1934 Ford in a dumpster

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: 1934 Ford in a dumpster
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Friday, August 26, 2016 - 10:38 pm:

Actually, a Bagster "Dumpster in a Bag."

My buddy needs more room so he is throwing out his '34 coupe.

He just needs to flip it over and set it on the curb.

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Shawn Hayward on Friday, August 26, 2016 - 10:49 pm:

If that's going in the dumpster,..I'm on my way to get it


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Friday, August 26, 2016 - 11:17 pm:

About 25 years ago I was setting my garbage out by the curb and noticed the lady up the street had her recently deceased husbands John Deer garden tractor and all the equipment lined up along the driveway. Snowblower, snowplow, garden tiller, and probably more. Tractor had the canvas cab. I doubt if the stuff was more than three or for years old. I had just bought the house, and had just got the business going OK. And I had a retired guy taking care of the grass and so I did not need it and couldn't afford it if I did. So I went to work. Got home that evening and it was all gone. My neighbor, a fuss-budget retired high-up minister from some rich denomination,headed my way. Before I could start any small talk, he told me in some language that I had doubted he knew that she had called the crusher truck that picked up large appliances for a fee and the claw had picked the stuff up and smashed it. Unbelievable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, August 27, 2016 - 12:51 am:

I worked on a 34 5 window that was bought new with the 4 cylinder engine and still had it installed. I think it came out of Canada. :-) My OP, one of the better looking mid 30's Fords.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Saturday, August 27, 2016 - 09:35 am:

I have a '35 Cabriolet it can sit next to. I believe I would have to find a deck lid for it but I'd get it off those scooters and drive that one.

Those are fun cars but unlike my T's, folks sort of look at you out of the corner of their eye when you go by. I've had my V8 for forty years but I'm really very flexible about it. She can sell it after the funeral.

Another plus is anytime I feel a T "go fast" attack coming on, I just drive that old Ford at 60 mph and it has gone away. At least it has 4-wheel brakes and a gas gauge!

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John P. Steele on Saturday, August 27, 2016 - 12:09 pm:


My 33 is sitting in my garage with a cracked head. Finally found one that will work but it's not a 33 head.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jeff cordes on Saturday, August 27, 2016 - 12:47 pm:

I got my 36 for free off the scrap pile.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John P. Steele on Saturday, August 27, 2016 - 01:13 pm:

Jeff, Is that picture at the Wendover Nugget?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jeff cordes on Saturday, August 27, 2016 - 02:46 pm:

Yes it is, I was at Speedweek a couple of weeks ago. The team I am crew chief for stays there every year. I didn't want to take too good a car for a run around vehicle so I took my worst one.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Saturday, August 27, 2016 - 02:56 pm:

All '34 vehicles with the four cylinder were built in late '33.
Ford sent the model a dies and .model B engine stuff to Russia at the end of '33 to build model A and AA with the four cylinder B engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Saturday, August 27, 2016 - 02:59 pm:

I like the 34s. I've been chasing a 32 three window that's been off the road and in a garage since the 50s. The family is not ready to let it go yet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jeff cordes on Saturday, August 27, 2016 - 04:28 pm:

I wouldn't mind adding a 33-4 to my collection. I just like the lines in those years. I never have been a duece fan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Saturday, August 27, 2016 - 05:42 pm:

Jeff that sure looks like a ghost that escaped from another time. 36 is my favorite early V8, here's mine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, August 27, 2016 - 07:12 pm:

Dan - Talk about a nice solid car;.....what a beauty! Would that have roll-up glass in the doors or side curtains? And would it be called a roadster? You've obviously got something on it to preserve the "patina" (....love that kinda' talk, right?) and if so, would that be some sort of satin finish clear coat or that boiled linseed oil concoction? Also, I've never been a fan of those mid-'30's artillery wheels, but with those hub caps and trim rings and the whitewall 6:00 x 16's (or are they a bit oversize?) those are really nice looking wheels. I'm sure I've bought a lot of cars in the past for considerably less than you've got invested in those tires & wheels!

Great car and great picture,.......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Saturday, August 27, 2016 - 10:15 pm:

Jeff, wouldn't mind hearing your story on how you got the car. Looks really neat!

