Exhaust manifold glowing

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Exhaust manifold glowing
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke----central TX. on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 01:01 am:

I haven't had this happen recently, but a couple times after running for a little while the exhaust manifold would glow red. Is this from my fuel mixture being too rich? Like I said this hasn't happened for a little while, but if it does happen again I would like to know what is causing it. Thanks in advance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Troy Todd on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 01:09 am:

I've had it happen from my timing being retarded.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hagerty on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 01:20 am:

Luke,
A lean mixture raises temperature, rich mixture will lower temperature. A "reading" of the color of your spark plugs will usually be a fair indicator of how well the mixture has been running. That is of course providing there is no significant oily soot from worn piston rings. On the other hand, if there is any "air leak" in one or more places on the intake manifold, that will result in one or more plugs looking quite lean (read HOT!) compared to the others. I learned what can happen from an air leak on a Harley some years ago, a pea sized hole MELTED in the top of an aluminum piston. OUCH! I don't consider myself a T 'expert' but, I have 45+ years of motor experience under my belt. Hope this helps! Let us know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hagerty on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 01:24 am:

Yes, Ditto what Troy said as well. I got the impression this problem is fairly new? But I'm thinking you know the drill as far as timing goes? After I read your post a second time, I see you said "Thanks in advance" Pun intended.....?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke----central TX. on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 01:36 am:

No pun intended. I am actually fairly new on driving T's. I am still figuring out the timing. The first few times I drove Henry he overheated. The last two or three times I have managed not to make him overheat. The first time it overheated was when I saw the manifold glow, haven't seen it since. I plan on taking Henry for a drive around the ranch some time soon to check the work I have done so far (flushed the radiator with vinegar, and replaced exhaust manifold and pipe). I will let y'all know how it goes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hagerty on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 01:48 am:

Well, the best advice on timing has been covered quite well on this forum. If you are new to this particular car, remember they are ALL a little different. It would be wise to NOT judge the actual setting by the lever position. That is UNTIL you have made certain the timer is indexed correctly. There are a few items that will affect such. I won't attempt to copy what the guys here have already said. But, bent control rods and or loose links will have obvious effects!
Cheers!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke----central TX. on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 01:56 am:

Yes sir I have seen many posts on timing and how to set timing correctly. I plan to check the timing next time I get a chance. I hope that flushing the radiator and getting more comfortable with the spark advance/retard will help the overheating problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hagerty on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 02:00 am:

To be more accurate, the control rods ARE bent!
Didn't want to confuse what I meant.
They might need to be CORRECTLY bent once the
timer is indexed.
I better say it before someone else does!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Hagerty on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 02:02 am:

Sounds like you're on the right track.
Keep us posted!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke----central TX. on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 02:07 am:

Is there a way to tell if the timer needs servicing? And if so, what kind of maintenance does it require? I have not done much research on how the timer works or what it needs, and I am just curious.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 05:20 am:

There were hundreds of accessory timers made - much because owners neglected to service the originals. Originals work fine if cleaned and oiled often, though they do wear out as all the others. Clean well - metal mixed goo behind the contact ring may short the contacts.

All styles of accessory timers needs cleaning too, many needs oil or grease.
Clean it and post a picture :-)

(Message edited by Roger K on July 29, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 05:40 am:

Luke, Sometimes all the flushing in the world will not bring a really old radiator back up to efficient heat conduction. Over many, many heat/Cold cycles the tubes and fins no longer contact each other and there is a microscopic gap between them and heat transfer becomes very innificient. At that point a re-Rodding or complete new radiator may be necessary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 06:09 am:

Luke, to me it sounds like a timing issue, you'll need to pull the advance lever down more. On my doodlebug T it ran just fine where I had the levers originally--so I thought. It wasn't until a night time outing I noticed the manifold starting to glow. I first tried adjusting the mixture, to no avail, so I pulled the advance lever down more and it stopped glowing within 30 seconds.

These cars can be tricky especially for new owners, like everyone says, you just need to find what your T likes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 07:50 am:

I see no reason to doubt your radiator until you are sure your timing and mixture are correct. A bad radiator won't make your manifold glow red. That is either LEAN mixture or RETARDED timing.

Others may disagree, but I say advance that thing as far as it will go when driving and if there is no degradation in performance or strange sounds, like detonation, coming from the engine, then leave it there as long as your driving along at highway speed. I would say there is better chance of hurting something by driving with the timing too retarded than too advanced.

As for radiators, rodding one out will get rid of deposits that may have formed inside, but it will NOT fix fins that have turned loose from the tubes. I think Michael may have meant re-coring?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 09:14 am:

What Hal said.
1 Check timing. http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG97.html
2 Adjust carb.
3 http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG96.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnCodman on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 11:19 am:

David Hagerty is correct about lean mixtures raising combustion temperatures. Back in the '70s, Chrysler had it's (in)famous "Lean Burn" system which raised combustion temperatures to burn up the Hydrocarbons and Carbon Monoxide. This was before the Nox standards went into effect. Rich mixtures lower combustion temperatures, but result in a lot of HC (gasoline) leaving the combustion chamber in the exhaust gasses. It's hot, and if there is a leak between the exhaust manifold and engine block, it is a potential source of air. Air plus fuel plus heat will result in the hydrocarbons being reignited and burning in the exhaust manifold and exhaust pipe. Ask me how I know. A new, straight exhaust manifold from Lang's along with a new set of sealing rings solved the problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke----central TX. on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 11:30 am:

Thank all y'all for your help. And I think Hal may be right on this problem. I am leaning toward a timing issue more than anything else. The reason for flushing the radiator was mostly because the car sat in a garage for ten years and I figured it'd do some good to rinse it out.


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