Welding cast iron

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Welding cast iron
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Bender Tulsa Oklahoma on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 09:13 am:

This early/mid 1912 block showed up yesterday. The timing gear area had been repaired at some point in it's history but broke off again while being transported to my shop. There is only a couple of small clean (bright) spots where the repair was holding.
Any experience using Muggy Weld 77. Go here for web site. muggyweld.com
I am leaning towards using their rod and a Tig.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 09:32 am:

you might want to send a pm to Peter see this thread
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/534405.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:00 am:

A good friend and long time owner of a engine rebuild shop uses this procedure. He uses 303 SS flux core wire (Lincoln NR-211-MP ..035 ). Weld 1/2" and peen as it cools completely to room temperature. Grind the stop and go again. You will spend all day or maybe longer doing that project but this guy swears by this technique and material. I've seen his work and it looks good and is water tight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:55 am:

You want to keep the weld area repair Austenitic so it doesn't harden and become brittle. Muggy weld doesn't want to give you the composition but I would guess its 77 percent nickel. That would make the weld an Austenitic nickel iron alloy with some ductility.

The stainless wire would act similarly. My suggestion would be to try either or both out on a junk block first. Muggy weld wants you to preheat the block significantly so when the weld area cools it cools slowly. Both Muggy weld and Les emphasize peening.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Owens on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 12:17 pm:

Anybody can weld cast iron. But cast iron does not like to be welded. There are other choices. I shake my head why some people still work there tail off to see there work crack again. Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 12:33 pm:

The same oven I use for cleaning blocks would work well for heating for welding. It does not take much energy to 600 degrees.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 12:39 pm:

years ago a friend helped me repair a Fairmont Motor car engine--these aren't so common that one just goes out and gets another block. He used a high nickel rod as I recall, he'd arc weld a little ways, not even 5 minutes. as it cooled we'd ball peen the area. Then another little weld & ball peen. When done there was little grinding to do and once painted, the repair was invisible. Still together some 15 years (or more!) later.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 12:53 pm:

I have used A and A Welding out here is California to weld cast iron, he does it right, has a large oven and goes through the heating/cooling process. He does very rare engine repair for a lot of people out here. I used him after I saw his work on various cast iron blocks.

http://www.aandaweldinginc.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 01:43 pm:

mike dont mess around with junk, take it to a pro theres one right up the road in Wichita. his name is Ben alyea ph3620 262 4185.IT WILL TAKE SOME TIME BUT WORTH THE WAIT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! CHARLEY


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 01:55 pm:

Charley's got a point, the block is too valuable to "experiment" on, and you don't want to ship it anywhere, you want to take it in person to someone and pick it up in person.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 02:12 pm:

The oven heating process using cast iron rod works well and if I was welding a rear main back into a early T block, that would be my process of choice. The repair being discussed has no great mechanical load. It needs to ultimately be leak tite, look good and withstand the associated bolting loads (which are not great). If it was my block I would take it to my friend. I plan to practice his technique on a project where I am adding a starter to a cast iron RHD hogshead. This hogshead has already been brazed once by a previous person so it seems like a good candidate. Ultimately I will die check or mag particle check to be sure I have no cracks when I'm finished. The loads are similar to what Mike is facing


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Monday, June 27, 2016 - 02:14 pm:

I used the oven heated process to repair a NRS cylinder and a the "fan blade spokes" on a NRS flywheel. Properly done it is as good as a original casting


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