Rebuilt motor, what oil?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Rebuilt motor, what oil?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By thomas elliott nw pa on Saturday, June 25, 2016 - 09:31 pm:

My '25 motor was rebuilt, I have no idea what that may or may not include. It had supposedly been running but I have not tried yet. It had sat for some months when I got it, so I drained the oil. Here is the question, the oil? that came out was a light gray very slippery no apparent water in it. Any idea what had been put in the motor? It now has 30 wt and has only been turned over a few times the last few months, I'm going to pull the cover off and have a look before I try to get it running so what should I look for? I repeat, it did not have water mixed with oil that I drained out. I have seen what that mess looks and feels like!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Rogahn - Davisburg, MI on Saturday, June 25, 2016 - 09:47 pm:

I use Brad Penn Penn-Grade 1 break in oil. It contains all of the good stuff that old engines like, such as zddp. You can order it just about anywhere including Amazon and eBay. Shute, I think you can get it at Walmart.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, June 25, 2016 - 10:08 pm:

Thomas, engine re-builders use different products as pre-lubes on various components. The idea is to give instant lubrication to parts on initial startup. Camshafts are prime candidates. Many of these compounds are moly based and will be grey in colour. This will certainly colour the oil.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Saturday, June 25, 2016 - 11:11 pm:

I was told the 15w40 shell was best for new engines with a bottle of zinc additive. This from a man who does nothing but restore model A s and T s. I did as recommended for the first 1000 miles and now I run super tech walmart 5w30 in my A models and my T s. Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 07:20 am:

My professionally rebuilt engine also sat for several months without having any oil in it other than the pre-lube used when assembling the engine. I just used Pennzoil 10W-40 and a small container of ZDDP (not ZDDP substitute that is available at auto parts stores). I fired up the engine after installing and drove it maybe for 50 miles before the engine fully broke it. You can tell by the temp on the motometer, it will drop once the engine has broken in and friction is reduced. Then at 200 miles I changed to the regular oil that I use. No problems at all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 08:48 am:

People have different ideas on this question and will continue to do so.
I put a light coat of STP on all bearing surfaces when building up an engine and use 10w-30 to start with. After running and driving the car for a while I drain it and go back with 10w-30. As far as the type or brand I use whatever is on sale or the house brand oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 09:01 am:

Thomas,

Ford originally supplied your Model T engine with oil that is equivalent to today's SAE20W. Any oil that you buy today is better than the oil that came in your car. You should be careful to not use oil that is too thick. Splash / drip oiling systems like that in your T are not capable of moving oil that is thick when cold.

I use 5W-30, whatever is on sale at the lowest price. I typically get oil at Pep Boys, this week it was Valvoline in the 5 quart jug that was cheapest. Your T uses a gallon of oil when dry. An engine that has been filled and drained is likely to need about 3 1/2 quarts to refill if you drained it on level ground.

Be careful not to over fill the engine. You should add oil only until oil begins to dribble out of the top petcock. Any higher and you will have smoky exhaust and potentially fouled spark plugs. After the oil stops dribbling out, shut the petcock and enjoy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Rogers - South of the Adirondacks on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 09:21 am:

Given it's history what do you suppose is the life expectancy of this topic?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 09:34 am:

3 more days!! (couldn't resist!) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 10:32 am:

I've been adding pages to my website for these eternal subjects. As Model T's move to new owners, those owners have questions, so some of the same questions come up often. It's easier to post a link than to retype the same explanation over and over. I guess I need to make it one of my winter projects to do a page on oil. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 10:35 am:

A noble effort Steve, thankyou! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By thomas elliott nw pa on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 11:53 am:

I did not post this question to bring up the topic of "what oil to use" read the question, I am wondering what had been put in my motor after rebuild. Allen Bennett's answer may, I hope, be what the lube was, but I have never seen anything quite like it. thank you guys for having a look. I hate to think of the work and dollars that I have in this car now and that as a last thing I'll have to pull the motor if it isn't right! I do not know the builder of the motor, a shop that does restoration in Cleveland O. is all I know. Now on to paint, upholstery, new glass, top and hundreds of details.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 01:19 pm:

Thomas,
Did you keep the mystery stuff? If so, watch to see if water separates out from the oil--that would be your answer.
This is a good mystery, hope someone here can solve it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Whaley, Caledon Ontario Canada on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 06:24 pm:

Thomas, Lucas engine oil additive will turn your oil a nasty shade of grey. Doesn't hurt anything, but will make you look twice after seeing it in oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By thomas elliott nw pa on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 09:22 pm:

To David Dewey, yes I did let the stuff I drained out set for a few days to see if it would separate, when it didn't then I thought it must be something that I just hadn't seen before, and a Lucas oil treatment could have been an adder tho' I have never used it so don't know what it would look like. thanks again guys, I'm feeling a little better about it but I'm still going to open the pan before I start it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 10:31 pm:

Well, leave it to Lucas to make something that would look like water got in your oil!!
:-)

Thomas; I never heard of it before either! Hope that solves the mystery.


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