Mounting tires on 21" Split rims

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Mounting tires on 21" Split rims
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Warren- Huntington, VT on Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 10:16 pm:

I have watched a few youtube videos on mounting the tires on the rims but thought I would check to see if anyone has any other tips for the best way to do it.

I have 4 brand new rims, I have new tubes, rim flaps, and tires.

I just painted the rims and plan to wait a few days for the paint to fully cure. Once the paint is nice and hard, what is the best way to mount the tires. I don't have the tool to collapse the rims. Should I buy one or are there other ways to mount them without it?

I have heard if you use the tool, you have to be really careful or else you can ruin the rim real quickly. Is there a particular way to use the tool that is likely to cause less of a chance of damaging the rim?

Thanks
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 10:26 pm:

Get a rim tool. Practice is what it takes to do this successfully. Based on what you have said and how you said it, I would see if anyone in your area that has Ts and experience can help you. It requires considerable finesse and in my case a fresh supply of profanity.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 10:28 pm:

I use the tool and don't have any issues. It could be possible to "collapse" the rim too far and bend, twist, cause it to go out of round.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 10:30 pm:

Yeah, finesse! Gentle and forceful with a delicate attitude.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 10:46 pm:

You also need the tool to un-collapse the rim after the tire is on. Tool works both ways. A turnbuckle with hooks installed will collapse the rim and a jack can be used to force the rim back into place so it can be latched.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 10:47 pm:

I, Too, use the tool and don't have any issues. That said, for someone who hasn't done it before, it does take a bit of learning.

Maybe there is someone in NH who's done it and can help so you get the hang of it.

To make it easier, I use a table about 3' square to lay the tire on so I'm not kneeling on the floor and can get all around the tire easily. Us old guys get sore backs easily, you know. :-)

Just go slowly and don't pull on the rim too much with the tool - go just enough to slide one part of the rim joint past the other, then use tire irons. I also use tire lube to make it easier.

Hope this helps.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 11:24 pm:

What do you guys think of Michael W. using flaps? Are they good now? I remember when they were huge thick things that would not fit inside the tire. I imagine this has changed. We lined the rims(rusty,sprung,oval shaped...) with duct tape. Cut a piece of old inner tube long enough to go from the valve stem to the split, with a hole for the valve stem to fit through.BUT,a good flap, if they make them now, is a better answer. And as was mentioned by Keith tire lube or talc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Wednesday, August 17, 2016 - 11:29 pm:

I had a miserable time mounting my 21" tires with the split rim spreader 8-10 years ago. I was mounting the inexpensive vinyl tires, Universal's and Lucas tires.

After I was done I had an out of round set of hard tires which lasted a long time but had poor traction, skidding in tight turns and with firm braking.

Last week I mounted up two polyester Firestone tires. They presented no problems. The rims went in easily and stayed round. No more bump, bump, bump and no more skids.

The other two wheels got two old vinyls remounted... lots of sweat and verbalization... same problems. I am looking forward to the demise of my two vinyl tires. I will NEVER buy another vinyl tire, the polyester tires are definitely worth double the cost of vinyl tires.

When I mount I use a squeeze bottle of hand soap on the bead. If you have Silglide that would be even better.

I do use flaps. They are thick but easily fit inside the tire. The issue is an undersize bead and profound lack of elasticity with the vinyl tires.

IMHO, TH


(Message edited by thorlick on August 17, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Barker, Somerset, England on Thursday, August 18, 2016 - 06:07 am:

May I suggest that before you fit the tyres, you lay a layer of duct tape in the rim well? Fold one end back on itself to form a flap which overlaps the joint. It can't do any harm, and it may stop a rough surface eventually puncturing the tube.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, August 18, 2016 - 06:58 am:

Michael has 21" split rims. They need flaps to save the tube from the split in the rim. Other types of rims may or may not need flaps, but for the 21" split there isn't any debate.

