Tie-down points for trailering.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Tie-down points for trailering.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 05:50 pm:

Let's see your ideas for them. I picked up an enclosed trailer, and am equipping it with an electric winch for loading. I am considering making a bracket that attaches to the front motor mount/spring clamp studs, to hook the winch and/or tiedowns to. I plan to use either channel iron or wood, to make "tracks" to guide the tires, and help locate the car side-to-side. In the past on open trailers, I have used two steel clevises, one on each side of the front spring, and strapped cris-cross from them to the front corners of the trailer. In the rear I used a 2 inch nylon ratchet strap running from one corner of the trailer, under the rear spring and across the top of the frame, then under the rear spring to the other corner of the trailer. I like to load the suspension of the T, to keep it from bouncing on the trailer. Thoughts?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 06:45 pm:

Ed,

Harbor Freight 9K or 12K electric winch mounted on winch plate which is mounted at least 3 to 4 inches above floor on wood so roller fairlead that mounts to winch plate clears floor.

Both are overkill for a Model T but both have slow speed & 12K has drum tensioner that helps minimize cable tangle.

Harbor Freight wireless remote control.

50K rated etrac mounted on top of floor with 1/4" carriage bolts - fender & lock washers underneath.

I hit every hole first (6) on either end - then every other hole.

I run my etrac width wise across the trailer at several points because I haul different types of vehicles & cargo.


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Sims--Reed City,Mich. on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 06:48 pm:

My opinion is that loading the springs is not a good idea. If you hit a bad bump with the trailer it could further compress the springs and then on the rebound it will violently jerk your straps. Also I do not like to cross the straps because it might allow the side of the axle to lift. I can not prove either of these theorys but it might happen.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Rose on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 07:02 pm:

I agree with Jim Sims: hook you tiedowns to the axles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 07:05 pm:

Jim,

I cross straps on most vehicles I haul - it prevents shifting.

I use (4) straps - I don't anticipate them failing because they are always nearly new - I rotate use.


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 07:10 pm:

Ed, Why not just drive it in? Is your trailer so small that you can't get out after you get it in, Mine is almost.

I tie mine to the front axle only. I have a criss-cross in the front and another going to the back to prevent forward moving. It's a good idea to mount some of the rubber stops on the floor from HF so your T sits at the same place every time after you get the right balance. That's most important for good towing.

I think the straps over the wheels are really good but I have not used them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 07:42 pm:

Good points. I am leery of tying to the axles, as I don't want to yank forward on the front wishbone, and rearward on the ball cap. I believe that new cars are hauled to dealerships with chains from the frame, holding the suspension compressed? I have hauled vehicles for years the way I am proposing, and never had one shift. (Yet) :-) What have you guys done for a front pulling point?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 07:50 pm:

I haven't done it yet, but it seems the straps that go over the wheels should be the best bet. It isn't a good idea to put a whole lot of tension on the front or rear axle housings, because they can bend easily.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell, Huntsville, AL on Monday, July 25, 2016 - 10:59 pm:

Ed, Once I determine the load point I installed a pair of motorcycle wheel chock similar to these http://www.discountramps.com/motorcycle-wheel-chocks/p/MC-CH-CHOCKS/ It puts the car in the same place each time I load and gives extra stability. I do cross tie from the axels using short straps similar to these http://www.uscargocontrol.com/Towing-Auto-Hauling/Wheel-Nets-Auto-Car-Tie-Downs/ 2-Axle-Strap-Wear-Sleeve-is-included around the perches and axle on the front, and the axle on the rear.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan McEachern on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 12:14 am:

I used a new set of basket straps on one of the cars we hauled to Albuquerque for the national tour and the car showed no signs of moving at all in the trailer. I really like them after years of using ratchet straps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 08:25 am:

Since I don't have a dedicated T trailer, I can't help with the tire tracks or stop blocks. But the few times I've put my car in or on a trailer, I tied to the frame. I just felt safer because I knew it wouldn't damage axles that way. When I bought the car a previous owner put eye bolts on the back of the frame as tie down points.

