Engine history?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Engine history?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Woods on Saturday, August 13, 2016 - 10:14 am:

Hello I am new to T's and recently picked up a '23 Touring. Unfortunately the seller having had the car for at least 30 years never even started it and knew very little of its history besides it sitting.

The car appears to have the original wires (what is left of them), the original rear panel on the top, the main top piece has been replaced but really don't see a lot of evidence that this car was really messed with a whole lot.

This winter I am planning to rewire, replace gas tank, lube car and basically go over timer, carb etc to get the car ready to start but wondered if there were any tell tale signs that the engine was rebuilt?

I did pull the inspection plate on bottom of oil pan to inspect for any metal, parts etc but so far everything looks good, car has compression and no rust in cylinders.

I did attach a photo of the crank looking through the inspection plate to see if anyone could tell if it looks like maybe the engine was serviced (maybe by the type of cotton pins) not sure. So if anyone has any ideas please let me know.

Thanks!

DavidCrank


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, August 13, 2016 - 10:43 am:

Let's see photos of the whole car.

Why wait until winter? If the car was running before it was put away and it has been kept in good storage, it shouldn't take much to get it running.

Clean the timer, clean and gap the plugs, put in some gas, oil and water, jack up the rear wheels, put the transmission in neutral or high and see if you can start the car.

If you need to, borrow a battery and a set of adjusted coils from someone in your area.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, August 13, 2016 - 10:53 am:

I think that after ninety years there are very few T's that have never had any engine work done. Are the pistons cast iron, or aluminum? Original cast iron doesn't prove that no engine work was done, but aluminum proves that it was.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, August 13, 2016 - 11:09 am:

Unless its an illusion from the motor oil, the nuts and bolts look like they have had wrenches on them (they look nicked up to me) so someone has been inside the engine before. Who knows if it was just tightening the bearings, an overhaul or a complete rebuild.

Also, looks like someone has hammered the ribs/flanges of the main bearing and rod caps.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Saturday, August 13, 2016 - 12:54 pm:

It may be the lighting, but it looks like you may have brass shims under the rod cap in the photo. This would be a good indicator that work has been done on this engine at some point. Doesn't mean much though. It may be fine as is, or need a complete rebuild.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, August 13, 2016 - 01:07 pm:

I saw that too; why would anyone hammer the main caps? I can sorta understand maybe the rods from getting a stuck piston out or ?????
Cotter pins do look like modern ones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Saturday, August 13, 2016 - 01:35 pm:

David, try this. Reach up in the engine and grab hold of the rod by the cap. Move it, or try to move it fore-and -aft on the crankpin. If it slops from side to side on the crankpin real easy, like with the finger tips the rod is loose and will likely knock. If it takes considerable effort to move the rod, it is probably OK. If you can not get it to slide back and forth with your hand, try tapping lightly on it with a light hammer. If that is what it takes to make the rod slide back and forth, that is ideal. Do this on all four rods with the crank turned to several different positions. Also, pull brake lever back so trans is in neutral if it is not already. Open hood on drivers side. Take prybar and put it between the crank pulley and the timing cover and pry forward on the pulley.How much endplay? Next, pull the inspection door off the transmission. DO NOT LEAVE THE SCREWS ANYWHERE NEAR THE OPEN HOLE!! Anything else. Take key out of switch and get it away. Then, take another picture of the pedal shafts/bands and post it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Saturday, August 13, 2016 - 01:48 pm:

David, the reason main and rod caps got hammered on was this. Back in the old days before modern tools, mechanic would 'scrape'bearings after filing caps to get the bearing area round instead of very slightly oblong from filing or removing shims. Scraping, being a hand operation would leave slight high and low spots. So, they would clamp the crank in a vice and pound the cap with a BFH, thus using the crank itself as a mandrel. Did it to rods, too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Saturday, August 13, 2016 - 01:50 pm:

Good advice Jim. David Woods; I like your planned and methodical sequence of events leading to an orderly " breathing the breath of life" back into your '23 touring. But before you do much driving, ensure the Babbitt thrust washers in the rear end have been correctly replaced with the bronze thrust washers. I just sold a '23 touring last week. It was my first T. They're kinda rare and transitional. Firewall is 3 ribbed and metal and mine had the only cast iron dash to steering column support Ive ever seen. Keep us posted on your progress and ......more pictures please!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Pawelek Brookshire, Texas on Saturday, August 13, 2016 - 02:02 pm:

How much compression dry and wet on each cylinder?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, August 13, 2016 - 02:05 pm:

RE: hammered caps

If you look at other motors, sometimes you see it to varying degrees. Don't know the reason for it.


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