Exhaust pipe leak

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Exhaust pipe leak
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Hurt on Sunday, July 31, 2016 - 10:27 pm:

I installed my exhaust pipe so it fit all the way into the muffler. I did not put a muffler clamp onto the pipe going into the muffler as I had read (somewhere) not to as the pipe needed to flex with the car.

I have noticed that there is an exhaust leak where the pipe slides into the muffler. I noticed that it as my eyes were irritated after driving for a short time.

There is a slight gap between the pipe and the muffler pipe that slides over the pipe that comes back from the manifold.

Should I clamp the pipe in front of the muffler or leave it free to flex? What is the best solution to stop the exhaust leak?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Sunday, July 31, 2016 - 11:53 pm:

In my experience, if you clamp it, it becomes practically impossible to separate later


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 12:15 am:

You failed to mention the year of your car! In addition, NO stock T pipe uses a muffler clamp.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Luke----central TX. on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 12:24 am:

I replaced my exhaust pipe very recently and didn't replace the muffler. It had a clamp on it and I had no issues getting it off. I re-installed it with the clamp and have no problems that I know of (I have an open cab).

hope this Helps,

Luke


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 02:31 am:

If you're a "purist", the exhaust pipe just slips into the muffler, which attaches to the frame with one bolt thru' the mounting bracket at the rear of the stock muffler, and no clamp is used so that the slip joint can "flex".

If you are not a "purist", and wish to use a clamp where the exhaust pipe slips into the muffler, then do not mount the stock muffler to the frame with the one bolt, but use some type of flexible muffler hanger to allow for movement due to frame flex.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 06:22 am:

Brian, You have me intrigued. Cast iron muffler ends on earlier cars cannot be clamped. On later pressed metal mufflers, there is nowhere to put a clamp. We need to know just what you are dealing with. I suspect this is what is behind Larry's comment.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 08:15 am:

You can put a bead of RTV on the pipe before inserting it. No leaks, flexible.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 10:14 am:

The reason I had the original 20-27 exhaust pipes made, is because the current dealers don't care to supply the hobby with the correct pipes, which do not use clamps. I had a run of 50 of them made, and they all sold within four months, and were quite expensive @$89 plus shipping, which ran about half the cost of the pipe! But they did sell, and everyone that bought one is happy. I don't plan to have any more made in the future.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 10:32 am:

If you clamp it, you might find that the muffler comes apart while driving.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 10:43 am:

Maybe look elsewhere for a leak like at the joint between the pipe and manifold or manifold to block. While they do leak some at the muffler joint I would think that it's far enough back that the fumes would be carried back to rear. The exit on the muffler is only about 16 inches behind that joint.

After reflecting on how the later (pressed steel ends) muffler/tail pipe assembles were put together, they were one piece after put together I have changed my OP on the use of the clamp and now think it would be ok to use. The tail pipe ran all the way through the muffler on the original setup and everything was pulled together at the rear. The single mounting tab allowed the flex.

The cast iron type were mounted to the frame at both ends so the tail pipe had to be a slip fit to allow for expansion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 12:01 pm:

Larry's point is well taken.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 12:16 pm:

Although I have my pipe(s) from Larry's first (only?) production run, I am most disappointed that he plans no further production. I would hope that one of the "big players" would step up and either order enough from him (since he's already tooled up) or would have them made themselves. It is amazing how things go together when they are made correctly!
I also have the earlier pips he had made, and I will admit that I am surprised at the loose fit of the pipe to the cast front. Is Royce's idea of some RTV the answer there, or are we just more aware of exhaust gasses than they were "back in the day?"
OH, one more thought, and maybe there's a reason not to do it, but wouldn't using stainless tubing would make a rust-out-proof pipe? Then folks could wrap them for cooler floorboards etc. etc. I believe the tubing itself is not the big expense with these pipes, but the forming and welding (for the late pipes).
Just some morning thinking--Danger Will Robinson!! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 12:28 pm:

I am positive that the tiny amount of exhaust leaking underneath the rear of the car from the joint between the muffler and the pipe could not possibly cause eye irritation. I suspect an anxiety attack caused by seeing a tiny bit of soot around that joint is the real issue at hand.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Hurt on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 08:35 pm:

I just got back from an evening drive. The exhaust pipe came off from the manifold, so I suspect that is why I had the eye irritation!
I will try the RTV next to see if that helps.
The biggest problem I have to agree with is the pipe are just a size off and they should be made to a better tolerance for better fit.
Thanks for help!

Brian


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, August 01, 2016 - 10:05 pm:

Brian,
If you have one of the common "cheap" pipes sold by most of the dealers, it never will fit "just right"! Well, unless you "tweak" it some. Easy to tell which one you have; the bends are obvious, the pipe is indented on the inside of any curves. The originals are mandrel bent and the pipe is the same size all the way through.


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