OT, what kind of car?

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: OT, what kind of car?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Dowell on Wednesday, June 22, 2016 - 08:44 pm:

These followed me home, what are they. Both Frames are the same. Possible Hubmobile? CarCarFrame


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Wednesday, June 22, 2016 - 08:49 pm:

Not Hupmobile.

I'm not aware of any Hupmobiles that had cowl vents. (My dad owned a 1927 Hupmobile sedan for many years.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Wednesday, June 22, 2016 - 08:59 pm:

The way the frame goes over the rear axle looks similar to whatever this is:

Different cowl though, so who knows?

Want it? It's right next to a doodlebug I kind of want.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eckensviller - Thunder Bay, ON on Wednesday, June 22, 2016 - 09:00 pm:

...and I know that most old cars have the frame kick up over the rear axle like that, I just meant the angles and proportions of that section are very similar.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, June 22, 2016 - 10:17 pm:

Well, if this were an eBay auction, it would be listed as "Model T" ! :-)
That razor-sharp cowl edge might be a clue.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Evan Davis, Prince Albert, SK on Wednesday, June 22, 2016 - 10:26 pm:

23-24 auburn?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Dowell on Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 07:47 am:

Searching net possibly a Whippet? VIN tag similar 98 19###.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 07:56 am:

The drum headlight looks like a Buick as well as the gas tank provisions in the rear the cover over the front of the frame hiding the springs also would be common on the Buick's I am not real sure of the year but I think 20 - 24


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 08:00 am:

OOps I was looking at the wrong pic. but the frame and cab in the top pic do look like gm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 08:50 am:

Use to see the remains of old cars like these and others (whatever they are for sure?) years ago when I first got interested in Model T's.

Wish more of the other types of old cars that survived were restored but when you didn't know what they were they passed over and left in the field.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 10:12 am:

Waiting for someone else to make the effort is a great way to see that some things
never happen. That is what sets the Duty and Honor bound apart from all the rest.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 10:20 am:

Brian,

I'm thinking maybe Buick, 1926 - 1927. Can you show the fenders? Is there an aluminum tag riveted to the side of a frame rail, towards the front?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marvin C. Miller on Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 12:44 pm:

Seems to me when I was a kid (just a few years ago) that we saw a frame like that and picked it up. It was Baby Overland. A friend in high school tried to find enough parts to restore it. Don't think that happened.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Mettling - Dayton OH on Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 02:04 pm:

I think it's a Jewett. Those fenders and headlight assemblies are pretty close...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 03:42 pm:

The problem is, that type and style of frame, also the cowl, fenders, etc, were so common back in those days. With only minor differences, these parts will look a LOT like many cars. My very first reaction when I first looked at the pictures was Paige (the sister car to the Jewett). The frame is almost identical (in appearance) to the frame on my '27 Paige (which is nearly identical to a '26 Jewett). While the gasoline tank cover piece is almost a perfect match (in appearance), there were a couple minor cross member differences. So, maybe not Paige. Also, the firewall and cowl do not match my Paige, or Brian M's picture of a Jewett. There is one possibility with that. One model of Paige in '27 had sharper corners around the cowl, the '27 6-65. But I don't have one of those to look at. The cowl vent, body moldings, and other details are very close to my Paige.
The sharper corners on the cowl were common on many other cars, most notably Buick and Pierce Arrow. However, frame details make either of those unlikely. The Buicks that had a cowl similar to that were from '25 through '28. However, those year Buicks mostly had cantilever rear springs (as opposed to half elliptic like in Brian D's pictures). Frame does not look massive enough for Pierce Arrow.
Willys Knight between '24 and '28 would be a possibility, but again, I don't have enough detailed information to confirm or deny. They did have that combination of suspension, style, cowl vent, and sharpness of cowl corners. I do not know about their gasoline tank cover. But that general design was used on almost everything except Ford for several years.

It would be wonderful if that could actually get restored as a proper complete car. Unfortunately, the likelihood of that is very small because of so many cars built in small numbers and the small chance of finding enough needed correct parts.

Good luck anyhow! It would be nice if it can be saved. Or even identified for certain.
A lot of specific and very accurate measurements would help with identification a lot more than general style. A Whippet, for example, LOOKS a lot like a Paige or Buick in similar years, but it is smaller in nearly every dimension than almost anything else.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 04:31 pm:

Unfortunately folks that have good intentions and feel like they are duty bound to save some remains of old vehicles don't have the money to drive all over the country or spend a lot of money to restore a car that may take years to find any remains of another one like it or any vendors selling parts for them if at all.
Fortunately Model T's were made in the millions and parts are reproduced to keep the interest going. That's why this site is probably the most popular in the old car hobby . Especially for folks that don't have gold lined pockets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 09:19 pm:

John, that's definitely why I have Model T's. I wanted to be part of the hobby at some point and knew I wouldn't be able to afford the time or the money for very much. But the Model T's fit well in my budget and match my limited ability to learn. Yet I still feel I'm part of a pretty great hobby. I have found friends close by with Buicks and Maxwells and I admit I drool a little when I see them but I'm still smart enough to know I wouldn't do a restoration justice. Besides Model T's are the backbone of the automotive world. We all know that!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 10:43 pm:

Well, I can see your point. If I had my druthers, I'd own a period cut-down sedan-turned-truck,
made from a high end car ... Packard, Cadillac, etc. 40 years ago, everyone stood around lamenting
the damage done to these cars. But with values soaring for more exotic cars, many have found
nutters willing to rebody them and as a result, vehicles like that are hard to find and no longer cheap.
But a TT is cheap and like you said, easy to get parts for. But more than anything (for me), the TT is
such an iconic part of Americana that it makes an easy second choice.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration