WHAT TYPE OF LIGHTS ARE THESE English & Mersick

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: WHAT TYPE OF LIGHTS ARE THESE English & Mersick
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Phil Heimerl on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 05:46 pm:

HI Guys,

I am not a car collector although I appreciate their history very much. I am an antique collector and these car lights spoke to me so I bought them. But I can't find any info on them. I would like to know what type of vehicle they came off and maybe a value. They have been electrified by previous owner. Any help would be greatly appreciated. They each have a red jewel on the backside. Inside on the silver lining it reads The English and Mersick Co. New Haven, Conn. Thank you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 06:05 pm:

Almost certainly carriage/sleigh lights. They probably used a candle.Don't recall ever running into to that brand. New a guy that collected sleighs. Dead. What differentiates a buggy/carriage light from a sleigh light I forget, but according to him there could be a difference.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Phil Heimerl on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 06:28 pm:

Thanks Jim. Any more info from anyone else would be greatly appreciated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 08:07 pm:

English & Mersick manufactured trimmings and hardware for carriages including carriage lamps. In the early 1900s, they also manufactured oil, acetylene and electric lamps for automobiles.

My dad has an early electric car so I have seen more than my fair share of electric automobile lamps including English & Mersick.

The finials at the bottom of the lamps are too short compared to the typical candle holder style carriage lamp.

Those lamps probably started out as electric automobile lamps. The only upgrade would have been someone installing a modern socket and converting them to 110 volts to hang them as decorations.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 09:02 pm:

Erik, I defer to your superior knowledge. I thought about the short finial, too, being too short for a candle. That is what jogged my memory about a species-specfic sleigh light. There was an amazing variety of lanterns/lights.Around the turn of the century(i love saying that) I got seller and buyer together on what we all thought was a very early locomotive headlight. Turns out it was from a canal boat. No one was dissapointed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 09:06 pm:

Here is a pair of English & Mersick lamps that my father has for sale.

This is one of the styles used on electric cars. This style of lamp was sometimes used on larger/expensive gasoline powered enclosed cars, such as high on on the door posts of sedans. They were also used on hearses.

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Phil Heimerl on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 09:29 pm:

HI Eric,

I am a little confused. So you believe my lamps are from an electric automobile? You said my finials at bottom of lamps were too short, but when I look at the pic you posted, it appears my finials are longer than yours? Sorry - just a little confused. Can you clarify? Thank you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, September 01, 2016 - 10:26 pm:

Lamps came if various styles.

Note that the sockets in my lamps mount from the top. Also, the spun metal around the sockets is quite long.

Your sockets are at the bottom of the lamp but the spun metal around the sockets is short because the socket sits further down inside the lamp.

Also, the tube where the wire comes out of your lamp looks original to the lamp. When I have seen carriage or car lamps that have been electrified at a later date, a hole is usually just drilled wherever it is convenient.

Candle powered carriage lamps usually have very long plain stem on the bottom to hold the candle. As the candle gets shorter with use, you are required to push the candle back up into the lamp in the proper position. Some candle lamps have a spring loaded mechanism in the candle holder so all you have to do is push up on the bottom of the stem to get the candle back up to the proper position.

Oil or candle lamps need good ventilation in order to burn - air intake and exhaust. I just don't see that with your lamps, unless details are hidden in the photo.

I would have to look at your lamps in person to make a better determination but, based on what I see, in my opinion they are automobile lamps from an electric car.

You could try removing the bottom finials and see if there is evidence of a candle holder or if the finials were originally kerosene reservoirs.

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Below are photos of the plain-Jane cyclops lamp on my dad's 1900 Waverley Electric.

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Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Phil Heimerl on Friday, September 02, 2016 - 10:39 am:

Nice photos. Thank you much.


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