I haven't seen any of the split rim tools here in Sweden, so I use a turnbuckle of proper size. Still some hard work with certain tires, but it works :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell, Huntsville, AL on Thursday, August 18, 2016 - 08:35 am:

I do quite a bit of motorcycle work as well as have a T. I found it very easy to mount tire and tube with flap using my Coates 220 tire changer and tire bar. Then I just use the rim tool to expand the rim to set the latch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By ALAN FAIRCLOUGH from Houston, TEXAS on Thursday, August 18, 2016 - 01:37 pm:

I use the tool, I use duct tape around the rim and over the ends of the tool to avoid scratching the paint and also to help prevent the tool from slipping. I also use the tool to get the latch hole to go over the stub so i can get the retaining bolt in.
A bit of soapy water helps get the tire on.
inflate and deflate the tube three times before I inflate it to full pressure. Inflate it AFTER putting it on the wheel, just in case it pops open or changes shape before I mount it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Thursday, August 18, 2016 - 03:05 pm:

I take mine to the local, old fashioned, service station where they actually DO stuff.
They'd rather do clinchers than splits but at least they do it for me....... :-O


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Warren- Huntington, VT on Friday, August 19, 2016 - 09:06 pm:

Thanks everyone for your responses. I have a friend that works at the local motorcycle dealership who has helped me with a few of my T projects so far. He thinks that we may be able to use the tire machine at their shop with a few modifications to mount the tires fairly easily. I'll let you know how it goes.
Mike


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell, Huntsville, AL on Friday, August 19, 2016 - 09:54 pm:

Michael, If the shop has a power machine, be very careful. Regulating the amount you compress the rim is critical. You don't want to compress too much so that the rim distorts. With a manual machine it is easy to regulate, a power machine, not so much. Also with my manual machine I can do most of the mounting by hand, and just the last little bit has to be done with the bar.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, August 20, 2016 - 01:21 am:

The machine may help you mount the tire, but you still need something to expand it so it can be locked..
As I wrote, a turnbuckle between the two ears closest to the split would work nicely - and can be found fairly cheap locally.
My longer one works too, sometimes with the careful help of a jack..
Here's another thread with pictures and links to videos: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/557350.html?1437949615


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Alexander in Albion, Maine on Saturday, August 20, 2016 - 06:53 am:

I guess it is a good thing that I did not know beforehand how miserable it can be to mount tires on 21" split rims. New tires, tubes and flaps went on with no trouble. I used a turnbuckle to collapse the rims and a small hydraulic jack and two "half moon" shapes pieces of 2x6 to expand it back so I could lock them in place. Maybe Mr. Murphy was concentrating on someone else. The wheels go on my '25 roadster pick up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell, Huntsville, AL on Saturday, August 20, 2016 - 09:23 am:

Bill Alexander, That is a good technique if you don't have the rim tool.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Saturday, August 20, 2016 - 01:10 pm:

To dismount a tire, let the air out, and disconnect the lock mechanism. Using a tire iron or two, get the ends of the rim to slip by each other. You don't need a rim spreader (or a "rim bender" as I prefer to call them). Using two or three tire tools you can start taking the tire off of the rim. IF you do insist on using a rim spreader, the idea is NOT to pull the rim together so the tire falls off. Just be careful not to pinch the tube with your tire tools.

I do install flaps on split rims. The flap is installed inside the tire. You do not use rim liners on split rims. No duct tape in ANY style of rim. (I know it is rather off topic here.) Have you ever set a roll of duct tape in the sun? If you want a sticky gooey mess from hot duct tape in your tires/rims, go ahead. Tires generate heat from the friction of the road.

To install the rim in the tire, do the opposite of what you did taking it apart. Put the tire/rim flat on the ground after the rim is installed but the ends are not together. I use my feet to spread it. I'm not going to bend the rim out of shape by using my feet. If you need to, use an immobile object to set the tire against and push the rim in place with your feet.

That's my method anyway.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Saturday, August 20, 2016 - 01:28 pm:

As Roger Karlsson posted above, the main reason for using flaps in a split rim is to cover the seam and any protruding elements of of the latching mechanism where the two ends of the rim meet in order to prevent chafing and wearing holes in the tube in that area.

Don't know why anyone would recommend putting duct tape on a split rim. For one thing, how would you cover the seam after the tire was mounted?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Warren- Huntington, VT on Monday, August 22, 2016 - 08:27 pm:

Made a video of me mounting a new tire on a new split rim. It's not the best video, but one example of how to do it. I scratched the new paint on the rim...Couldn't really avoid it. If I had thought about it I would have put tape on the rim near the split to prevent the two halves from rubbing together. Hope you find the video useful if you have to mount a 21" tire.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvf2nZ6ciDk


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tt newbee on Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 02:50 am:

Michael, great video, thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A Bartsch on Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 10:22 am:

Nice job, Michael. I'd skip the soap/water step, the talc powder is plenty, esp with new tire, tube, flap, & rim. respectfully, jb


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