Rear End Ratios

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Rear End Ratios
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Thursday, July 21, 2016 - 03:57 pm:

Besides the 3 to 1 recently on the forum, what other stock ratios were available during T production?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, July 21, 2016 - 04:00 pm:

Standard is 3.64 to 1. I think you can make a 3.25 to 1 using parts from Chaffins or the other T vendors.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, July 21, 2016 - 04:04 pm:

3:1 was never stock. Ford offered 3.636:1 or 11:40 on almost all T's and 4:1 as an option on some heavy bodied cars like Centerdoor Sedans and Fordors from about 1920.

TT trucks had 7.15:1 and 5.25:1 as options, and they were very slow - but could take heavy loads.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Thursday, July 21, 2016 - 04:15 pm:

The reason I asked is because I do not want a 3 to 1.

Years ago, I acquired a rear-end that was being rebuilt, and I never thought to ask what the ratio in it was. I'm now getting around to installing it into a speedster project.

The rear end assembly is on a pallet and easy to get to.

Instead of opening the housings and counting teeth, I thought I'd put an adjustable wrench onto the U-Joint and turn it about 20 times.

I'd also keep count of how many times the axle turned, and then do the math.

My question is this: without something to prevent one of the axle shafts from turning, will I get an accurate reading on the number of turns of the axle that I'm watching?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, July 21, 2016 - 04:29 pm:

The chances are about 10-1 it's a standard ratio axle, but if you put tape that extends a bit on both axle ends you'll have a better chance at counting the turns of them.
The differential makes the axle with the least friction turn - and if the internal friction inside the diff housing is higher, both axles will turn the same.
If one axle has more friction you may have to take the mean out of both - if one axle has turned one and a half turn, but the other one just a half, then the mean would be one turn. If one axle is stuck, the other will turn double speed, making two turns so the mean out of both will be one turn = one turn of the ring gear.

Just ask if anything still seems unclear & I'll try to confuse you some more :-)

https://youtu.be/yYAw79386WI


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