Harold, where do i start? When I bought this car, it was just a basic body and chassis. There was no nose, windshield, fenders, rumble lid, etc..Street rodders had it. I had to put it back to mechanical brakes from the hydraulics they put on it. I had to repair the frame from that and from the chevy engine. Of course it now has the correct 21 stud flat head in it. Through the years I collected all the correct parts for it. Then the 75 anniversary of the 36 was going to be celebrated by the National Ford V-8 Club. I was not going to have time to restore the car, but I wanted to take it to National meet. I took the rumble lid, fenders and nose and painted it to match the body and doors. So, no it does not have clear coat or anything else on it. It all blended in pretty good. I tricked out the interior so that it looked appropriate to how it looked on the outside. Even putting wear spots where they should be. When we took it to the National meet, parked next to the restored Roadsters, everyone was going crazy over ours (yes it is a Roadster, side curtains, no roll up windows), telling me never to restore it, that there only original once. I ended up telling them what I did. As far as the wheels and tires, they are the correct size and the wheel covers were a genuine Ford accessory, which were available through 36-39, with slight variations. Trim rings were also available as an accessory. Although the ones I have on it are the later rib style, which I like better. I also used 37 ribbed door handles on it to match them


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 12:12 am:

About 20 years ago my boss had a friend who had this 36 Trunk-back Convertible Sedan that he bought in 37, had the top chopped and Carson made a top for it (reportedly his 4th top) painted the grill bars black and added all the pines accessory grill and fend trim. Unfortunately it sat in one his open barns for decades, the kids played in it, as did the grandkids; by the time he brought it to our shop the floor was swiss cheese. Had a great metal guy who made a frame around the body,then lifted it off and put a new floor in it (used a repro sedan floor and modified it to match the original floor). We got it back together enough to drive it their 50th wedding anniversary (I think they drove the car to their wedding). Unfortunately he did before it was finished, and the family fought over the restoration bill and then it went back to the barn. I have no idea where it is now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 12:44 am:

WOW! That certainly does not look like a "put-together" from collected parts car Dan! You must have the patience of Job! And what a great story! Thanks for taking the time to explain how you built a barn find "replica" I guess you might say. Sure had me fooled, but from your story of how you gradually collected and assembled that car, it sounds like you've fooled a lot of people! I sure hope you can instill a lot of your patience, skill and love for old Fords in that grandson of yours, and his little brother too! I know from previous posts that you've got a pretty good start on that one though. I always enjoy your posts Dan, and as much as I enjoy seeing your great photos of all those great Fords & Merc's, it's even better when "the boy" and his brother are included! Thanks Dan,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett, Spalding United Kingdom on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 01:55 pm:

How many of us have a V8 as well as a T?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 07:56 pm:

Harold, thanks for your kind words. Actually, it is a lot less demanding doing the car like this, rather than restoring it. That equals a lot less time. I should mention that this car itself is a great performer, if fits like a glove when you're driving it. Even though it is a flathead V-8 it only has 221 cubic inches. It's light weight and gearing, makes it seem like a lot larger engine in it. It's Ellen's favorite car next to the T's.
Glad you enjoy the pictures of our grandsons. Here is a picture of both of them on the 2016 Tour that Ellen and I hosted. They are in the 20 with Zuzu from the movie "It's a Wonderful Life", complete with the goat as in the movie.





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Monday, August 29, 2016 - 01:36 am:

I likes the '33-'34 Ford V8s too. Our '33 Std. Fordor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Dugger on Monday, August 29, 2016 - 02:24 am:

Verne: I had a 34 4 dr and was home for the weekend from
Ft Leonard Wood, Army Basic. I went to see a girl friend and punched a rod thru the left side of the block. It was towed to my Grandma's house and that was the last I ever saw it. Would give my interest in HEL* for the car today.
It would be a great car to restore. It was complete and original. Would have been nice to have had "JUICE BREAKS>.
Well hind sight. Of course that was 65 years ago
and it probably went to the crusher or grinder.
If you watch the program "The American Picker's", well I was working at J.I. Case Co. in Bettendorf , Iowa and one of the guys I worked with had this car. I paid him %%0.00 for it.
Oh, well that is hind sight and old history!!!!!!!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Monday, August 29, 2016 - 09:18 am:

Bill,
As a kid growing up in the car hobby, I remember when Model A's were "used cars". Anything built after the Model A was treated with the respect that a used up late 90's Toyota is today. Sedans and coupes from the late teens thru the 1930's were just junk. You wanted an "open" car. The only thing worth taking home was a true classic car such as a Delahye, Issota Fraschini, Duesenberg, Rolls, or Bentley. Even then, they were only bringing $3.5 to 5K or so. We didn't even consider collecting a brand new vehicle. I collected many parts for my '34 Ford Tudor in the 1970s and 80s. Now, even the parts are hard to come by. They have got to be around but people are apparently hoarding them. How times have changed!

By the way, my dad took his basic training at Ft. Leonard Wood, but that was for WWII.
Verne


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jeff cordes on Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 01:29 am:

Dan, I saw your car and collection at the MTFCI Auburn tour. I was very impressed as I saw a lot of similarities in our collections. Your roadster is an ideal cruiser. I have a lot more fun building and driving a car with character.


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