Another VanDerBink auction with T stuff this weekend

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Another VanDerBink auction with T stuff this weekend
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Beatty _Kansas City on Thursday, September 08, 2016 - 11:36 am:

There is a big car and parts auction in Hildreth Ne this weekend.

The complete listing and pictures can be found here:
http://www.vanderbrinkauctions.com/auctions_details.php?detail=200&allimages=NO

And here is a list of the T related stuff:

A Large Collection of Ford Model T Cars/Trucks/Pickups, Parts, Bodies, Frames, Wheels, Fenders, etc … a 1916 Ford Roadster, 1917 Touring Car, 16-17 Roadster Body Panels, Doors, Top Assemblies, Numbered Engines, Fenders, Windshield Frames. Tons of 1917-1925 T Sheetmetal Parts: Bodies, Frames, Front & Rear Fenders, Hoods, Decklids, Convertible Top Bows, windshield Frames, Gas Tanks, Steering Columns, Wooden Wheels, T-Wire Wheels, (4-5) 1917-1922 T Touring Cars, 1924 T Fuel Truck, 1926 Pickup, 23-25 Converted Pickup (rolling), T Dump Box, T –Ford Script Flatbeds, T Pickup Boxes & Tail Gates, (2) C-Cab Truck Bodies, 1925 Ford T Coupe, Early T Roadster Cowls, Doors & Body Panels, (3-4) 26-27 T Roadster Cars & Roadster Pickup Rolling Projects, (3-4) 26-27 Coupe Bodies, 26-27 Rolling Chassis with lots of extra Fenders, Runningboards, Splash Aprons, (4-5) 26-27 T Touring Cars with extra Body Parts, Roadster Doors, Fenders, Top Assemblies, 26-27 Wire Wheels & Hubs, (3) 1926 Model T Sedans with extra Frames, Doors, Radiator shells, Hoods, fenders (front & Rear), Tail lights, Head Lights, etc


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, September 08, 2016 - 01:48 pm:

Unreal! Would love to go there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Thursday, September 08, 2016 - 02:45 pm:

If you go to a Vanderbrink auction make sure you take somebody with you if you are interested in several things. She will suddenly decide to start a second ring clear to hell and gone away from the main auction to sell the water pumps or whatever and if you can't cover them both you can miss a lot of what is going on. They will probably sell most of that stuff in huge lots so take your big truck and your trailer. Also, if you buy a pile of parts and they catch you selling anything out of it before the end of the auction they will kick you out of the auction. NO CASH trading hands during HER auction and at one I was at they said no selling anything you had bought while it was on the auction grounds, even after the auction. NO reselling cars or parts or whatever. The rule was you had to load it and get it off the auction grounds before you could "deal." I dunno why.

Handy hint! Take a spray can of awful colored paint with you and immediately when you buy something spray paint all over it. Put your number on the pile or the part if it is too big to take with you. They usually have NO security on anything and people will load your stuff while you are down the row bidding on something else. At least with bright neon Lavender paint you have a chance to hang on to it. Try to take somebody with you to load as soon as you buy and guard your truck after your purchases are loaded. At many auctions I go to the auction company has a couple kids to help load and a Gator or something to help haul to your vehicle. Not her -- at least not that I have seen. Many auction companies also have some kind of security on the grounds including the parking lot and video cameras running. If she does I have not seen it.

If you look at the piles before the auction and make a mental note to bid on one because of a piece in it make sure you check to see if it is there before you bid. They usually have NO security watching anything and a lot of stuff disappears before it ever gets sold.

My friend Dale Pavlis is one of her auctioneers; he is good but fairly quick so pay attention. There are always lots of good deals, especially when she is selling. She will throw stuff together and sell the whole pile to the first bidder and changes the game a lot so make sure you know what she is saying. She will say "So much a piece times the money." That means if there are 40 water pumps in the pile you have to buy them all at (just say) $10 apiece so you just bought a $400 pile of water pumps. Then the next items she will sell choice -- meaning you can pick out the ones you want if you are high bidder -- in the case of the water pumps maybe you would take 4 so your total bill would be $40 and they would re-bid the other 36. Then the next item she will say "pick one or make a pile." That means you pick one out of the pile and you are bidding on just that one. "Make a pile" means you can throw some in a box or a pile and she will bid just those. I have been to thousands of auctions and have never been so confused in my life as at a couple of her auctions. Sometimes she will do half a dozen choices and the next time she will choice once and then put them all together and sell everything all one money. Pay attention and you can get some good deals because so many people don't know what is going on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Thursday, September 08, 2016 - 03:51 pm:

Stan, That's all good advice. I've never been to one of her auctions, but won't forget these helpful hints if I ever go to one of them.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Friday, September 09, 2016 - 09:11 am:

I've heard she's not much of an auctioneer, but she's a very good promoter. That's how she gets these high-dollar sales. She knows how to get enough people there that stuff goes high.