I think it depends on how much load you put on the suspension. With a T having transverse springs the body would (at least in my mind) want to sway left and right, so if you put equal tension on all four corners of the frame it theoretically wouldn't roll much if at all. Maybe I'm overthinking it, or maybe underthinking it. The important thing is I got there with the car in one piece. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 08:44 am:


There are basket straps, and there are basket straps, so choose well. These on a U-Haul trailer were useless. Every time I stopped, I found they had fallen off. Fortunately I had the car fastened down with my own ratchet straps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John L Williams on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 10:49 am:

Hi From Iowa: I just thought I'd throw in my 2 cents (prob all it's worth)? I have hauled cars for myself & others over 50 years & even had a collector car hauling buiss for 10 years before deciding to get a town job so I could spend more time with my young boys! When it comes to Ts - they need special treatment because of the way they are put together! I have seen a 2 piece torch tube drive line actually pulled a part because of hooking to the axles & I have heard of the same with the wishbone on the front! I have never had or heard of a prob by hooking to the frame front & rear! I either hook straight to the corners of the trailer or cross over depending on the haul - trailer or car. This is what works for me - all I can say is always Stay Safe & be careful of yourself & the car!!! I might add that years ago I took someone's suggestion & hooked only to the front axle - The back of the car bounced around in my truck on the poor eastern roads that I had to jack & slide the rear over before I could unload at the dock! Have A Good Day - John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 11:26 am:

In my enclosed trailer when I wench my car on I use a soft strap like this.

then in the back of the car I have 2 home-made hooks that also hook to where the spring and frame meet in a cross over fashion. never had a problem even when the trailer was hit by someone not stopping for a light.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carey on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 11:56 am:

Does anybody else crosstie. I tie the front axle toward the back and the back toward the front.
Crossing under the car, lt to rt and rt to lt.
Never had a car move around.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 12:57 pm:

G.R., I have considered tying like that, but I was afraid of cutting the straps. I have been using a clevis at the two points where your straps go between the spring and crossmember. It ain't the best, but black paint is cheap :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 01:03 pm:

For 27 years, I've strapped the front axle to the front of the trailer and the rear axle to the rear. Snug but not overdone. Never had the car move around on my 6 x 12 flatbed trailer. I figure the greatest strain on the straps will be if I hit something (hasn't happened) or I need to brake hard to avoid hitting something. I live in Western Washington and have towed my T's to Kansas a couple times, Mississippi once, and many trips in WA, OR, CA, ID, MT, CO, WY and up into Canada. Maybe I've just been lucky but never had any damage or issues with the cars. Not planning on changing my technique. I figure it would have to be a mighty hard and sudden stop to put damaging strain on either the front or rear axles unless you have 3" straps tightened by the incredible hulk.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 01:04 pm:

Never had one of those straps cut but I do replace them every year they are cheap enough to make it worth the effort. That strap is rated at 6000 lbs and my wench at 10000 lbs. I used a strap just like that to load a 71 mustang with a locked up rearend so I am confident in the load it will support. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wes Nelson ........Bucyrus, MO on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 02:15 pm:

This is what I use for a slow speed short hop..








Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole, Oswego, IL on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 03:16 pm:

If you use a U-Haul, use the basket straps and weave them in and out of the spokes to lock the front wheels and prevent from rolling- on the back I use axle straps over the tubes; works great and that car won't roll anywhere. Done it several times.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 03:23 pm:


Do you guys using wenches find them expensive? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Thomas - Centerville, Iowa on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 03:28 pm:

DOT requites a 4 point tie down. That is 4 straps/chains on 4 separate points. You can have more, but not less. Remember, crossing a strap more than doubles the stress on it, so that 2,000 lb strap is now less than 1,000.

I strap mine with 4 straps, pulling straight back, and then use motorcycle wheel chocks for the front to keep it in exactly the same position for towing, and it also keeps the car from walking from side to side.

