First time changing a clincher tire - started as a nightmare ...

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: First time changing a clincher tire - started as a nightmare ...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joerg Walther - FarFarAway (Germany) on Sunday, July 17, 2016 - 09:54 am:

... but ended well at last.

After so many weeks of bad weather here in the middle of Germany (last month with storms and heavy rain even causing small streams to flood villages within minutes and then changing to hot and humid) the frustration not to be able to drive grew and I took the decision to change a very old 'Universal' front tire on my 1916 T instead.

It must have been mounted some decades ago and whatever I tried (and I read a much good tips here) it was not possible to separate it from the rim at any spot.

After three hours I decided to do it the hard way and took the jigsaw. Boy are those tires tough ! Another two hours later it was done and the remains were lying in the yard.

Next day (after being 'trained' by several youtube videos) I started to mount the new Firestone 30x3. Powdered and slightly inflated the tube, flap in place, tire heated up in the sun, tire rim greased with vaseline - all easy.

Started by inserting the valve to the rim, secured it with a (now I know too small) screw clamp and worked around with - only one - mounting iron.
Three hours later I had to admit that I would never be able to mount the tire more than half way.

Imagine my frustration level being in the red alert zone.
After some days of calming down I decided to order a new set of two tire irons with firm grips and the next weekend started over.

What should I say - it made all the difference.
Additionally I now secured the valve part with two strips of duct tape and after thirty minutes the tire set on the rim as it should.

Now two weeks later and after a short and slow test drive it still sits and holds the pressure so I assume I made it.

I only can bow to the uncounted heroes that managed to do that on the side of the road some 100 years ago !!!

Cheers, Joerg


A case for the jigsaw ...

A case for the jigsaw

Take this ...

Take this ...

R.I.P.

R.I.P.

The new start

The start

DONE !!!

DONE !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andy Clary on Sunday, July 17, 2016 - 11:41 am:

Joerg, your first clincher can be a real frustrating experience. Then you figure it out and it isn't so bad. Unfortunately, 5 years later you forgot the trick:-)

Andy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, July 17, 2016 - 12:19 pm:

Shame you had to lose a good inner tube though. Interesting tire irons you bought, I've not seen those before, but then I have "vintage" ones I use. Also Honda motorcycles sell a nice one for about $15.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Sunday, July 17, 2016 - 12:43 pm:

I have no doubt but that the early tires were much more flexible than the ones we are dealing with today. When you read the period stories of a days drive into the country with 3 or more tire punctures it is hard to believe the automobile would have ever caught on if it took an hour to mount a tire. I think most of the tire problems were the result of under inflated tires resulting in rim cuts. Having pumped up tires on the road by hand with a tire pump it isn't easy to get up to the minimum 55 pounds of pressure you need for a clincher.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Sunday, July 17, 2016 - 02:18 pm:

Joerg,

When I changed my first clincher I found I needed to use a large C-clamp to pinch the bead and break it loose from the rim. And, you need at least two tire irons.

There's a story of a man at the Highland Park Plant that routinely mounted 300 tires a shift. We both have a ways to go to match him,


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Sunday, July 17, 2016 - 04:38 pm:

Hi Joerg - First, I'm no expert. I've changed 5 tires so far and like Thomas, I use C clamps with 6" pieces of wood to break the bead. But I take the wheels off car. I can't imagine trying to change a tire with the wheels on. I have a nice set of knee pads with hard plastic covers. I can use my knees to hold what I've got and still have both hands free to brandish the irons. I start at the stem and work up symmetrically. I haven't had to tape the tire in place on the rim. Leaving the tires bake in the sun for 45 minutes to an hour until their hot to the touch helps a lot. And you have to stare at it for a while before you start to put the Ju-Ju on it. But I think it would be a lot easier if the wheel were off the car and flat on the floor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, July 17, 2016 - 05:07 pm:

If you use the weight of the car to hold the tire in place it is really easy. See here:

http://modelt.org/discus/messages/2/32845.html?1314150377


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Blake, Kansas City on Sunday, July 17, 2016 - 05:10 pm:

Val, I'm sure underinflation was responsible for many failures. However, don't forget that the roads were still shared with many horse drawn vehicles and many horseshoe nails were being left behind by those horses.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Sunday, July 17, 2016 - 07:30 pm:

You will find that once installed it will be a lot easier to fix any problems when you need to remove the tube in future.