That being said, she does get some pretty good sales. I would like to go to one just so I can see for myself how she runs her operation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Friday, September 09, 2016 - 09:48 am:

After reading all that from Stan I've changed my mind about wanting to go. Not that I would be able to anyway but....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, September 09, 2016 - 10:17 am:

Having been to some of her auctions, I second Stan's observations. Even with the chaotic selling and the huge lots, the high rollers who turn out for these things usually let a few crumbs fall off the table for us peons. But you have to be alert and be careful.


I was amazed to see her sell these in one big lot. As I recall, they went mighty cheap.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, September 09, 2016 - 11:03 am:

She gets a lot of auctions and makes a ton and a half of money. She has not been successful in Montana so far having only had one auction that was pretty much a flop. "The Gumbo collection -- Lavina, Montana, Sept 12, 2015." I did not go but they gave a lot of stuff away pretty cheap.

Anyway, what Steve just said is what I was saying. She will all of a sudden sell a huge pile of good parts, or in this case, tables full of desirable parts "all one money." Or possibly, "choice." Or possibly, "so many times the money." or possibly, "pick." Or possibly, "Make a pile." Or possibly just sell something on one bid to "Make you pay attention."

Dale is more consistent but this is their model for selling. She does it most but he does it and the other guy, Aaron, does it too.

A friend went to one of her auctions in Minnesota. He is a wealthy retired college professor with a couple farms in Nebraska and Iowa, a lot of business investments and a wife with a fine career. He has a collection of over 500 Neon signs. He has virtually unlimited money to add what he wants to his collection of signs and buys a new Corvette every couple years and often keeps the old one. Currently he has a 2016 convertible and she has a 2015 coupe. He had the money to buy what he wanted. However, she did not have any system in place to remove and load the signs at the auction. "You guys can get together after the auction and hire a forklift to help you get these down and loaded." No crew to help, etc. He left with a couple little signs he could put in the back seat of his $50,000+ pickup but he said he wasn't about to spend 5 or 6 grand on a neon sign and then have to rent a forklift to get it down from the rafters and pack it to haul home.

I dunno. A lot of people love her. I've had more than one person tell me she is the best auctioneer they have ever heard.

I know they get a lot of flak about the "No money changing hands while the auction is going on -- no selling of parts or anything you bought while we are selling." They tell you they will have you removed from the auction if they catch you selling something you bought while the auction is still going on. They make a big issue of it and I've heard they have actually told people to leave. I have not seen that but my deal is, I bought it and I own it and I'll sell it if I want to but didn't do it at her auction after she told me she would kick me out if I sold anything.

I think a bunch of you guys were at the auction near Lincoln, Nebraska a few years ago. That was the first time I went to one of hers and I went to another one in Spearfish, South Dakota a couple years later. They made that statement several times during the auction. I lost quite a bit of stuff at the Lincoln auction including some carburetors because I couldn't protect them and keep buying other stuff.

I don't walk very well anymore and was parked a ways away and by the time I got in to load a bunch of my stuff was missing. Not their fault but somebody went home with some things they didn't pay for. I had bought all the remaining carbs on the table for $225 because they wouldn't choice them again, I piled them up on the ground but didn't want paint on them. When I got back to load probably close to half of them were gone.

