Replacing Brake Cam and Bushing

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Replacing Brake Cam and Bushing
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gerry Hibbs on Saturday, July 23, 2016 - 08:54 pm:

With a newly acquired T, I wanted to add some stopping power without breaking the bank, so I ordered an emergency brake rebuilding kit with the lined shoes, springs, cams, cam lever pins, and cam bushings. I got stuck almost immediately trying to remove the brake cam lever, and also struggled with replacing the bushing.

There are several entries in the forum including
THIS ONE
offering solutions that did not work for me. They must have worked for someone. Perhaps I lack the basic mechanical finesse to apply them correctly.

Failure 1: To remove the cam lever I tried drilling out the old pins, which I found awkward while still on the car and kept breaking bits. I didn't see any room to ". . . sneak a hacksaw blade between the bushing and the arm attached to the cam and cut it off . . . ." Somewhere else I read that you should use a heavy clamp with a socket over the cam to put pressure on the cam shaft and shear off the pins. My clamp started to bend, so maybe it was not stout enough.

Failure 2: To get the old bushing out and simultaneously insert the new bushing I tried threading the new bushing on a long bolt that just fits inside the bushing, then fitting that into the old bushing so you can tap the head of the bolt which pushes the old bushing out and the new one on. This was a non-starter for me, as no matter how I tapped, thumped, or wanged on the bolt, the old bushing did not budge, penetrating oil to the contrary. Maybe my old bushings were unusually snug.
Now, admittedly I did not do it exactly as stated. I used a bolt which, though long enough, was of lesser circumference. I made it fit snug in the bushings by wrapping it with duck tape. Still, I don't see how this would make a difference.

Here, then, for other klutzes everywhere, is my procedure for replacing the cam bushing, with fits and starts deleted.

With the wheel and brake shoes off:

Step 1. Use/Buy an angle grinder and cut off the old cam. Cut the cam itself since that's the part that's easy to get too. Yes, it is thick, but at least it's accessible. Take care to only grind on the cam and not the other stuff. By pushing the cam shaft from the other side, you can give yourself a little more room to avoid the plate and the nuts. A flame-resistent assistant can do this for you.
After hammering, fussing, and pondering the problem for a few weeks, I did not regret the cost at all, especially since I had to use the grinder almost immediately to shave down a replacement bolt for the hub. The brake kit came with new cams anyway, and it was shear joy to see the old one submit. Burn baby! Burn!

Step 2.
Option 1. Use/Buy new cam levers.
After messing up the one lever trying to drill out the pins, I bought new ones for both sides.
Option 2. Drill out the pins and salvage the old levers after the cam is removed and drilling the pins out isn't so awkward.

Step 3. Spray the bushing with penetrating oil. Wait a while, like over night.
This is the only step that matches any of the others I've read, though I am beholden to their postings in more subtle ways.

Step 4. From a socket wrench set, pick out a socket larger that the bushing will fit into, a longish bolt that will fit through the socket's hole, a matching nut, and a washer larger than the bushing. (You can mess up your socket, so use one from the metric set that doesn't fit anything on your T!) Place the socket on the outside of the backing plate so that it straddles the bushing: The circles of the bushing and the socket should be concentric so that the bushing can slide into the socket. Thread the bolt through the socket and out the back through the bushing, and put on the washer and nut. From outside in it will be bolt head, socket, back plate, bushing, washer, nut. The head of the bolt will press on the socket and the washer will be pressed onto the bushing by the nut. Tighten the nut until the bushing has moved noticeably toward the outside.
This pushes the bushing the the wrong direction, but breaks it loose. It also may dish out the washer, which helps in the next step. If it doesn't you may want to peen the washer to dish it.
I used a carriage bolt I had handy, which is why the wrench is on the inside of the bolt head for tightening.  It kind of messed up the bolt, but I didn't care.
It moved!

Step 5. Reverse the above assembly so that now from outside in you have the nut, washer, bushing, back plate, socket, and bolt head. Tighten the nut and bolt so as to push the bushing as far as possible toward the inside. If the washer got dished, the bushing will get counter sunk a little bit.
This is a better picture for seeing how things line up.
Take the assembly apart.

Step 6. Place the washer on the bolt all the way to the head. Wrap the shaft neatly with duck tape so that the new bushing fits on snuggly over the tape and against the washer, then insert the still exposed part of the duck tape wrapping into the old bushing from the outside.
Alternately, use a bolt that fits snuggly inside the bushings without the duck tape. From the outside in you have bolt head, washer, new bushing, old bushing. Now, either tap the head of the bolt with a hammer, or place the socket over the bolt on the inside, screw the nut down over the socket, and tighten. Whichever way you go, be careful at the onset to get the two bushings lined up so as not to damage the new one. If the old bushing is countersunk, that helps.

