1920 parts on a 26/27 frame

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: 1920 parts on a 26/27 frame
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Punter on Saturday, August 06, 2016 - 05:07 am:

My 1920 rolling chassis has a terrible sagging frame. I would like to transfer all the 20s parts on a very nice 26 frame.

Will it fit without drilling new holes ?
Same distance for all the brackets ?


Thanks in advance
Pat


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Punter on Saturday, August 06, 2016 - 05:14 am:

Forgot to say ...

I'm building a wood pickup. Body is not the problem. I'm more concerned about the front end parts.

Pat


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, August 06, 2016 - 05:30 am:

Pat, a 26-7 frame has a different front cross member to accept different front fender mounts. There will be problems there, but I don't know how difficult they may be to overcome.

The rest is likely to fit.

The 26-7 running board supports are also longer. On our Canadian sourced cars they have three holes for the running boards to bolt on. To fit the earlier, narrow boards, the supports will need to be cut back. That would not be difficult. It will leave just the two holes needed.

The rear cross member is also different, but that should pose no problems with a custom built body.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, August 06, 2016 - 05:44 am:

All the brackets for fastening the body are in different places on '26/'27 frames. The rear crossmember has a higher arc on the '26/'27 to lower the chassis an inch or so in the rear, might interfere with your wood body (I built my primitive pickup on a '25 frame just to avoid having to cut the bed floor for the crossmember hump, used mostly '26/'27 parts for the rest of the chassis)

Here's a drawing of a '26/'27 frame:
http://www.wescottsauto.com/WebCatalog/Tech/FrameDiagram1926-27.pdf

And here's John Regan's 1909-13 frame drawing that's valid for the basic measurements up through 1925:
http://www.funprojects.com/pdf/FPIframe.pdf


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Saturday, August 06, 2016 - 12:01 pm:

Don't do it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, August 06, 2016 - 12:15 pm:

Here's a thread about frame straightening:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/123360.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Saturday, August 06, 2016 - 09:37 pm:

You will find there are some Big differences around the steering box mounting area .I would either straighten frame or find a better one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, August 07, 2016 - 01:56 am:

I believe straightening your frame would be the simplest solution. it's not really that hard to do: some chains a hydraulic jack and a solid piece of iron (like railroad rail) or a big wooden beam. It's wise to put a piece of hardwood inside the frame rail where you are pushing/pulling.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, August 07, 2016 - 01:58 am:

I should have mentioned, the hardwood is to keep from bending the rail top & bottom in. Just need a short piece at the point of pressure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, August 07, 2016 - 06:51 pm:

Pat, by 'terrible', how much sag are you talking of? If you stretch a string from front to back you can measure the sag on top of the rail. The deeper the sag, the more difficult it would be to straighten.
In my experience, I have had to push on the rails until the taper on the bottom of the rail is almost straight, before the rail would hold its straight edge on top. With this much load I had to make two tight fitting timber spacers to go between the rails and then clamp the rails to them. Otherwise the rails wanted to bow and twist as the press load was applied. The results were entirely satisfactory, but the process was a little scary!

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Sunday, August 07, 2016 - 07:02 pm:

Where are you? I might be able to fix you up with a decent frame of about 21-23vintage.in other words it has holes for both style running board bracket. As pointed out, badly sagging frames are hard to straighten.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Pat Punter on Monday, August 08, 2016 - 06:15 am:

thanks for all the comments

I made some phone calls this week end and I traded a '23 engine block for an earlier frame. I could have drilled some new holes but the real deal breaker was the higher rear crossmember like Roger said.

Too bad for my straight as an arrow "improved frame" ...


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