I wonder how and why this happened

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: I wonder how and why this happened
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 01:33 pm:

I wonder why somebody would just tear a bolt out of an axle housing? Next I'm going to figure out how they got the Model A wheels on there


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 01:41 pm:

Some guys only have two tools, it seems - a torch and a sledge hammer..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 01:51 pm:

Many years ago when I regularly scoured the junkyards for old Mopar parts, I saw some real carnage from folks trying to remove parts without the patience or proper tools to do so. The staff were some of the biggest offenders, they would drive around in a junkyard car with two holes torched in the trunklid - one for the acetylene bottle, the other for the oxygen bottle.

You want that front spindle assembly? No problem!

:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 02:01 pm:

Corey,

I have seen wood wheel rear axle hubs that have had the Model A Wheel welded to the rear hub. It was put onto the car just like a non-demountable rear wheel. From your photo I cannot tell if the Model A hubcap is still on the wheel or not. If it is, and if it was crimped on the back side as it would have originally been done, then they most likely left the rear hub on the rear axle. And then they just welded the Model A Wheel to the hub. To remove the wheel, remove the hub cap, remove the cotter pin (and possibly the Model T hub cap!) and then the axle nut.

How they broke the bolt that holds the brake shoes, I cannot tell from that single photo. Perhaps some sort of accidental situation? Did the brake shoes lock up at high speed? Did a nut on one or more of the hub bolts back off and bind between the drum/brake shoes/and that bolt and cause it to shear? Perhaps after you remove the rear wheel/hub you will be able to see indications of what happened?

If the wheel is good -- I would sacrifice the hub and save the wheel. But if the wheel is in similar shape to the backing plate you have some good conversation pieces.....

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 02:18 pm:

Hap - You came close to what my first thought was,....possibly a rock got caught up in between a rotating member and a stationary member,....???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 02:25 pm:

It looks like they welded an A hub to the T hub so you can still get the wheel off with the lug nuts. The other side is missing the bolt too, but it's not cut . There are als some extra body bracketsout


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 02:26 pm:

I owned a pre-1960 wrecking yard back in the 80's, early 90's. For this exact reason, no one
was allowed to pull the parts except me. For a $10 part, these apes would destroy $500 worth
of saleable goods to get it loose "the easy way".

And boy, did I have a lot of whiners who could not understand my reasoning for keeping them
out of the yard. I think this was my real turning point regarding old car guys. Some are very
respectful and meticulous (historically oriented) and then there are the rest ... cheapskates, no-
goods, braggarts, and chest-pounding scum. All about the money, or the look-at-me angle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 02:29 pm:

Apparently this is a T chassis farm wagon? If that is all that has been cut/drilled/bolted on/bent,etc.it is a miracle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 02:43 pm:

It had a good motor on it when I bought it. 1921 cast date, no serial number, 4 dip pan, no ring gear on the flywheel. I took it apart cleaned it up, new rings on std Ford script pistons, I used it on a chassis I already had and it runs great. Crank was still perfect so I assume it was being driven before somebody took the body. It had a brass hub fan and a high head. A real mix up


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 03:06 pm:

After they welded on the flanges to mount the A wheels and after they had everything mounted they found the brake cam was in the way so they cut it out. Guess they thought it was easier then pulling the hubs back off and hack-sawing off the lever to remove the cam.

(Message edited by redmodelt on August 14, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 03:12 pm:

That's the brake shoe mounting bolt side.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 03:16 pm:

Model T's would usually end their days used as wagons, trailers and parts for other things on the farm.
Use to see quite a few in this area at farm auctions and junk sales. A Model T was a very usable vehicle right down to the very end!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 03:43 pm:

Jim you are right, duh on my part. Maybe the bolt was in the way or got hung up on something and got broke out, the backing plate is bent there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Sunday, August 14, 2016 - 04:05 pm:

You are probably right, Mark. And as stated above, T parts got used in all sorts of farm applications.The best prize of cobbled together wagon crap I ever dragged home was a Model A pickup bed. With a 6 rivet rear end under it.Ron Knepper, of Ft. Wayne wound up with it. I believe he sold that at Hershey. I wonder who got it, and if it made it under a car.


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