Once stretched onto the rim the tires become a lot easier to remove and install. So much so you can often remount the tire with you hands and without levers.

As Joerg noted left on the rim for really long periods results in the tires not only becoming rock hard but often they stick to the rim so hard the only way to get them off is to destroy the tire.

Something one does not need to do if you are miles from home with a flat and no replacement tire.

I always amazes me that people don't carry the tools to change a tire with them when they go out in their car. At a recent car show nearby a friend went to with his 1912 touring he heard a loud bang while he was parked. His front tire had blown out. out of 150 odd cars there only 2 people had car jacks, one couldn't rise high enough as it was low on fluid and no one had a tire pump or tire irons.

As most were later vehicles have a spare and are not beaded edge that may be OK for them but you are going to have to go a long way today to find anyone with the tools to change a BE tire so best you carry your own.

Anyone who owns any car with BE tires need to be able to do so themselves. If you don't want to mess with the tires on your car get an extra wheel and practice removing and replacing the tire at home, then if you ever get a problem away from home you will be able to do something about it. Not a bad idea to mount new tires on a spare rim first before putting it on your car ( no tube needed)

You won't always be in the company of someone who can change it for you. and make sure the tire pump you have is capable of pumping more than a few PSI most new ones are not up to the task.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andria Myers----------Long Beach, CA on Monday, July 18, 2016 - 03:26 am:

First time I had to change a clincher I took it to my friend Bob Schwinck for help. It took us about 2.5 hours. We couldn't break the bead. We were both jumping up and down on it and beating it with rubber mallets. Since that time I am: 1.) happy I have split rims on the roadster!! (I can change them myself), 2.) happy we have Nate Jones Tire Co. in town (they deal in and mount classic car tires), and 3.) have AAA & Hagerty.

For when I do have to deal with clinchers I picked this up at a swap meet (thank you Tony Bowker) -

CLINCHER BEAD BREAKER - works like a charm :-)

clincher bead bkr


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Monday, July 18, 2016 - 08:04 am:

>>>If you use the weight of the car to hold the tire in place it is really easy.<<<

Wait a minute. Are you the guy who changes clinchers without tire tools? I always thought that was a myth.



(Message edited by jesselashcraft on July 18, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, July 18, 2016 - 09:41 am:

Jesse,

Tools are required with certain brands, for example Black Firestone conventional tread and Excelsior tires are very stiff.

The tires that I like to buy mount easily with no tools required. Universal T Driver and any of the white tires for example.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, July 18, 2016 - 12:19 pm:

WOW - I can't believe that you are having that much trouble with mounting tires.

As I explained in the tube post - In Sept of 2013 I bought 4 new tires and tubes from Langs.
It was too cold to mount them that year and I didn't have time in 2014 or 2015 so the tires stayed on the shelf and tubes remained folded up in a box.

This weekend I finally have time and the sun is available to heat the tires, so I began mounting them.
I figured that it would not be easy because the tires have been on my 1919 since before 1964 (52 years) and they are slightly hard! :-)
I only had time to do three because I fit the T work between other projects and a bit of shopping.

There were almost no problems once I remembered to leave them in the sun long enough to make them soft.
In fact it was easiest when I had to put glove on because they were almost too hot to handle.

It was a surprise to learn that that I had been supersized. (The tires are listed as "Oversized")
I have already cut the header on the garage doorway so the car could fit in the garage and I hope I don't have to remove more of the header! :-)



I had the camera at an angle so you are looking at the real height difference.
Does having bigger tires make my T a hot rod?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, July 18, 2016 - 12:46 pm:


Carry the right jack and you don't have to worry about hydraulic fluid leaking out. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Thomas Mullin on Monday, July 18, 2016 - 01:23 pm:

s\Steve, what if its the left wheel with the problem?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Monday, July 18, 2016 - 01:29 pm:

>>>Tools are required with certain brands, for example Black Firestone conventional tread...tires are very stiff.<<<

Yeah, that's what I'm using. I couldn't imagine not using tire irons on them unless I was a Paul Bunyan or John Henry type.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, July 18, 2016 - 01:53 pm:

Thomas, just turn the jack around.


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