A.C Miller & Co. Commercial Bodies

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: A.C Miller & Co. Commercial Bodies
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Doty New Salisbury, IN on Friday, July 08, 2016 - 12:49 pm:

My friend and coworker Trevor Miller just shared these 2 photos from his family's business in Atlanta, GA. They started out making wagons and moved into commercial bodies.

I'm posting these pictures here with Trevor's permission to see if any of you have any additional info on this commercial body company, have any sales literature, or know of any A. C Miller bodies from the T era that still exist.


This fleet of delivery trucks was for Rich's, a department store in Atlanta.

Richs fleet


A.C. Miller wagon




Thank you


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Doty New Salisbury, IN on Friday, July 08, 2016 - 01:02 pm:

Started in 1889 by Andrew Curtin Miller.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, July 08, 2016 - 08:42 pm:

Kim,

Nice photo of the 1915 – 16 style chassis with a delivery wagon body. And based on the brass trim – I would say 1915 style chassis.



Note in the enlarged and cropped photo above the first car on the right does Not appear to have a bulb horn mounted on the dash. Note the second vehicle clearly does have a bulb horn. Looking at the photo the 1st and 3rd cars from the right do not have a visible bulb horn or bulb horn tube. But the 2nd, 4th, & 5th clearly do have a visible bulb horn tube. After that I cannot see clearly enough from the photo if they do or do not have a bulb horn tube. If you could speak with your friend Trevor and ask him if it is possible to obtain a higher resolution scan of that photo, it may provide some addition interesting details. For example does the first car possibly have an electric horn?

All the cars I can see appear to have the 1915-16 style headlamps, windshield, front fenders and on the first one the 1915-16 rear fenders. And of the ones I can see clearly they also all appear to have the brass trim on the side lamps and headlamps which would lead me to believe they were 1915 chassis.

While I have not found any additional A. C. Miller & Co bodies from the Model T era, there is an existing 1938 A. C. Miller & Co on display at the National Park Service -- Tuskegee Institute, AL 36088. From the link at:
https://www.nps.gov/museum/exhibits/tuskegee/lgimage/gwc32.htm it is shown below:



And it has the following information posted about the truck:

Panel Truck (Jesup Agricultural Wagon) Model 60 chassis manufactured by the White Motor Company, 1930. Serial #60-170765. Six cylinder engine with manual drive. The truck body was added by Tuskegee Institute. Present body was built by A. C. Miller & Co., Atlanta, GA. in 1938. Chassis has dual wheels on rear. Exterior is sheet metal, the interior is plywood, oak frame, waterproof canvas top and imitation leather seats. The wagon has two rear doors.
H 257, W 256, L 602 cm
Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site
TUIN 1417 Agents and rural nurse with movable school
n.d.
National Archives and Records Administration
NARA #16-G-280-S-2544C

From the National Park Link at: https://www.nps.gov/museum/exhibits/tuskegee/gwcwagon.htm

It shares: “Washington directed his faculty to "take their teaching into the community." Carver responded by designing a "movable school" that students built. The wagon was named for Morris K. Jesup, a New York financier who gave Washington the money to equip and operate the "movable school." The first movable school was a horse-drawn vehicle called a Jesup Agricultural Wagon. Later it was a mechanized truck, still called a Jesup Wagon, that carried agricultural exhibits to county fairs and community gatherings.
By 1930, the "Booker T. Washington Agricultural School on Wheels" carried a nurse, a home demonstration agent, an agricultural agent, and an architect to share the latest techniques with rural people. Later, community services were expanded, and educational films and lectures were circulated in local churches and schools. The "movable school" was the cornerstone of Tuskegee's extension services and epitomized the Institute's doctrines of self-sufficiency and self-improvement.”

Their contact information is:

Mailing Address:
1212 West Montgomery Road
Tuskegee Institute, AL 36088

Phone: (334) 727-3200

If you use the Google search of Google books, you will find several references to A. C. Miller purchasing land in Atlanta for a truck body plant during the 1920s.

Hopefully someone will be able to post some Model T photos with the A. C. Miller bodies.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Lloid on Friday, July 08, 2016 - 08:55 pm:

I lived in the Atlanta metro area for ten years. Glad to be gone just to much traffic among other things!! I live near Chattanooga Tn now and we have a Miller body company up here they outfit 1 ton and bigger trucks with there beds and different bodies. The picture is great. Tim


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration