OT Gooseneck Trailer vs Bumper Pull

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: OT Gooseneck Trailer vs Bumper Pull
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Memmelaar Jr on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 11:35 am:

I Have been towing for many years, always bumper pull. I had a Transport designs 20' trailer for a long time, then bought a new to me Doolittle 28' which is a nice length to fit a my Model T plus my 1914 cadillac.

Both are heavy trailers in comparison to my fathers 1994 Featherlite which I borrow occasionally.

MY family and I have been touring further away from home, we are from NJ, and we have been going to Colorado, Kansas, and now possibly Montana. in my last trip I took the Doolittle, and got miserable mileage with my Ford F-350 Diesel 8.0-8.5mpg. With the small 25 gallon tank I was stopping for fuel way too much

I Want to make a sensible upgrade and I am looking at gooseneck trailers. I understand that they tow nicer, but is there any mileage advantage to a gooseneck of the same weight trailer? Any disadvantages of a gooseneck that I may be overlooking?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 12:47 pm:

I would put a 100 gal transfer tank in to make the truck ride better,and the extra range will let you price shop for fuel.Getting that kind of millage with a Diesel tell's me two things! Something is wrong with the truck or you need to lift your foot!! Myself,i don't think much of gooseneck hitches!! You in many states can not haul another trailer behind them and you have to have safty chains! I like a 5'th wheel hitch because 11,337 549 trucks can't be wrong and never let the tail wag the dog! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 12:49 pm:

The disadvantage of the gooseneck is losing the ability to use the bed of your pickup.

The gooseneck has the advantage of better weight distribution, and easier maneuvering while backing.

I doubt there is any mileage difference. I have a 22 foot hitch pull trailer that is magnificent for the job. I get about 14 MPG with my Dodge 2500 diesel when towing the trailer. Mine is a 2WD version, if I had the four wheel drive version it would get less mileage due to more weight and worse aerodynamics.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 01:19 pm:

8mpg from a diesel sounds worse than normal. I get 8mpg with gas engine towing a 26' enclosed with extra foot height as long as I don't go over 65mph. At 70 it drops to 7, and over 75 I get 6! It didn't take long to figure out the added fuel stops negates any time saved by driving faster.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 01:41 pm:

I love goose neck when I finish with the trailer I lower the "Hidden" ball and have my bed back with no obstruction. another advantage of the gooseneck is the ability to turn greater than 90 degrees without denting anything (comes in real handy if you live on a 2 lane road and have a 30 ft trailer. I will get another Goose neck (last one was demolished by a 70 foot pine tree after a storm) and I am rebuilding my 7.3 l PSD. as far as mileage you need to have your injectors serviced or find out which brake on your trailer is dragging. JMHO :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Adkisson on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 02:09 pm:

To talk mileage without the consideration of wind which I have found to be the biggest factor on mileage is foolish. I always thought Iowa to be flat, but it is a long windy incline and my mileage sucked...got better mileage in the mountains with the down hill coast


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Greg Adkisson on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 02:13 pm:

Pulled both 5th wheel at 37 feet and my car hauler at 26 feet behind an F350 crew cab long box...if I had to pick one it would be impossible. like the handling of the 5th wheel on the road but for me the bumper pull is easier to backup...for me that is


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Memmelaar Jr on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 03:11 pm:

I do have a heavy foot when it comes to running along. Once the turbo kicks in it gets ugly. That's why the poor mileage. I am Thinking about a bubble on the front of the trailer to help out, they promise a mile to the gallon better.


The ford that I have has a ton of torque and is comfortable on long runs. I am Looking for a little better mileage. Also be aware that between the two cars inside, cadillac weighs 4400 lbs and he 12 t adds some also. Not a
Light load by any means.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 04:23 pm:

Well if you have 6,000 in cars and at least 4,000 with the trailer i would switch to 5'th wheel before the tail wags the dog!We used to have a 27' 5'th wheel and hauled our 18' enclosed with the T in it in back of that!! Never a problem except i was slow at backing up!! The Wife wanted a larger RV so now we are up to 37'also and now we can't haul double.Bud Sometimes in Wheeler.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Doolittle on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 04:45 pm:

I have a truck similar to yours. I also pull a 35ft 5th wheel camper as well as a gooseneck Haulmark car hauler for touring. Both tow great.

