Best cotter pin puller?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Best cotter pin puller?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Laughary on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 09:32 am:

I stumble across this old drum brake spring tool in my box yesterday and it is the best cotter pin puller I've used so far!

Just want to share in case it helps someone save some time. Also, wondering what others have found to work best. Tongs


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 09:42 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Laughary on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 09:45 am:

Holy Moly, Ed!

A Pneumatic Cotter-pusher-outer!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 10:35 am:

The tools I've been using to pull cotter-pins, which have been mostly unsatisfactory, look like these.
None of 'em were made with the intention of pulling cotter-pins, but I purchased them anyway:



I don't know why I bought them to deal with cotter-pins when there are tools that were actually designed to do the job.



Oddly enough, your brake spring tool looks like it would work better than the puller that was created for the job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Laughary on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 10:44 am:

Bob,

I found the second tool you listed was left under the hood of my Mercedes by a dealer tech. They charged me $400 to pop out a $6 rubber grommet and pop a new one in. I'm glad to hear there is a better use for my $400 tool.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 12:37 pm:

Chris,

Mister Obvious here. Note the above clustered pattern of words:

"Mercedes", "$400", "$6 grommet".

Most people are so blinded by the first word that they cannot connect the dots.

Other similar blinding words: Porsche, BMW, and Lexus.

Beware the force of vanity.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Laughary on Friday, July 29, 2016 - 02:47 pm:

Yep, the vanity of choosing that brand cost me a ridiculous amount for poor service at that dealer. I own a limo service, so we use the vehicles people are willing to pay the most for.

The plan for my Model T is to spruce it up to use in wedding photos. Hopefully we will all watch our car values rise as more Ts are pulled out into the public eye and experienced by the new generation of investors. Museums are great, but seeing us on the road is priceless.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 11:06 am:

I've been using diagonal wire cutting pliers for years. Destroys the cotter pin, but so what!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 11:22 am:

I use needle nose pliers and a small hammer. I straighten out the legs with the pliers, then force one side of the nose of the pliers into the loop of the cotter pin. Then, I hammer on the needle nose pliers to drive the pin out. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 11:45 am:

What Mark said.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 12:06 pm:

I bend the legs straight and use a pair of side cutters to lever the pin out. I as you should, never reuse a cotter pin unless it's an emergency. Most of the modern cotter pins are too hard and are prone to fracture and breakage at any nick or bend.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sean Butler Huntington Beach, CA on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 12:09 pm:

I use Mark's method as well. Pretty painless.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Lebeda, Humboldt, SD on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 12:10 pm:

These are all great tools; Iíve been doing what Mark and Corey said. Need to buy more tools for pulling cotter pins! I bought a wire crimper for electrical connections from info on this WEB. Had been using regular pliers and getting poor mechanical/electrical connections.

Now changing brakes/rotors on 2012 Impala. Everyday is a learning experience.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul griesse--Granville,Ohio on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 01:21 pm:

diagional cutters work just fine and they come in several sizes---nothing better in my experience! Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 06:16 pm:

I use a common pair of pliers. Just straighten out the pointed end and then grab the flat head and pull it out. 10p size are a bit difficult though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 06:35 pm:

Craftsman Cotter Pin Extractor. Stout enough to really get a grip and tap on the underside of the handle with a small hammer, but small enough to get in to the spots where the pins need removal.

You can barely make out "COTTER PIN EXTRACTOR" on the handle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 07:09 pm:

Is the eye always perfect? If a nail was used ? It could be a pin? If you want the job done no matter what,use a good pair of side cutters! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 07:15 pm:

Vice Grips or a small pin punch to straighten out the cotter pin prior to pulling it. On an old rusty one, I just move the cotter pin out of the road so I can get a socket on the nut and let the nut shear it off. I run a tap and rethreading die over the bolts/nuts and a drill through the cotter pin hole on all my bolts after I clean them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 07:15 pm:

I've used the one in RV's picture above for years.
or a needle nosed pliers if I can't find it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By gary hammond on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 07:44 pm:

I worked on cars and aircraft for a total of 45 years, a pair of side cutters, wire cutter, Dykes, whatever you wanna call 'em works better than anything, no need to straighten the ends on most old cotter pins, just grab 'em, dig in good and pull them out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 08:20 pm:

Meant 10d not 10p.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Shirley on Saturday, July 30, 2016 - 10:36 pm:

Just back the nut off, it will shear the pin surprisingly easy. Then just punch the pin half's out of the bolt. You'll lose the pin, but it sure beats the aggravation on messing with a pin you can't remove.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 11:29 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 11:32 am:

Just to add to the image above, I'm not suggesting that I just snip them off. I grab the head in the bottom of the jaws and rock the snipper over the nut. It pulls the pin out easily and sometimes you don't even need to straighten the ends out first.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 12:33 pm:

I pull the pins out with my teeth. Yep I just reach into the glass of water grab my teeth and get a hold of the pin and pull it out! When I'm done I just drop the teeth back into the water to let them soak some more. :-)


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