Trim for strip on wood firewall 1918 cowl side

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Trim for strip on wood firewall 1918 cowl side
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Lynn on Monday, September 12, 2016 - 08:00 pm:

There are thin metal strips that are nailed to the firewall and what looks like remnants of cloth but I don't know if the material went on the top of the strip or underneath. Anybody have photos of that close up?

thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Sims--Reed City,Mich. on Monday, September 12, 2016 - 08:55 pm:

The material is the remains of the firewall hood lacing that is nailed over the tin strip. This serves as a anti squeak seal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Lynn on Monday, September 12, 2016 - 09:38 pm:

Thank you Jim, is this the same as the lacing on the radiator shell?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Monday, September 12, 2016 - 09:38 pm:

Mark, try this. :-)
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/182377.html?1294979916


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Duey_C on Monday, September 12, 2016 - 09:44 pm:

Oops.
I say yes. It's 3'8 wide so you don't run into it with the hood hinge at the little cut out spot down on the firewall edge. I'm trying to save some lacing from a rad shell I have for use on the firewall and it's 3/8".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Wednesday, September 14, 2016 - 12:58 am:

By 1917 the wood dash was no longer 3/4" thick which is what can really screw up a lot of details if you try to make a replacement out of that thick of material. 11/16" was the nominal thickness starting sometime in 1915 if my memory serves me correctly. I have it exactly on my dash time line graph but it is not in front of me now. The post 1911 veneer dashes pretty much all fell apart since the glue they used was ordinary hyde glue and the core material had grain direction opposite of the veneer grain direction thus expansion and contraction due to moisture changes just pulled the dashes apart. In 1911 the veneers and the core wood grain directions were both horizontal and you can find many 1911 and earlier dashes that are still in very good shape but starting in 1912 they changed the direction of the core to be opposite of the veneer and those and later dashes just didn't hold up nearly as well. They pretty much ALL show the veneers separating from the core.


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