Now here's your problem, as I see it. Your truck appears to have the short 6 1/2 ft bed, as most 4 door pick ups have these days. Mine has it, too. The camper industry has modified their campers to have rounded nose cones which allows full turning radius while the utility trailer industry has not adjusted and their trailers still have square cornered nose cones. Make a moderately hard turn and the back corner of your cab gets crushed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Howard ( Australia) on Sunday, August 28, 2016 - 04:58 pm:

I built my 5th wheel to go on my Isuzu D Max. Rides great, with the Hayman Reece R16 turntable hitch is just like a small semi. When I set it up , I placed the axle group so that with the full 3 ton gross there was about a quarter to third ton down-load on the back axle of the truck, which is smooth and still leaves some loading weight in the bed if needed. Wouldn't go back to a rear end hitch if there is a choice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gustaf in Idaho on Monday, August 29, 2016 - 01:16 pm:

Kenneth brings up a good point, goose neck trailers do not have any adverse effect on the handling of a pickup like a bumper pull trailer does. All you have to do is load a little too far back on a bumper pull trailer and find out how fast you can loose everything when it starts to oscillate.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve in Tennessee on Monday, August 29, 2016 - 10:22 pm:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3sHmDxwZlXQ


The goose neck is just SO maneuverable.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Monday, August 29, 2016 - 10:34 pm:

My old F250 supercab superduty with big rubber and heavy springs makes 8-9 loaded or empty with a 24 foot hitch pull trailer. I have a gooseneck ball in the bed but never use it for anything but the horse trailer. Horse trailer came like that. My Dodge 1500 quad cab had as much power as the 460 but it didn't like pulling that trailer. Too short. Too light sprung.

I just pulled a single axle trailer to Billings and back Friday with my 2007 Sport Trac. 75-85 on the freeway with a little Ferguson 30 tractor on it coming back. 17.6 going down 250 miles at about 80 most of the way. About 14 MPG loaded and you never know it is back there. No wonder it rides so rough empty. It has the 7,000 lb towing package and the 4.6 292 hp V8.

One of the things that really affects mileage with a trailer is what tires you are running and how much air you are running. I put new trailer tires on my 24 ft flatbed instead of more takes off's from the F250 and it made a world of difference. Handles better, pulls easier and the mileage went up a little. Put a set of trailer tires on this little trailer and had the wheels lined, made a whole chingo of difference in how it pulled.

The tire guy put 80 psi in the big trailer tires and 70 in the small trailer tires. He said it stops them from heating and it stops the sway. He was right. I'm smarter than I was before.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kirk Peterson on Monday, August 29, 2016 - 10:41 pm:

Stan

What size is a big trailer tire versus the size of a small trailer tire?

Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Monday, August 29, 2016 - 11:16 pm:

The tandem axle is 265/75/16 I think and the small single axle trailer is 15 inch, they are pretty narrow, I'm thinking 215/85/15. They both have tall sidewalls.

The bigger tires are HI-RUN made in China. I complained about it and they told me that cannot get any trailer specific tires made in the US. The smaller ones are China and I don't know the brand.

I bought the dealer, not the tires on these tires. I put a new set of Hankook Optimas on both of my Sport Tracs, new tires on the small trailer and a set of new trailer tires on a balewagon I sold that was going to Walla Walla all on the same day. Expensive day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Monday, August 29, 2016 - 11:35 pm:

Our F350 gets 9-9.5 pulling our 32 ft bumper hitch, usually with two cars. The trailer is an extra foot and a half taller too. I usually drive 70 mph on interstate, and usually in light hills across IA, Il, etc to MN, MI and PA (New London to New Brighton MN, Dearborn and Hershey).

I've used 5th wheel trailers and like them, but our bumper hitch is easy for hook up, etc.

Sometimes I use our F-250 and get the same mileage loaded, bit better mileage without the trailer. I like the 350 better (du ally, better spring package and longer wheelbase) but the 250 works ok, just not as forgiving if I don't load right to keep enough weight on the pickup (hopefully without putting the front end up in the air).

My 2 cents


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kirk Peterson on Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 12:48 pm:

Thanks Stan for the tire information. Managing trailer tire life requires a bit of effort unless you don't mind changing tires on the road.

This next statement belongs in another thread but it is about the good life.

I'm grateful for my Nebraska roots.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 09:11 pm:

My 7.3 ford 3/4 ton gets 13 running at 70 pulling a fifth wheel camper 26'. Nice to pull but you've got to watch your hard corners. They don't follow as close as the ball hitch. Still have a lot of bed you can use.


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