Well, have fun and buy lots, maybe you can at least preserve some of the parts until you have your auction.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, September 09, 2016 - 01:44 pm:

That kind of "lot management" is really hard on the bidders, IMHO. But the only ones disgruntled are the bidders, the sellers see $$$$ and so they're happy. I guess that's how such auctioneers get the sales. You do have to pay attention! "Make a pile" has got to slow down the auction, and most of them are already short of time! To me, that says "I don't have a clue what this stuff is, so you sort it for me"
Theft at auctions seems to be everywhere, and nothing new (I haven't been to an auction in decades--they're not to common in this area, but "estate sales" are common!) and I can't figure out why the auction companies haven't come up with some way of dealing with it. The other thing I've seen at previews is the "sorting of stuff in lots" where some item (usually from another lot) is quietly put hidden at the bottom of another lot pile. Occasionally I have told the staff, "this item in lot X actually is a part of the item in lot B" and sometimes they put them back together--but I'm not about to do it myself! Maybe slips to write the winning bidder on, and netting placed over the lot after the sale with the number under the netting and a rule that anyone caught lifting netting who isn't the winning bidder will be removed from this and any future auctions would slow some of the theft??
I dunno, thieves are pretty clever sometimes.
I hope whomever goes has a good time and gets to keep their stuff!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike peterson on Friday, September 09, 2016 - 01:51 pm:

I love buying big piles, the less of u people that go to her auctions the better deals for me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Friday, September 09, 2016 - 07:19 pm:

When Im at a big auction, Im either alone or take a helper. I do not usually go with friends. Its too easy to get talking and make mistakes or miss things when you are with friends. The helper is there to do the work and is being paid wages. I am also the guy up front and personal with the auctioneer. I want them to know to pay attention to me, as I am usually a serious bidder. I do not have unlimited deep pockets, but I do go to buy. Im like Mike above. I love big piles. I also take ugly weird colors of paint like Stan does and also some rolls of flurecent green and orange surveyor tape. I make piles and wrap them with the tape. It probably does not stop all theft but it deters the not so bold ones. Also put the junky parts on top of the pile, to hide the better stuff you bought. When you are bidding on something you saw earlier in a pile, make sure it is still there. Things tend to move around. If I was going to this sale I would not go with less than 10,000 dollars, even if I had to borrow the money. Back when I used to buy a lot (before I got old and retired) I had a standing line of credit at my bank for 10,000 dollars. It was always there when needed. If you do not go crazy and use your funds wisely it is easy to make three times your money and sometimes four times your money at a sale like this. The main thing is to pay attention..... Wish I was going, but I am still in my 12 step program to try and cure my auction/swap meet addiction ... :-) :-) and the wife said "NO" If anyone buys one of those TT C-Cab cabs and will bring it to Chickasha Pre War Swap Meet Ill probably be a motivated buyer for one of them ... :-) :-) Have fun and be safe ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, September 09, 2016 - 07:28 pm:

David made the comment that the sellers only see dollars, and so are happy. That's not always the case. The wife of a man with Alzheimers was left to clear up his collection when he went into care. She phoned me just one day before to help sort stuff, so I got little done. The auctioneers had little idea of what was what, and really only wanted to clear it all out. She dipped out badly.


It is usual here to have a truckload of small stuff, literally spread out on the tray of a truck. The auctioneer opened the bidding on a box of carbide motorcycle lamps before I could wise him up. I grabbed the box, told him to sell 'this one'. We sold a dozen of those lamps individually, and got more for the remaining parts at the end, than he was bid for the box full. It was about that time they realised they had it all wrong, and the lady was going to be well out of pocket.

Earlier,I had spent some time sorting T and A wire wheels into sets, some 50 wheels all up. Two lots before they were offered, a new hotshot auctioneer took over to speed things up a bit. The result was I bought all the wheels as one lot, making way more than I bid just selling the useless rusty ones as garden art pieces.

It should have been a two day sale, with some help engaged to sort it out beforehand.

Contrast this with the sale of his collection of old radios when the wife passed a few years later. Every lot catalogued and numbered. Seating for all the bidders. Each lot brought forward to be sold. All the remaining car parts were lotted the same way.
The nephew responsible netted more for this much smaller sale.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, September 09, 2016 - 07:54 pm:

The auction company makes all the difference in the world as to the success of the auction.

Unfortunately, many times the widow or children have no idea who the collector would have wanted to do his auction and it goes to the low bidder or the first guy that contacts them.

IMHO, too many auctioneers get in too big a hurry to get done and show everybody how fast they are. When I teach at auction school one of the things I ask the new people is how many chances you get to do it right. Obviously, the answer is ONE. I tell them to slow down and get the money. If you don't do a good job you can't call everybody and tell them to bring it all back and you will try to be better organized and do a better job next week.

