Variable Speed Polisher For Brass

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Variable Speed Polisher For Brass
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 11:36 am:

I've looked online, but can't find a variable speed polisher that does what I want it to do.

Conceptually, it's this: A small electric motor (perhaps 1/4 HP) spinning at 1725 rpm, but controllable down to about 150 rpm, very much the way a dimmer switch works with a light fixture or ceiling fan.

On the motor's shaft, I want to install the polishing bonnet wheel; this I can figure out.

With a foot pedal, I want to control the speed of the motor, similar to a sewing machine.

Has anyone home-built a unit similar to what I'm describing?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Perry Goble on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 12:00 pm:

How a bout taking a variable speed drill put a flexible long drill bit extension in it . Put your polishing wheel in the end of the extension . Put your drill on the floor in a vice and press the trigger with your foot. Just a idea.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Sommers on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 12:28 pm:

I bought this at Harbor Freight. It's only $50 and works well.

Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 04:18 pm:

Mike;

I've looked through Harbor Freight's website, but can't seem to find it.

I'd appreciate it if you would look for any part numbers or identifying items where I could narrow down my search.

I believe the item/kit in the picture may very well be what I'm looking for.

Thank you, Mike.

Bill Everett


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Sommers on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 04:35 pm:

For me, this works great on small areas. The shaft size it uses is 3/16" which means that a 1/4" shaft cannot be used. But, for me, I use a bench grinder with an 8" polishing wheel and Jewelers Rouge, and the flex shaft for detail work.
Regards,
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 07:07 pm:

If you want to destroy your brass, you have a great idea! Go for it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter B. Ratledge on Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 09:22 pm:

I agree with Larry, I try to never buff brass, unless it is in terrible shape. Try to use a chemical cleaner first.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:40 am:

You guys don't think an orbital buffer would be okay?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 12:48 pm:

I want to be able to polish the areas too small to reach with my cloth covered pinkie.

The thought I had was to have a slow turning polishing pad or cone, satured with Simichrome or Prism, to get those hard-to-reach small areas truly polished out. Then, a clean pad or cone, slowly turning, to buff out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 12:48 pm:

Saturated, not satured!


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