Photo - Logging with 20 Horsepower

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Photo - Logging with 20 Horsepower
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Lance Sorenson, Hector, Minnesota on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 01:59 pm:

Wilton is now considered a bedroom community of Bemidji, Mn. I was surprised to see the number of TT's pulling fifth-wheel trailers. It must have been a hard pull getting out of the woods with 20 H.P.



Another T with a smaller load.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Niedzielski on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 02:18 pm:

I would guess that a commercial operation such as this would have had their TT's outfitted with overhead valve conversions, such as a Rajo 4 -valve and especially an 8 valve C-35 which was a sturdy commercial head.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 02:30 pm:

Bet those TT trucks had a short life with that much weight and hard usage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 02:32 pm:

My grandpa was hauling logs with a TT in central Florida in the late 20s when a few A model trucks were showing up. The TTs had two-speed axles and Warford transmissions and were so slow you could barely see them moving but they'd keep going while the A's would stall out because of less effective gearing. Grandpa never mentioned souped up engines but they may have such, I don't know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 04:36 pm:

I bet Robert is correct. Adding a little horsepower would not be as effective as gearing them down. Remember, the guys driving the trucks in these photos were only a short time earlier using a team of horses, mules or oxen. They may seem slow to us, but those guys could get a whole lot more done with those slow trucks than they ever could with a team.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael R Beary on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 07:45 pm:

The logs are short. Wonder what that length was used for? Firewood-wooden boxes-pallets?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 07:49 pm:

Pulp wood, and the one load that's finished are maybe railroad ties, be my guess. Dave in Bellingham, WA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 10:53 pm:

Saw logs for lumber and pulpwood for paper were cut at 100". At 100" you can trim to 8'. As the truck beds were set up for saw logs pulpwood followed. And, 100" logs fit nice crosswise in a railroad car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 10:57 pm:

I agree, the cants in the bottom photo are likely railroad ties. Though Dad got a contract for ties one year they were saw logs that went to the mill to be cut and treated. As I recall they were 100" too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 11:00 pm:

If those trucks were 16' beds and the logs were load between 36" to 48" your looking at 3-4 cord per truck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 12:03 am:

My TT runs the low, 7:1 gears. With Ruckstell, it can gear down even lower. It could
probably climb cliffs and trees, if not for falling over backwards.

A comfortable top speed, and by "comfortable" I mean the drivetrain isn't trying to
shake itself apart, is about 15mph. It will break 20 if pushed, but it seems hard on the
old dog.

But to the point, for those who have ridden horses, a typical quarter horse does a
strong gallop at about 20-25 mph and can sustain it for a quarter mile or so before
"pooping out". Plodding along as part of a drayage team, speeds were well under ten
mph.

As I drive my TT around in traffic, I constantly feel the "push" of the cars around me
to go faster. But when I am out on some back road by myself, 15 feels pretty good
and watching the grass and trees go by, I think back on riding our horses and realize
just how much faster I am moving.

As slow as they may seem today, they must have felt like "rocket ships" back in their
day. Oh yeah, .... rocket ships were still decades away ! I guess they must have felt
like they were going amazingly fast !!! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale L Myers on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 06:13 am:

What did the snail say when riding on the back of a turtle?


Whee!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale L Myers on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 07:33 am:

Don't get me wrong,if I had garage space I would have a TT.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 07:38 am:

I have never seen railroad ties with all that lean on them,and a good horse will make 40mph.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 09:36 am:

You miss the point. A good horse may make 40 mph for a short distance with NO log load in tow.
A TT will haul 40 loads of logs from the woods to the mill all day long. What even a very basic truck
like a TT could do was revolutionary in its day. We have become so fast paced that this escapes
most people now.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 10:01 am:

Good point. These days going down the road has to be at least 60mph has to be the speed range on regularly used roadways. Most T cars were driven around 20-30 mph and a T Truck was half that speed way back when. A different time to be sure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 11:05 am:

If anyone is going to haul 40 loads of logs to the mill in a day you need to be very close to the mill and have a very quick way to load and unload!! What did i miss?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, September 02, 2016 - 01:00 am:

Pretty simple, really .... drive an empty trailer into the woods, trade it
out for a loaded one, take it to the mill, and swap it out for an empty !

But again, we're getting lost in hypotheticals ..... the TT was a rocket
and could go all day long when compared to horse teams.


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