Added a Model T to the family - 1923 Touring

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Added a Model T to the family - 1923 Touring
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason midyette on Saturday, June 18, 2016 - 05:01 pm:

I have been thinking for a while now that it would be fun to do some sort of project over the summer with my daughters who are 15 and 12. My basic criteria was something that we could all work on, would be fun for all involved and we could all get use out of and enjoy when it was done along with perhaps imparting some of my fascination for old junk and bringing dead mechanical objects back to life as well as hopefully giving them some good memories. An old car of some sort seemed like it had good potential as we could all drive around in it when it was done. A simple and relatively cheap old car would be even better. A Ford Model T seemed to fit the bill perfectly, they are fairly common, so parts are still available, and are simple and reliable. The fact that they are an iconic piece of American history and that I have wanted one since I was 6 also played a role in the decision. Talked it over with the girls and they thought it sounded like fun, so we started looking around for a Model T touring car.

Found a fellow scrap metal enthusiast (Model T Haven) in Iola Kansas, about 150 miles south of us, so close enough to warrant a trip to look at the cars. Spent the last couple of months looking at the cars on the Model T Haven website, craigslist etc., looking at Model T parts catalogs and perusing the various Model T forums on the internet and trying to figure out what the heck I was getting myself into. Had some time on Friday June 3, so we went down to Iola to look at the cars in person to get a better idea of how doable a project this might be.

Had a nice time with Mark at Model T Haven, he took the time to show us all of his cars and answer my questions as well as give me an idea of how much of a project each car would be. One of the cars he had fit the bill pretty well, a 1923 Model T touring car, which was mostly complete, wood was all there and it had run in my lifetime. The car is a project but a doable one. Had no real thought of buying anything right then, but it was what we were looking for, so we went for it. Not having brought a trailer (or having any covered location to put the car), Mark said we could leave the car there for a while until we came up with a place to put it.

It only seems appropriate that something almost a century old should have a name, my oldest daughter said the car looked like a "George" while her younger sister pointed out that the car was obviously already named "Grand Prize" (note the fancy paint job on the rear passenger door) so we settled on "Grand Prize George", who we present below for your viewing pleasure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, June 18, 2016 - 05:21 pm:

Jason

You did a good deed dad for your daughters!

Same with me back in 1977, drug this '24 touring home from a barn, and the girls helped in making it a road worthy T.


and they still like riding and driving today :-)

Check you motor number, as the body seems like a '24, with high cowl, high hood, high radiator and radiator apron. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, June 18, 2016 - 05:23 pm:

That should keep you and the young ladies busy. As you say, the Model T is simple, but it does contain some $urpri$e$ that can co$t you. Forewarned is forearmed. Here's your ammo: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, June 18, 2016 - 05:29 pm:

As Dan posted above, your car is at least a 1924 Ford, even it if was actually assembled in 1923.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason midyette on Saturday, June 18, 2016 - 05:31 pm:

We decided not to let the fact that we still had n where to put it stand in the way of playing with the new toy, so last Saturday (June 11) we went down to Iola Kansas and picked up Grand Prize George the model T.

Got the car loaded up and went to breakfast at a restaurant in Iola. Found out that having a model T on the trailer was a good conversation starter, met two older couples out for breakfast who shared their memories of model T's from their youth; "they were just cheap cars then, we had lots of fun with them". Made it home with no problems, no ancient car parts exited stage right. Wonder how many times in the last 93 years the old Ford has been brought home by new owners.

As his new home is still under construction (a small garage built from the structure of an old Union Pacific boxcar that I salvaged 6 years ago, with some wood salvaged from a collapsed barn on my wife's family farm property thrown in in for good measure), George has been hidden away in the restored barn on said farm for the next week or so until we get the "garage" done, or at least done enough. My daughters are helping with the construction project, but the nuclear hot weather as of late has put a damper on progress.

Loading up the car in Iola


Loaded up and ready to go


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason midyette on Saturday, June 18, 2016 - 05:35 pm:

a couple more photos of the trip home;

on the road in Ottawa, Kansas


Home (Bendena, Kansas), with the new "garage" taking shape behind the car.


Dan, I like the photos of your project! Glad to know I'm not the only one with this crazy idea.

Motor # is 8372265


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Saturday, June 18, 2016 - 08:22 pm:

Jason

You have a '1924 model year' Ford.

8,372,265 engine built first shift, Sept. 13, 1923. 6,921 motors built that day.

Ford's new model year began Aug 1, 1923 for the new 1924 style cars, same as today, the 'new' cars come out in the fall of the preceding year. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Sunday, June 19, 2016 - 12:22 am:

I didn't know they had 21" wheels that early in '24, )(23)? My guess it would be a little later in '24, but I have no engine number to go by. I'd say at least 6-8 months after 1923. Check the patent tag on the firewall. It may even be a '25! Don't forget, engines have always been swapped. If the patent plate has clipped corners, it is a '25. All wood pillars up front would definitely be a '24.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Skille on Sunday, June 19, 2016 - 12:58 am:

The way I see the door hinges it would be a 25 body.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Sunday, June 19, 2016 - 04:29 am:

E brake quadrant would also have 2 rivets in '25 as opposed to 4 rivets in '24 too, I think. It's definitely not a '23. Not trying to pick it apart, just want you to know what you have. There are a LOT of differences between a '23 and a'24. Nice project! Keep us posted on your progress. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason midyette on Sunday, June 19, 2016 - 02:02 pm:

Got the garage mostly done last night, so we decided to move George into his custom built home...

First a little interior decorating


Definetly not a lot of extra room, but he fits. (garage is 13'4 long and just over 8' wide inside)


Now we just have to finish the door and some trim details, then we can start on the fun part, actually working on the car!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jason midyette on Sunday, June 19, 2016 - 02:10 pm:

Thank you all for your thoughts on George's actual vintage, it is always interesting to learn more about the various details of Model T production.

With the exception of the 21" demountable wheels, the car appears to be quite original. It has been painted once over the factory paint, but otherwise looks like is has never really been taken apart.

For what it is worth, the patent tag on the firewall has square corners, as seen below.

To me everything points to George being a September 1923 produced 1924 model year car, that has been titled based on its year of manufacture.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Laughary on Monday, June 20, 2016 - 09:25 am:

Nice!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, June 20, 2016 - 09:40 am:

Your car definitely appears to be a '24, especially since it has the wood pillars up front. What is interesting on your car, and others is the small hole just under the coilbox on the firewall. I've wondered why some firewalls have this hole, and some don't for years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, June 20, 2016 - 10:19 am:

Interesting - Larry, are you talking about the hole (or holes) circled in red, or the tiny one circled in green?

I just looked at my 1924 cut-off touring (engine number in January 1924) and it doesn't have either of those holes or any small holes under the coil box.

pic


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