No mag, run distributor, coil, battery

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: No mag, run distributor, coil, battery
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Stephens - Arnold, CA on Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 06:34 pm:

For my '24 Gowjob project, I want to be able to do 50mph, spinning the magnets much faster than at 35mph. I would prefer not to tempt fate and remove the mag and associated parts.

I also see it stated a lot on the forum that the T runs better on mag than on battery.

So let's say I run a single coil and distributor like a lot of speedsters. But I run only off a 6V battery. Is this doable, or do I lose my top speed from not using a generator?

Tom


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 06:52 pm:

A Model t will go 50 MPH on magneto. The generator has no connection to the magneto. If you run ignition from a distributor you will need the generator to charge the battery. A distributor operates on battery power only.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Stephens - Arnold, CA on Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 06:57 pm:

I will trickle charge the battery.

Tom


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 07:05 pm:

62 mph in my racer w/no magneto. Can go faster but breaking 60 was all I wanted to do.

Regards,
Garnet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Stephens - Arnold, CA on Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 07:15 pm:

Garnet,

Do you run off battery charged outside of car or battery charged with generator/alternator?

Tom


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By HARRY A DAW Troy, Mo. on Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 10:41 pm:

Hope if you are going to run that fast, that you put disk breaks on all four wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 11:01 pm:

Don't confuse the mag with running on a distributor.
There are two different beasts.

If you remove the mag and all the associated parts you remove the reciprocating parts thus giving you the patential of higher RPM.

If your goal is 50 mph why play with a model T? .
Try dropping a rock off a high building and get your happy feeling


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Stephens - Arnold, CA on Saturday, September 17, 2016 - 11:26 pm:

Let me rephrase -

(Referring to the comments of those who say running a stock T on battery is slower than running on mag):

If you have run a T with a distributor ONLY on battery, do you find the car runs slower than a T with a distributor running with a generator/alternator?

Tom


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Sunday, September 18, 2016 - 12:42 am:

I have a T with no magnets and running coils only off of a 6 volt battery from a kids sidewalk car. I have had the car up to 50 mph with that configuration. Runs fine. No problems. It will do a 2 day tour on one charge of that realitively small battery. A set of original coils or distributor, either one, will run off of a battery. I have done it on coils for about 18 years now. The biggest reason you would need a generator is if you run headlights or if you run your starter a lot. Those two things are what eat up a battery charge.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Sunday, September 18, 2016 - 01:00 am:

Tom,

I ran my speedster (no magnets) with a distributor on battery only. Worked just fine, every day or two of running I'd hook up a battery charger to top off the battery. Battery powered the ignition as well as brake lights and an electric fuel pump. No problems. Eventually I went the horrid step of adding a belt driven (hide your eyes) alternator. My car, my choice. Goes faster than I care to drive it and yes I do recommend beefing up your braking system to match you desired speeds.

35 is fun, so is 55 or 60 on the right road with the right equipment.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Sunday, September 18, 2016 - 02:17 am:

Tom, I think that what you proposed in your first post is entirely doable.

I think your second post is OK too.

I think the answer to your 4th post is "no".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, September 18, 2016 - 05:45 am:

Tom S, As long as your battery has a reasonably good charge? The distributor does not care whether you have a generator or not. The magneto is in and of itself a totally different matter. The low voltage timer with four coils runs better on magneto because the magneto has inherent timing related to the positioning of the magnets, and therefore makes the engine run a little smoother than a battery with maladjusted coils (proper coil adjustment does help both battery and magneto power supply).

The FACT is, that a model T can be made to run very well and be fairly reliable on either magneto and four coils, OR battery and a single coil with a distributor. Both ways can work fine. A battery with low voltage timer and four coils also can work well, and for many thousands of enjoyable miles.
It truly is a matter of personal preference.
After-market high tension magnetos with external drives are a whole other area of ignition interest. My first speedster had one and I loved it!
Personally, I like most model Ts regardless of which good ignition systems it happens to have on it.

Many people, in many antique cars, have toured extensively for years with failed generators, running the engine off of a battery alone operating standard ignition. I personally ran at least two different Ts with six volt batteries and distributors for several years. They ran great, never let me down. Just trickle charge fairly often. And more than a few drives were about 300 miles between charging. I also toured a 1925 Studebaker for several years with a blown generator. I even drove that car at night a lot!
I could also comment that on the last major national club tour I went on about ten years ago (that fact has GOT TO change soon!). The tour went for about five days, and was a Nickel Vintage tour with mostly non-Ford automobiles. It is more common in the early non-Fords to have a failed generator, and NOBODY knows who, how, or where, to get them fixed! Many of them simply cannot be fixed because of pot metal parts that no replacements are available for. It was always interesting to wander about the hotel parking lot near the end of the day, seeing the many chargers hooked up to the various cars
It can work just fine.

Most important advice if you are going to run a single coil with a distributor? Make sure you have a proper coil matched to your battery. And since your model T won't be in their computer, they aren't going to be much help.
Six volt coils are wound differently than a 12 volt coil is. Or is it? For many years, most "12 volt coils" were actually 6 volt coils, regardless of what the box or book said. The reason for that, is that most American cars back in the '50s '60s '70s switched the voltage in the ignition switch. The 12 volt battery power was dropped down by either a resistor wire to the coil, or a precision ceramic resistor (which could have been hidden anywhere). Either way, the coil didn't care. It was given a short blast of 12 volts to start the engine on really cold mornings, then automatically changed to 6 volts to run happy all day. Because the car's electrical system was 12 volts, the coil was often identified as a 12 volt system coil, when it in fact was a 6 volt coil. Lots and lots of confusion.
Good luck!
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Sunday, September 18, 2016 - 07:27 am:

Tom, my racer supplies 12 volts via a rebuilt generator with a voltage regulator.

Garnet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Stephens - Arnold, CA on Sunday, September 18, 2016 - 02:42 pm:

Thanks very much to everyone who answered my questions with great info!

Tom


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