Old Photo - Model T Assembly Line, Body Meets Chassis

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Old Photo - Model T Assembly Line, Body Meets Chassis
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Monday, August 15, 2016 - 10:00 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Tuesday, August 16, 2016 - 06:08 am:

Jay,

Great photo. While it has been posted before, there are always new folks and others who have not seen it. And we often see something new when we look at them again.

Note the lower windshield pivots which indicates it is a Canadian assembly line. I wonder which one as they also had several assembly plants. The high cowl and splash apron under the radiator make it a 1924 - 1925 model year.

And the Kelsey removable lugs on the wheels make it a 1924 model year as the page from the 1926 Canadian Price List of Parts has the fixed lug style 30 x 3 1/2 inch rims listed for the 1925-26 years (ref the posting at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/599638/667909.html?1471305884 Aug 15, 2016 - 08:04 pm by Hap - 1926 page posted).

The photo is on page 111 of Robert C. Kreipke's book "Model T Ford" and is credited to Ford of Canada. They have it in the 1924 section, and based on the removable Kelsey wheel lugs I believe that is typical Canadian 1924. And of course when the change over to the fixed lugs on the rims came, there would have most likely been some overlap when one plant was using the new fixed lug wheels and another plant was still using up the loose lug wheels.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off

(Message edited by Hap_tucker on August 16, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, August 16, 2016 - 09:15 am:

Very nice descriptive photo of Fords factory.

What's noticeable is the assembly line drive unit on the factory floor.

There are several photos of Ford's machine shops and other shops where the machinery is being run by belts of all sizes with no belt guards in open areas.

This photo shows the assembly line drive unit with belt guards. The unit may be a chain drive instead of using belts but it does have guards over the rotating pullys. Interesting!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, August 16, 2016 - 09:30 am:

Hap

I believe this photo (you can find on eBay copies for sale) was listed earlier on eBay in a set of photos of the new then Ford assembly plant in Sweden. Plant photos aren't USA.

That would account for the up to date machinery and the T's are export type, like Canada, more feature, driver's door which didn't happen in the USA production until the new 1926 bodies.

I saved several of those photos to my file, here are some more Sweden factory views from late 1924.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, August 16, 2016 - 10:03 am:

Actually it's from the Danish Copenhagen plant, Dan :-)
Ford waited until 1931 to build an assembly plant in Sweden.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith, Lomita, California on Tuesday, August 16, 2016 - 10:48 am:

It's nice to see the correct two window placement in the first photo. There are so many cars I see on tours that are not correct.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Tuesday, August 16, 2016 - 09:09 pm:

Dan,

I'm 99% sure the first photo that Jay posted is a Canadian body. Rationale -- both the lower windshield and upper windshield of the slant windshield are hinged. To my knowledge -- only Ford of Canada did that.

Ford of Canada has exclusive rights to export to the British Commonwealth with the exception of England and Ireland.

So the top photo may have been a British Common wealth country for example New Zealand used their bodies and parts see the lower windshield hinge on the cars being assembled at the Wellington Plant in New Zealand in the photo from Gardner's "Ford Ahead" page 41:



But the cars in Jay's original posting are left hand drive. If they were for a British Commonwealth country they normally would be right hand drive. [Note England had USA management that made them go to left hand drive for a few years and that was not wise.]

The cars in the photos you posted I believe were British car parts being assembled in the Danish Copenhagen plant. If you look closely at the right hand axle of the touring you will see it has a Drop Frame axle. The Axle goes slightly up rather than down at the ends.



I suspect the person who was selling them on e-bay got one or more photos in the wrong stack. That is easy to do -- they all look very similar.

Thanks to everyone for their inputs!

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Tuesday, August 16, 2016 - 09:23 pm:

Could be the plant in the east end of Toronto. It opened in the early '20s and has a saw tooth roof with windows about that height. It's now a shopping mall. Just a guess.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Saturday, August 20, 2016 - 06:26 pm:

Larry, you are right on the window placement. When I bought my top from Elizabeth the windows were to close together. I provided her with factory pics to prove my point and she did send me a new one that was right.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, mostly in Dearborn on Saturday, August 20, 2016 - 06:51 pm:

Would not the presence of drivers side doors in the first photo also point to Canadian production?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, August 21, 2016 - 03:57 pm:

Tom,

Yes, having a driver’s door on the left hand side of the car is one characteristic of a Canadian 1912-1927 touring and runabout body. Those Canadian bodies with a left hand and right hand front door were exported to many other British Commonwealth countries as well as used in Canada. (Australia used them until the embargo/tariff of complete cars made them cost prohibitive and they switched to locally produced bodies around 1917; New Zealand; South Africa etc. continued to use the Canadian style bodies ).

But, a left hand functional door is also a characteristic of the 1912-1927 English touring and runabout bodies which were used in England and in some European Ford factories for example Denmark. Below is a 1918 English Ford touring showing the functional door on the left hand side:



Why do we think it is English and not Canadian? Note the combination horn and light switch – Canada did not use those. It also helps that it is on the RAF site at: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/listing/object-205009078 This was also discussed briefly on the forum at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/562000.html?1439342247

Below is a 1924 Drop Frame touring that belonged to Noel Pollard and it is from page 32 of the Jan-Feb 1984 “Vintage Ford” and used by permission to promote our club and hobby. Notice also that the rear door is notched to clear the rear fender. In this case we know it is not a Canadian car because of the notched rear door as well as the lower windshield that does not pivot out like the Canadian cars did. Also the article explaining it is an English Drop Frame car helps a lot.



So yes, a functional left hand front door could be a Canadian body but also an English body.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James L. Bodkin - Jim on Sunday, August 21, 2016 - 04:25 pm:

You guys are amazing!! How come nobody mentioned the mosquito resting on the belt guard on the assembly line drive. Also, it definitely looks like Canadian air in those tires. Let's not miss the small stuff!

Jim


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