Step 7. Once the new bushing is well started into the hole, abandon care and hammer away on the bolt head until the new bushing is flush against the backing plate. Mine was a little crooked, so for "precision" hammering I laid a flathead screwdriver on the cam's exposed side and hammered on the screwdriver.

QED

To save someone else the trouble, I will add here that when you mount the wheel, tighten the nut well, drive a bit, and tighten again. Repeat ad nauseum.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Goodheart, Edwards, NY on Saturday, July 23, 2016 - 09:39 pm:

I drilled out the pins, got new cam arms, bushings and cams. Bought the correct bushing driver from Lang's which worked perfectly to drive out the old bushings and install the new ones. Took about 15 minutes to remove and install both bushings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gerry Hibbs on Saturday, July 23, 2016 - 10:03 pm:

Good for you, Mr. Goodheart! Looks like we both wound up buying new arms. As mentioned, I had difficulty drilling the pins, so you must have the magic touch. No doubt the special bushing driver made things easy and fast for you. I don't claim any 15 minutes for both--perhaps an hour without all the back


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gerry Hibbs on Saturday, July 23, 2016 - 10:06 pm:

. . .

(Message edited by gerry_in_denver on July 23, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gerry Hibbs on Saturday, July 23, 2016 - 10:09 pm:

. . . and forth.

(Message edited by gerry_in_denver on July 23, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, July 23, 2016 - 11:00 pm:

Fellows, I never drill pins out completely. It's too hard to get the drill to come out the other side in the correct place!!!

Rather, I start with a smaller than expected drill and drill 3/4 of the way through. Then upsize the drill and go again. If you upsize until the drill is cutting down the side of the pin, you have it licked. Then select a pin punch and drive out the weakened rivet, utilising the stop at the end of you 3/4 depth hole.

It works most of the time.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, July 24, 2016 - 01:22 am:

I have had to drill the rivets from both sides to be able to get Ford brake arms off. No way to get the old rivets to budge with any driver..
Neither have I been able to drive out any thin walled steel bushings - only method that works for me is to cut through the bushing with a hack saw blade in one or two areas, then drive it out with a chisel..
But the T stuff over here is usually really really rusty.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Goodheart, Edwards, NY on Sunday, July 24, 2016 - 08:11 am:

Of course the 15 minutes did not include the drilling, that took much, much longer. I used the method described by Allan Bennett. I dulled many drill bits, and bloodied both knuckles before I got the pins out. The bushings did come out easy. Having the correct size driver does help and the axle is completely removed from the car which makes things easier. I too am a newbie with the T, and continue to ask stupid questions. This is the first time I have tried to remove and replace bushings.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gerry Hibbs on Sunday, July 24, 2016 - 09:47 am:

I just had great difficulty crawling under the car and getting the cam to hold still while drilling. Is there a trick to it? Since I had new cams anyway, cutting the old ones off worked out very well--just another option for the other klutzes among us.
Plus, I now have an angle grinder! I love the smell of new tools in the morning!
Had I cut the cams off in the first place, I might have been able to get the pins drilled out and salvaged the cam arms.

(Message edited by gerry_in_denver on July 24, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, July 24, 2016 - 09:53 am:

I grind the heads and tails off the rivets with a high speed abrasive wheel. Then you can punch out the rivets with a pin punch. Or, if the cams and levers are obviously too worn to save, just cut them off with a high speed cutoff wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Sunday, July 24, 2016 - 09:59 am:

I'm working on mine too. I removed the axle/driveshaft assembly from the car so I could work on a bench. I was able to drive out the pins with a small hammer and a punch. I was able to reuse them too. It took some time though, the pins were tough to the end. The brake cams slid of just nicely.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, July 24, 2016 - 02:44 pm:

You can use the steel bushings but I have started using the brass like the early cars. As suggested above, I cut the bushing using one of those hacksaw blade holder for doing tight work, then drive the pieces out. Clean up the holes with a rat tail file to get rid of burrs, rust and other nasty stuff that causes the new bushing to bind on install. You will need a ream to finish the bushings after they are installed, don't try and just drive the shackles in like a car I am working on now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Sunday, July 24, 2016 - 08:07 pm:

It's a heck of a lot easier to do with the axle housings out of the car. It's a pain in the ass even then! Yes, do use brass, and be sure to get your cams on the correct side. There is a right and a left.


Add a Message


This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Username:  
Password:

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration