Coil testing with simple tools

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Coil testing with simple tools
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Laughary on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 11:26 am:

I need to check my coils Without shipping them away or purchasing the coil testing tools that I've seen on YouTube.

Can someone direct me a diagram of how to connect my Handheld tools to test and adjust each coil?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 11:39 am:

Really doesn't work that way, Chris. There are specific tools needed to adjust them so as to operate in their maximum capacity for a smooth running Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Laughary on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 11:59 am:

1.3 amps is the adjustment I saw on the videos. Don't I just need to know where to connect the 6 V battery and meter?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 12:07 pm:

You may want to review this post -
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/398352.html?1383499840


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 12:23 pm:

Don't automatically presume you have to own the equipment or send the coils off to have them adjusted. My father and I both have properly adjusted coils using hand cranked coil tester yet we don't own one. That is because an acquaintance of ours has one.

Try to find other Model T owners in your area and see if any of them have a hand cranked coil tester ("HCCT"), a John Regan Strobo Spark or a Mike Kosser Electronically Cranked Coil Tester ("ECCT") and are willing assist you in setting up the coils.

Note that there are some things you need to do to set up a coil even before you put it on an HCCT (ex. testing for continuity, and quality control issues such making sure the contacts are aligned and gapped, etc.).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Kossor - Kenilworth, NJ on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 12:41 pm:

Chris, Testing a coil with the proper tool is very easy, however, adjusting a coil for optimal performance is another matter which requires knowledge, proper tools, a little skill and sometimes patience to get the coil points set properly. Erik makes a great suggestion to find someone in your area that can provide some guidance. Good luck and let us know how you make out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 01:22 pm:

Chris to add to the information you are going to receive, remember you do not need a microprocessor to test the coil to tell you if the coil is working.

Until Bell lab perfected the transistor and Intel the microprocessor or all coils were adjusted in the following:

http://www.nwvs.org/Technical/MTFCA/Articles/2102IgnitionSystem.pdf

A reprint of a circa 1920 Ford Technical article on the coil and the ignition system with suggestion on coil testing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 03:23 pm:

It doesn't get any easier that this Chris. 2 pieces of wire a bit of coat hanger a vice and a toy train transformer. using the AC terminals. Unfortunately beyond telling you it works it doesn't tell you how well it's working. Your car will run but will run alot better with HCCT'd coils.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 04:41 pm:

You can also fry that coil allowing the spark to jump such a large gap. Keep it at 1/4" and no damage will be done. More than that and you are just asking for it to start sparking internally.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hagerty on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 04:44 pm:

And when it chooses your hand as a "path of least resistance" lesson learned!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 05:23 pm:

Just FYI the article George posted the link to is incomplete. It makes no mention of double-sparking nor how to remedy it. If a person is going to do a proper rebuild, it must be done completely and not just slapping contact pair on a coil.

Regards all,
Garnet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 05:55 pm:

And there are some bad new contact points out there!
I made a tester using a toy train transformer, with a meter and a 1/4" spark gap. Loaned the thing out and now I'm not certain where it is. Oh well, I'll start rebuilding the home-made HCCT I just got. Already ordered new ammeter for it, the one on it doesn't really measure much below 2 amps! I have no idea how the previous owner set coils with it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Laughary on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 06:43 pm:

Thank You

I got a good sparked gap from all four cylinders today, and discovered my pliers weren't as well insulated as I thought.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 07:18 pm:

Ah yes the pros and cons of the infamous double spark.

All I know about the Model T, and the mysteries of it's ignition system, I learned from mentors and the Dykes Automobile Manual. And contrary to some, the double spark is a good thing, as found within the instructions on using the HCCT.

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/478679.html?1411211740


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Thursday, June 30, 2016 - 07:24 pm:

Use a screwdriver and short out one spark plug at a time. You should get a nice blue spark about 1/4 inch long. If all four coils give you a spark like this then they will run your engine.


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