Shocking question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Shocking question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Compton on Sunday, July 24, 2016 - 09:36 pm:

Has anyone ever tried installing Model A type shocks on a T ? I'm not having my car judged, and just want to improve the driveability a little. My biggest concern is the frame strength at the front besides wondering if they would really make that much difference. Comments???? Thanks : Bruce


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 03:08 am:

Why not? The frame is strong enough. Speedster guys and others has put accessory shocks on T's since they were new without problems.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 06:41 am:

Why bother? Get a Model A shock, and place it next to your car, and then go figure!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 08:10 am:

I doubt that it would be worth all the trouble. Just my 2 cents, adjusted for inflation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 08:10 am:

The Montana 500 crowd run modern tube shocks:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/127436.html?1273351573


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 08:38 am:

Bruce
I've done it. I'll try and come up with some pictures. You get the most benefit on the rear axle. Has to do with the comparatively large "unsprung " weight compared to the weight of the back of the car (coupe is fairly light at the back)
I've watched speedster guys with the back ends bouncing around on "washboard roads" on corners!!!
Is this something you have observed too?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 08:38 am:

Another brilliant comment Larry


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Compton on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 09:34 am:

Thanks for the input guys. I thought I might get banned from the site by asking the question, and I'm impressed with some of the responses. Les, I would really like to see your pictures, and Larry, I don't get your comment. My '25 coupe gets severely tossed around on the highway by crosswinds and passing vehicles and as well as it bounces a bit on rough paved surfaces which led to the question of installing shocks. I have a few sets of excellent '37 Ford Houdaille shocks (similar to Model A) as well as a few pairs of short tube type shocks to experiment with. Thanks again : Bruce


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 09:41 am:

I've found that severe washboard gives a Model T the tendency to slide about. I wonder if Hasslers do anything to improve that. I've never tried them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Schubert on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 09:46 am:

Bruce
I think your Houdailles would work well
Steve
I suspect the Hasslers could make it worse. The shock absorbers being referred to are actually "dampeners". The Hasslers were a ride "softener"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 11:15 am:

When I installed the Hasslers on my Huckster I only put them on the rear. It seemed to help rear bounce. I did not see the need on the front as there just isn't that much bounce up there, stand on the crank and bounce, see how much movement you get.
I now have a big drum rear axle under her so no Hasslers, there is a difference.
Observations after working with Model A shocks which are similar:
The only issue I could see is you would want the connection between the end of the shock arm and the axle as close to the hub as you could get it. There is a good bit of off set between the frame and end of axle on a Model T compared to where the were mounted on a 37. These shocks were made for up down with minimal side load. If you mounted the links at too great an angle between those points you would be getting maybe too much side load not up down load. The end of the arm on the shock should be more or less over the mounting point on the axle and the closer that is to the outside the better the control over bounce.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin in Katy Texas on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 12:16 pm:

I've done it on my '13. Made a huge difference. I want to do the front shocks too at some point.

I used VW Beetle series 1 shocks on the rear. Just like the thread posted above, the least invasive method is to use a connecting rod with the same big end size as the axle, cut if off and weld a piece of threaded rod onto it. This attaches the lower side of the shock to the axle.

For the upper end, I took a gate roller wheel kit, and used the mounting bracket from it, to hold the upper end of the shock. I had to drill the chassis to mount it, but I am sure someone clever could attach the bracket without drilling...

But it works great, and the car is much smoother at speed.

Hope this helps,
Justin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Compton on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 05:23 pm:

Thanks Justin: I've received enough positive comments now (Roger,Les, and yourself)that I will try something along those lines.I'm assuming that the VW shocks are the tube type. Any chance you could post a picture?? Bruce


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin in Katy Texas on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 06:06 pm:

Of course... Hope this helps. I used old tractor connecting rods and threaded the bolt all the way through the center then welded up. Should be overkill.

As for the top bracket, like I said there is probably a hundred better ways to do it than to copy mine, but here it is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin in Katy Texas on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 06:06 pm:

Of course... Hope this helps. I used old tractor connecting rods and threaded the bolt all the way through the center then welded up. Should be overkill.

As for the top bracket, like I said there is probably a hundred better ways to do it than to copy mine, but here it is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Compton on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 06:56 pm:

WOW. Thanks Justin. Did you do something to prevent the con rod from turning on the axle housing or just really tighten it? Also, what's a series 1 VW? Thanks again : Bruce


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin in Katy Texas on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 09:21 am:

The conrod is a tight fit. I snugged up the threaded rod end first, and then the big end of the rod.

Make that Type 1, sorry about that. I see online a Type 1 is 1950-59.

Regards
Justin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Wilson - Omaha NE on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 09:42 am:

I bought a couple of sets of friction shocks intended for a Rat Rod off of Ebay. They were $39 a pair delivered when I bought them, I think they are more now. I used a 2x2 Oak block to space them out from the frame in front, and used a shackle plate from Speedway motors to attach them to the front axle. I used the clevises used for the brakes to connect them, and they look like they belong.
In back I mounted them 90 degrees from the frame on some "L" brackets, and made a mount from angle iron to bolt to the radius rod bolts.
They really make a difference on my 21 touring. There were some patches of road that would really get the car bucking, and I would almost have to stop to get the car to stop bucking. The shock's really alleviate that problem. Speed bumps are a lot easier to take with shocks also. Overall they make the car feel a lot more grounded


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin in Katy Texas on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 12:04 pm:

Hi Doug,

Would you be able to post pictures of your front shock setup?

I had always heard that one has to use a shock off of a snow mobile or similar, because of the short compressed length needed, so I'm intrigued to see your setup.

Thanks
Justin


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Doug Wilson - Omaha NE on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 01:41 pm:

I'll get some pictures this evening


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