Mounting clincher tires on rims.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Mounting clincher tires on rims.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Saturday, August 20, 2016 - 06:26 pm:

Can anyone direct me to the location of the exact procedure described as follows?
I remember here on the forum in the past that the trick is to put the new tire over a mounted 15 inch modern tire with the air out of it. Then blow up the tire and in the process stretch the clincher tire.
can anyone help?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Saturday, August 20, 2016 - 06:50 pm:

scroll down to May 5th, 2010 by Allan Bennett in this thread:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/139369.html

Was that it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jesse L. Ashcraft on Sunday, August 21, 2016 - 12:54 pm:

Hi Ron - For new tires, I found Dan Treace's tutorial very helpful. The whole thing is here:

http://mtfci2002.modelt.org/projects/clincher_tire_mounting.htm

Leave the tires out in the sun until you need gloves to handle them. Also, I wear knee pads with a hard plastic shell to hold what I got.

Good luck.

(Message edited by jesselashcraft on August 21, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, August 21, 2016 - 03:07 pm:

Ron you should not need to stretch them unless you have either the black Firestone conventional tread tires or the Coker Excelsior brand black tires. Both of those are very hard rubber, tough to mount in any case.

Scroll down to where you see the guy sitting on a milk stool:
http://modelt.org/discus/messages/2/32845.html?1314150377


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R. S. Cruickshank on Sunday, August 21, 2016 - 07:23 pm:

I think everyone who has a T has had some tire difficulty once or twice. I found that I could use squeeze clamps as a third or fourth hand to hold the tire on the rim until I had the tire completely on the rim. There is nothing worse that chasing the tire around the rim several times. I also use small pieces of leather under the tire iron to avoid chips. Just my .02..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, August 21, 2016 - 08:04 pm:

I recently found a secret to getting four tires mounted in about 20 minutes. I take 'em to my local tire dealer 12 miles north of me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Sunday, August 21, 2016 - 11:32 pm:

It's a little difficult to describe a procedure that involves a "knack." _The knack of peeling tires off a rim and levering them back on is something I learned as a kid and practiced every time I got a flat on my Schwinn.

But here are some generalities:

First, you need the right tools. _These include corn starch (because breathing talcum powder is unhealthy), two or three giant C-clamps, a pair of short tire irons, a big, heavy, dead-blow, rubber mallet, an electric tire pump and the Sun.

I've heard horror stories of old, hardened clinchers (particularly Ward's Riversides) that were so stubborn to remove, they had to be sawn off. _I've had to peel off old Riversides and yes, they were hard as oak, but Archimedes knew a thing or two about leverage and screws, and the principle works beautifully in the form of two or three big ol' C-clamps.

They're geared down low enough that you'll only get a 16th of an inch of movement per half-twist, but brother, their mechanical advantage is irresistible. _The bead will break.

There once was a kind, elderly couple who manufactured and marketed their own design of tire irons especially for the Ford Model T.



Unfortunately, the phone number they had stamped into their irons no longer goes through, so I suppose the best that can be done now is to try to find a set of irons that approximates their shape and size. _They measure out at 9 7/8".

If the tire irons you purchase have any square corners or are anything but dead smooth, take a file and then some emery cloth to them.

While we're talking abrasives; do make sure your rim is smooth, with no sharp edges anywhere. _When my tires came off the first time, the inside of the rims were a rusty mess. _They needed the rust wire-brushed off, emery papered, primed and painted. _I also applied two layers of duct-tape to the inside of the rim. _Some folks look askance at using duct-tape that way, but it's a time-tested way of doing this.

The name of this game is don't puncture the inner-tube, and the more you use the rubber mallet and C-clamps instead of the tire irons, the fewer opportunities there will be for puncturing your inner-tube.

Prep-work includes letting your replacement tire sit in the hot Sun long enough to soften the rubber, and lubing up the inner-tube and tire clinchers with corn starch. _Some folks use dishwashing liquid as a lubricant, but that's horribly messy. _I'd much rather sweep up corn starch than mop up dishwashing soap. _It's easiest to reinstall a tube that is slightly inflated. _You only want enough air in there to take out the limpness and just barely give it shape.

I found it easy to mount and dismount tires on the front of the car, but not the rear, so when dealing with a rear tire, I take the wheel off the car (With pre-1915 Model T's, this may be less of a problem because the fender doesn't wrap around the back). _If you're going to take the back wheel off the car, you're obviously going to need a wheel-puller (and every Model T owner should have one). _The new Model T wheel-pullers made overseas are not very good, so try to get an old, made-in-USA puller. _If your wheel has a Rocky Mountain brake drum, getting the wheel back on the car can be a bit of a challenge, but if you have a friend there to maneuver the brake band around the drum while you're pushing the wheel back onto the axle, it's very straightforward.

Flaps are great if you have the patience and room in the tire to accommodate them. _When mounting Firestone NON-SKIDs up front, I made an attempt at squeezing a flap in there, but came to the conclusion that there just wasn't sufficient room in the tire. _All four of my tires ran just fine without flaps until they wore out. _Some guys swear by flaps and insist they're necessary, others say they're not. _I'm sort of in the middle ground where that's concerned. _If you can manage to wrestle flaps into your tires and get the whole shebang mounted that way; great. _If not...well, Ford never bothered with 'em and I guess it worked out okay.

Inflation is important, particularly with rear tires because they are subjected to the kind of acceleration and braking forces that can cause a loose tire and tube to slip on the rim and shear off the air valve. _Minimum inflation pressure is 55 psi for front clinchers and 60 for rears.


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