?"

(In fact, I knew that it was working because I saw the ammeter move whenever I stepped on the brake.)

The key is the use of plural/singular. This was a young cop who was unaware that Chrysler products in the 1940s had a single brake light in the center of the trunk rather than one on each fender. He was actually pleased to have learned something that day.... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 08:06 pm:

NH has no inspection or safety requirements for older vehicles.
I carry a copy of the law in my T so I can educate an officer that might stop me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Seth in Alabama on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 10:17 pm:

Jared, I would HIGHLY recommend explaining to the police officer that you need to exit the vehicle FIRST before doing so. Just moving like that, despite the antique car, is likely to get you tasered, shot, or at the very least set the officer on edge.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 10:56 pm:

A Model T would not pass inspection standards in PA so it must be registered as an antique vehicle by default. There is no other option for a stock T in Pennsylvania. An antique vehicle in PA must be used exclusively between sunrise and sunset and may not be used as a daily driver.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 11:13 pm:

In MA., we have 3 options..You can use antique plates, YOM plates, or regular plates. The antique and YOM plates have restrictions about when and why you should be driving your T. I opted for the uglier, but less restrictive plates. Whether the police understand all the nuanced B.S. that is involved with special plates is up for debate, but i opted for the ugly and hassle free T driving.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 11:35 pm:

Washington State stopped doing vehicle inspections when it was discovered there were no state employees smart enough to conduct them.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Saturday, June 11, 2016 - 11:35 pm:

@ David Mazza, if i were you i would bring in some pics of your car to the shop that you plan on getting a sticker from and see what they suggest. Being a speedster i would think that they would be even more confused as what to look for than they did with my 25. Best of luck, looks likes a great car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Sunday, June 12, 2016 - 01:09 am:

I don't ask the state any special favors for my Model T, so no historical registration or plates, which means there are no restrictions as to when and where I can drive the car. _She gets her annual New York State inspection (not that there's much to inspect) and Hagerty writes the insurance policy. _I keep, in the storage compartment, a copy of the law that exempts my car from seat-belts, windshield wipers, etc., in case I run into a constable who is unfamiliar with the regs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Sunday, June 12, 2016 - 06:53 am:

Bob, where did you find a copy of the laws that you keep in the car?

I am sure they are buried on a website somewhere.
Here in NY for anything 25 and older gets a safety only inspection which is $10 annually, no matter how it's registered. Cars 2 years old but less than 25 years old get a safety/emissions sticker that is $21 annually.

As far as here, we have independent garages that do inspections and NY trained licensed inspectors (employees of the repair facility). So while an inspector can look beyond basic items, it is really the determination of the person doing it whether it passes or not.

As with most here, you bring in something this old and they are clueless. But as an inspector myself, I would require headlights, operating hand brake, a single tail light on the left side (does not have to be a brakelight), and check the steering linkage for excessive slop. That is about all that is required on a model T here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jerry knouse on Sunday, June 12, 2016 - 08:25 am:

Chad, would you actually require me to activate my acetylene generator and light my lights ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Sunday, June 12, 2016 - 09:21 am:

Chad,

You can find the NYS seat-belt exemption clause to the law on this page (fifth bulleted item down):

http://ypdcrime.com/vt/vtl-seat-belt-guide.htm

It might be a good idea to print it and keep it within quick reach in your Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Mazza on Sunday, June 12, 2016 - 09:40 am:

John n, I read the restrictions for antique plates. Saturday and Sunday no problem. During the week must be preparing for club event(tuning ) transport to or from repair facility. Cruise nights. My plan if pulled over on a beautiful sunny day on a sick day from work is to lie to the cop, heck already lied to work about being sick!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Sunday, June 12, 2016 - 10:29 am:

Our plates are roughly the same way. Antique plates are only allowed driving to and from events or repair shops. We also have Antique Expanded Use plates, where there are no driving restrictions from April to October. If I drove my car more than I do now, I might opt for the Expanded Use plates, but for now regular Antique plates are cheaper and still fit the way I use the car.

It's fascinating to read threads like this and to see how different the laws are from state to state.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, June 12, 2016 - 11:13 am:

I have posted this here before. Missouri had the same limitations for antique plates (only club events, shows, etc.) until the late Bud Barnes, state legislator and member of several car clubs (including the St. Louis MTFCA chapter) rewrote it to include 1000 "personal miles" a year. Then a few years later, John Loudon, state legislator and son of a fanatic Nash guy, added the YOM plate provision.

Sections 301.131.4-5 RSMo now read as follows:

"4. Historic vehicles may be driven to and from repair facilities one hundred miles from the vehicle's location, and in addition may be driven up to one thousand miles per year for personal use. The owner of the historic vehicle shall be responsible for keeping a log of the miles driven for personal use each calendar year. Such log must be kept in the historic vehicle when the vehicle is driven on any state road. The historic vehicle's mileage driven in an antique auto tour or event and mileage driven to and from such a tour or event shall not be considered mileage driven for the purpose of the mileage limitations in this section. Violation of this section shall be punishable under section 301.440 and in addition to any other penalties prescribed by law, upon plea or finding of guilt thereof, the director of revenue shall revoke the historic motor vehicle license plates of such violator which were issued pursuant to this section.

5. Notwithstanding any provisions of this section to the contrary, any person possessing a license plate issued by the state of Missouri that is over twenty-five years old, in which the year of the issuance of such plate is consistent with the year of the manufacture of the vehicle, the owner of the vehicle may register such plate as an historic vehicle plate as set forth in subsections 1 and 2 of this section, provided that the configuration of letters, numbers or combination of letters and numbers of such plate are not identical to the configuration of letters, numbers or combination of letters and numbers of any plates already issued to an owner by the director. Such license plate shall not be required to possess the characteristic features of reflective material and common color scheme and design as prescribed in section 301.130. The owner of the historic vehicle registered pursuant to this subsection shall keep the certificate of registration in the vehicle at all times. The certificate of registration shall be prima facie evidence that the vehicle has been properly registered with the director and that all fees have been paid."

When seven St. Louis Ts drove 1290 miles to Dearborn and back for the Ford Centennial, I interpreted the distance driven as falling under the provision reading, "The historic vehicle's mileage driven in an antique auto tour or event and mileage driven to and from such a tour or event shall not be considered mileage driven for the purpose of the mileage limitations in this section." :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, June 12, 2016 - 01:50 pm:

I collect and restore old light fixtures. I employ six early street light type fixtures on poles or
the exterior of my shop to put them back into service. The soft, old school glow of the light is
wonderful and adds to the ambiance I try to create around here.

I have a nosy, troublemaking neighbor around here somewhere that likes wasting time calling
any agency they can think of to get their inspectors out to make sure all my stuff is "up to code".

I have been visited over 40 times in the past 10 years by City Engineering, Electrical, Parking,
and Mechanical departments, as well as the Regional Air Pollution Control Authority and a few
others that escape me at the moment.

The latter was back this winter to photograph the smoke coming from my stack. I called the
agency and asked the dispatcher to invite the field guy outside to come in and look at my set up,
inspect my wood pile, whatever he might wish. I requested they make a note on the file for this
property that the owner offered such a tour and is perfectly happy to allow such, AND include my
phone number for future inquiries.

The visits always go the same ... a blustery official shows up talking about violations and fines
and then we have the "come to Jesus" talk, where I show them the math on electrical loads, insulation,
and how the street lights up and down my street are vastly inferior in "safety" than how my system
is built. They get the tour of the old cars, "Frankenstein" hardware, and other old junk in the shop,
and they go away happy, having made a neat discovery of old and cool that they never expected.

One guy wanted to nail me for cutting the crumbling curb down to an even surface, all bent up
about permits and codes and ordinances. I asked him about the USMC stickers on his truck and
he forgot all about the curb. The next hour was spent talking about his time in Vietnam. He drops
by from time to time just to talk about our time with the Corps.

It seems to me that there is an element in the human hard drive that NEEDS to be part of a
meaningful "cause". That takes an infinite number of forms, often rather misguided causes that
turn a well meaning person into nothing more than a PITA and pariah. Some can be guided back
to relative sanity. Others are hopelessly lost to the school of buttheads.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Sunday, June 12, 2016 - 02:04 pm:

A little drift, but along the same idea as some have expressed:

About 30 years ago I was Director of Facilities in our local elementary school district. Due to enrollment increases we added an additional school bus, which served 2 schools. A few days after we put it in motion the principal of one of the schools called to say, "Since we added the new route we need an additional 40' of curb on the side of the school painted red. Who do I intact at the city to make a request?"

Later that day the principal of the other school called me. He said, "Since we added another bus we needed another 40' of red curb. I had the custodian paint it this morning. Any problem with that?"

I'll let you guess, now all these years later, which school has the needed red curb and which is still waiting. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, June 13, 2016 - 06:19 am:

We are blessed here in South Australia. Our Historic Vehicles registration scheme allows us 90 days of unrestricted use each year. All we have to do is make a log book entry for the date of travel, and we are registered for road use. This log book is available for 1/4 of the usual registration fee for a 4 cylinder car, regardless of how many cylinders the car has. Use is unrestricted, even interstate.

The relevant old car club to which you must belong to access the scheme, is responsible for maintaining a register of log books and conducting a cursory inspection every 3 years to make sure you haven't turned your car into a hot rod.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Danek_ Salem, Mass on Friday, June 17, 2016 - 08:08 pm:

John Noonan, took my runabout to a local inspection station instead of trailering it a few towns over. The inspector said Mass state law says he has to drive into the bay. That is a new one on me. He asked how to drive it and after some explanation he asked about pressing the left pedal I told him he would go through the back wall and stop the next town over! Needless to say I asked him to ask his boss if I could drive it in. Sure enough I was able to bring it in the bay. No problem passing, but was not happy running in a closed area as it was getting hot. Did you also get challenged about you driving your own car into the inspection bay?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Friday, June 17, 2016 - 09:03 pm:

George, the first time i brought it in i didn't know what to expect from the shop. When the kid came out to drive it in i asked him if he knew how to drive a Model T. He looked at me like i had three heads and said "of course he did, his friend has a T-Bucket that he drives all the time". :-) When he looked inside the car he just shook his head and said, "you better bring it in" Now every-time i go there, i just hand the guy the Reg and tell him its a Model T so I'll drive it in, he just nods and says O.K.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Friday, June 17, 2016 - 09:13 pm:

George, why did you have to keep it running inside the shop?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Danek_ Salem, Mass on Friday, June 17, 2016 - 10:03 pm:

Kept it running for lights and for the mag horn. After that I did shut it down, hoping enough time passed so it would restart.


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