I then add two straps at the rear of the trailer, crossed to keep that end from shifting side to side.

Mo straps, mo better.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Whaley, Caledon Ontario Canada on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 03:33 pm:

This is how I tie mine down.....






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Rinaldo on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 05:00 pm:

I have towed several sizes of cars in my enclosed trailer. for many years. I have both e-track and D-rings and use one or the other as well as a combination of each. This set-up gives me a lot of versatility. The cross vs. straight is a lot of personal preference. I generally use a combination of both, either front or rear, There is no need to over tighten the straps,I have seen guys damage springs and axles as well break a cheap strap by over tightening. Buy the best straps you can. Check out places like "snappin turtle", Joe"s. Don't cut corners here, Steve


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Whaley, Caledon Ontario Canada on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 05:13 pm:

Another point to mention is to make sure that the strap goes around the ratchet mechanism more than a full revolution to eliminate loosening


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Tuesday, July 26, 2016 - 10:47 pm:

I have recessed e-track spaced to match the T wheel track. This takes a little time to strap down, but doesn't stress anything on the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Oldland - Perth W.Australia on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 - 03:44 am:

I use Wheel Nets for my Ford T & Maxwell for a few years now, and they hold the car in position very well without stressing the car in any way.

John0
Perth Western australia


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Benedict, Humboldt, TN on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 - 08:03 am:

This works the best for me. No strain on car suspension.open trailer tiedown


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 - 09:26 am:

Seems like, with a few exceptions, the only rule is to tie it down any way that keeps it from moving.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 - 12:07 pm:

I am on my third trailer. First one was open and the last 2 have been enclosed. The system I used on the first trailer was to stretch the T forward and backward by pulling on the axles front and rear. It worked but I wasn't sure about the strain on the pan and others voiced the same concerns. It was not super easy to load up and get the T in proper position but it was not super difficult either. The system I have used on the last 2 trailers is what I like the best because it simply holds the car down to the floor without putting any strain on the suspension or pan. Stretching the T by pulling it forward in front and backward in the rear puts a lot of strain on the wishbones front and rear and that means you are pulling on the engine pan fittings both front and rear. I use wheel nets that are nearly identical to those of John O. that is a couple posts above this. Those hold the wheel down to the floor but in my case there is a D ring at each position in front and back of each wheel thus 8 D rings in all. The D rings are just slightly ahead and behind each wheel as John has pictured. There is room for a wheel chock on each front wheel that I bump into when I am loading the T by driving into the trailer. When I hit the chocks I pull the hand brake and get out and put the nets over each wheel with hook on the back side and the ratchet on the front side or rear side. A couple of pulls on the ratchet and the T is in its usual towing position and ready for any trip long or short. I can load the T in a few minutes and I can also do it without having to change clothes since I don't have to crawl under anything nor get near any of the "greasy" parts of my T. I determined the positions of D rings by putting the T in the trailer (16 foot bed is what I have) and moving it forward and backward while measuring the tongue weight so it tows nice every time.

It works for me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 - 12:32 pm:

Do not know if this has been brought up but. What ever way you use, make use what you hook to on your trailer is as strong or stronger than you straps. "Chain is only as strong as weakest link" Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 - 05:37 pm:

I like the ratchet strap's with the latches on the hooks! If pulling forward and back i think the angle also matters if your pulling more down than forward and back?? Bud. PS,The staying clean would be great!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Kelly Montana on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 - 06:30 pm:

Steve, if you think wenches are expensive, try a horse woman! $$$$$$$$$!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Aldrich Orting Wa on Thursday, July 28, 2016 - 12:20 pm:

I also own an old Uhaul car trailer and the basket straps work fine for me.

I put an additional strap around the rear end/pumpkin to prevent forward motion. Have towed many miles like this.

Just need to run down the road 10 miles or so and then stop and tighten straps. Usually once is enough.


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