Help with a Mercury

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2016: Help with a Mercury
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Shirley on Monday, September 19, 2016 - 06:31 pm:

Bought it this way years ago. It has never had a steering column mounted or the body bolted to the frame. What I need are pictures of how the steering column should mount to firewall and dash. The body # is 214, it has no doors. It is on a '27 frame. I need the dimension of the wood blocks used between the body and frame. I (think) the fire wall original, but there are no holes that line up with the fire wall brackets, need a picture of how they should mount. Pictures of it, Thanks for any and all help, Bob at 903 824 1949


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By tim moore, "Island City" MI on Monday, September 19, 2016 - 08:26 pm:

You need this; https://www.modeltford.com/model-t-parts/speed-equipment/page-4.aspx

Not an exact Mercury part (close) but dimensional correct the last I saw. I made my cowl to frame mounts as I don't think the Ford parts fit but not assembled and sitting a long time. Jarvis Erickson is your friend on this... modeltbug@aol.com he is the expert. Buy all the books he has as his research is a lifetime and available nowhere else. That is a rare car with only about 1,200 built and less than 80 accounted
for. A no door 1921 is one of the first and yours is at the very end of no door Mercury's, lucky for you they didn't cut the body back out and add a door as many had done.

The Hemmings Mercury is really nice but if #18 a real prize. The down side is no lower step plates that should be there, no spare tire carrier off the back, hood is nice but not Mercury or Ford and the radiator shell is a Whippet. For that money I would also want the Mercury fender package and the top sockets and folding top along with the lower steps and spare tire assembly. It looks like the correct early Mercury windshield.

Tim Moore, Mercury #139---25 years now and about 80% correct. Good luck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Monday, September 19, 2016 - 09:14 pm:

For Tim -- you mentioned buy all the books Jarvis Erickson has. I enjoy his book "The Mercury Body -- The Search for The Messenger" which is a collection of some of his favorite photos of Mercury bodied cars (T & Chevy). I believe he is writing a more complete book to better document the various parts and different bodies. But does he have some other books already published on the Mercury? And if so, do we contact him to possibly obtain a copy? Thanks for any additional information you can provide.


For Bob -- I’m glad to see you are thinking about getting your Mercury going. To add to what Tim has already shared below are some illustrations from the Mercury Patent drawings. They are taken from Jarvis’s article about the Mercury Body Corporation pages 6 to 19 in the Jul – Aug 1980 “Vintage Ford.” They may have changed the mounting method from the time the patent was filed and they actually started production – that is an area I do not know along with many others.









Remember one of the nice things about speedsters is you can build them any way you desire. (That is true for Ts in general also). The Mercury body was offered as a kit and you could purchase a lot or a little depending on your budget at the time. They also had some demonstrators that for the right money they probably would have sold to someone. In the case of your 1926 chassis – It has some plus items. It already has been lowered 1 1/2 inches by Ford. Ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/1926-27H.htm where Bruce has: “The “improved” Fords were lower in height than the previous models. This height reduction was accomplished by not only reducing the height of the bodies themselves (except for the Fordor) but also by lowering the frame by a redesign of the front spindles, and a reduction of the crown in the front spring. The rear cross-member had a deeper curve which lowered the chassis somewhat as well. These modifications lowered the chassis height one and one-half inches. “

And the Mercury Body could be the 1926 improved car as shown in the photo below from page 6 of the same Jul – Aug 1980 “Vintage Ford” article that published the photo from the Detroit Library (used by permission to promote our hobby and club). It shows the 1926 Detroit Automobile Show, Mercury Body Corp display. But I would guess you will need to cut part of the ends off the rear cross member to get it to fit the body – unless you move the body back a little bit.



Speaking of which – you may want to consider mounting the body back a couple of inches. Many of our kids are getting taller and larger not shorter and smaller than we are. And of course once you start moving one item then others items have to be changed to get it to all line up.

There are also numerous steering column adaptations as well as makes that can be adapted. And you can gain some additional room in the front seat by having a shorter and not so low steering column. I would think you would be ahead to do a “mock up” of what you want the car to look like. From using the 1926 chassis or lowering it some more. Rootlieb can make you a hood to combine the Mercury cowl to a Mercury Radiator and shell or a Model T radiator and shell or a Willis shell etc. And they can make it shorter or longer as you might need it. Once you have the chassis and body like you want it, you can figure out what angle you want the steering at and what type of steering you want.

If you just want to get on the road quickly – the stock 1926 chassis without a hood makes it easy to align things. And you can shim the lower bracket on the frame to give you the angle you want. I would recommend a “fat man” steering wheel or a smaller one than the 1926 used.

And you will find a great support group – that is relying very heavily on Jarvis for all the excellent work he has already done and is continuing to do.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off

(Message edited by Hap_tucker on September 19, 2016)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Tuesday, September 20, 2016 - 07:31 am:

Bob,

Below is cropped section from Bruce McCalley's "Price List of Parts" that is included in the "Model T Comprehensive Encyclopedia" two disc CD set (available from: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/333725.html?1357665853 ). Notice that there are several lower steering column brackets. Most of them change the angle of the steering column a little bit. You will be making a wedge to get the angle you want -- so it isn't critical which bracket you use. But be sure your mock up and your final bracket are the same version.



Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


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