It is also true that a lot of people know nothing about some things and a lot about others. I am not good with guns, a guy who works for me can spot a good gun 200 feet away at the first walk though.

We have lost a few auctions because I refuse to bid. I have a fee that I quote and if they don't like it they can find somebody else. After 34+ years and 416 auctions I think I am worth more than some newby who will do it cheap to get experience. Some people want to pay 3% of $10,000 instead of 30% of $100,000. All they can see is the commission percentage. A lot of people are absolutely terrified that the auctioneer might actually make some money.

I have to go back to the shop and work on Allen's carburetor because I never got rich in the auction business or the ranch business or the water well business or the carburetor business or anything else. Old and broke, fat and lazy and tired.

Since I never made enough money to retire and have hung on through good years and bad, years when I had 40 auctions and years when I had 2 I am now one of the longest - oldest auction companies in Montana and one of the oldest that is still active. Jerry Buckley is older and maybe a couple other guys. Since 1982. There have probably been at least a couple hundred that have come and gone in that time, maybe half a dozen that were pretty successful, most just faded away. It's a lot tougher business that it looks like. At least here, I dunno about other places.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Friday, September 09, 2016 - 07:57 pm:

I should also say I'd like to go to that auction just to see the stuff but I have so much stuff now I can't find time to play with what I already have. It would be a good one, tho. There will be some treasures found.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Friday, September 09, 2016 - 09:36 pm:

Good thread, good lessons. Thanks Stan.

I enjoy auctions but I'm always shy about bidding. I've missed some opportunities because I didn't speak up. I've gotten in trouble because I did speak up. But in the end an auction is a form of entertainment for me.

The most fun at auctions is the people watching. I usually go in my work clothes but have seen people who dress up like they're headed to the grand ball. Others look like they live under a bridge. Some of the trucks with goose neck trailers that show up are worth more than most houses around here and some of the trucks are such wrecks I'm surprised they make it.

An auction is a cross section of humanity that displays the local economy in detail.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, September 10, 2016 - 03:46 pm:

Veni , vidi, profecti sunt. I went, I saw, I left. I arrived at the auction site about 7:30 this morning. Ron Paetz (Lone Pine Enterprises) and Mark Freimiller (Model T Haven) were there. Mark commented that most of the stuff was pretty rough, and it was. The Model T stuff was mostly chassis and chassis parts, engines and blocks that had sat out in the weather, some rough bodies, and a row of wheels that were also mostly pretty rough. I had hoped for some decent small parts and maybe some tools, but that was a vain hope. I left about eight. The trip wasn't a total waste. On the way home I stopped and saw Brewster Higley's cabin.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Saturday, September 10, 2016 - 04:33 pm:

Dr. Brewster Higley, if I recall correctly, is generally credited with writing the original version of "Give Me a Home Where the Buffalo Roam" which eventually became "Home on the Range." A limestone house on the prairies of (hmmmmmmmmmmm)either northern Kansas or southern Nebraska.

My favorite version of the song is by Powder River Jack Lee, who added two verses celebrating the mountain foothills and valleys of the west.

(For the words, see my songbook "Singing Cowboys - a collection of 22 of my favorite old western songs"
published by Howitis Music & Publishing about 25 years ago. =)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Eviston on Saturday, September 10, 2016 - 05:19 pm:

This is why I do not care for auctions. Once, I stood around a table of T parts waiting for a Kingston 4 (or was it a 5)ball to come up. They were selling late model junk at the next table. While the bidding was on a coilboxes with switch at the'good'table,the the guy at the junk table couldn't get a bid on a fist full of windshield wiper blades.So,that rotten(insert several obscene insults hear, I sure as hell did) grabbed that pretty brass carburetor and held it up.The auctioneer knocked it off for two bucks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, September 10, 2016 - 05:56 pm:


Smith County, Kansas, eight miles south of the state line.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Saturday, September 10, 2016 - 10:34 pm:

i got those water pumps for mark frymiller $3.75 each took them all. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Hughes, Raymond, NE on Sunday, September 11, 2016 - 12:50 am:

I was really wanting to go to this auction. I just couldn't bring myself to make the 2 1/2 hour drive each way. Now, after the reports here, I don't feel so bad about not making the trip. I would like to hear more comments though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Sunday, September 11, 2016 - 02:10 am:

Here is a link to what a lot of it sold for: https://www.proxibid.com/asp/Catalog.asp?aid=114786&p=8&sort=0#cnTb


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike peterson on Sunday, September 11, 2016 - 08:41 am:

I watched online and thought they got plenty for the T stuff for what it was. glad I didn't go, I'll just head down to Kansas and pick up the pile that I bought off the forum, lot better deal and nicer stuff


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wallace B on Sunday, September 11, 2016 - 09:57 am:

Would of like to of gone but just to many auctions going on the same day. Anyone know if the script flatbeds were T or A and what they sold for?
Thnx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Sunday, September 11, 2016 - 12:22 pm:

What happens to the items that were not sold ? do they get scrapped?.
Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Sunday, September 11, 2016 - 12:32 pm:

rick! dont worry mark will take care of them. he got 16 loads for the big trailer.ha,ha. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Sunday, September 11, 2016 - 12:43 pm:

Charley, that's good, I bought my 26 coupe and other stuff over the years.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Clayton Swanson on Sunday, September 11, 2016 - 10:09 pm:

i was there, most of the above statements are true. there was half a dozen big players there that bought a lot of stuff, but they at least were offering choice on most piles. i was at the john crabtree sale in july, when she pretty much gave away the mans life savings for pennies on the dollar. the plan was to sell car bodies first, then parts. it really should have been a 2 day sale, but they were determined to finish in one. so, cars took until 2 in the afternoon, and then the rush. she was selling 3-4 pallets at a time, and often without a choice offering unless you asked. i left at 7 pm and they were not done yet. and at the end is when they really give it away! the dealers went away very happy that day, but i have enough crap plugging up my life and really only want to buy what i need, or what i can make a little money on to justify the cost of the trip. it is not cheap to travel in the modern world, most small towns have no mom and pops motel for 25-35 bucks any more, its go to a bigger town and pay 80-100. so, a peasant like me sleeps in the truck! side tracked there abit, but any way, evette will not do an auction for me i'm sure of that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, September 11, 2016 - 11:03 pm:

Yep, the rolling motel is the way to go for us peons. I think the last time I stayed in a real motel was eight years ago. The Camry seats lean way back to make a bed. Unless you're in New York or L.A., the local Wal-Mart is open 24/7 with restrooms, snacks, or whatever, so the parking lot is my campground. And the price is perfect.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerome Hoffman, Hays Kansas on Sunday, September 11, 2016 - 11:09 pm:

I got there a few minutes before 8:00, suppose I should have taken the fact I got to park right out in front as an omen. Lots of rust but I had not been to an auction with Model T parts for almost 2 years. I talked with friends and one from the east side of Neb. was saying he really hated how she does her auctions. Said she likes the cars as they go fast, hates pallets with parts and almost never sells choice. We talked how that really screws the people who hired her. I made maybe the only bid for a item for $5.00, when she got to a pile of Chevy frames with rear axles and several T fount axles piled on top her co auctioneer hesitated and took our interest for wanting choice so I piped up and said YES that axle start at $5.00. No one bid against me and so I got it for that. Later she did seem to sell more choice but I don't think any thing went below $25.00. I got a couple of decent to nice 26/7 steering columns, each had quadrant covers and full set of gears. Had to wait 5 hours for them to get to the wheels, got one 23" TT and two 20" TT rear wheels, NO rims for TT. Because she did not want to choice I was unable to bid on some wire wheel hubs that were on four different axles. Mark did get a lot of the T parts cars, no engines as the guy from Lone Pine out bid him. He picked all but one block up where they were piled together. One engine did sell on a pallet an hour later over by the wheels and another guy from NEB got that. Helped him load up after. Worst part was the sunburn, forgot the sunscreen but did have plenty of water and had a hat on. Note: had a burger from the truck and tho a bit pricey(not too bad) it was worth going just for that burger it was four star.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Monday, September 12, 2016 - 05:31 pm:

From the sound of it, going to a VanDerBrink auction will either yield large numbers of bargains or it'll bring way too much. Doesn't sound like there's a real mix of the two going on. I feel sorry for the people who hire her. There are many other auction companies in this country who can do a better job of taking care of both seller and bidder.


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